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Full text of "University of New Haven Evening Division Bulletin, 1973-74"

Diversity of New Haven 



Evening Division 
Bulletin 1973-1974 



University of New Haven 




LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVE 




University of New Haven 

Evening Division 

Bulletin 1973-1974 




h 




CONTENTS 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

EVENING AND EXTENSION CREDIT DIVISION 
Application 
Student Services 
Library 

Scholastic Regulations 
Requirements for the Degrees 
Honors 
Registration 
Summer School 
Tuition and Fees 

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Degree Programs 
Core Requirements 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Degree Programs 
Program Outlines 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Associate and Bachelor Degree Programs 
Extension Credit Programs 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

ADMINISTRATION 

FACULTY 

MAP 



6 

7 

8 

10 
14 
15 
16 
17 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 

27 
28 
36 

39 
40 
44 

59 
60 
67 

69 

119 

120 

121 

132 



TABLE 

OF 

CONTENTS 




HISTORY University of New Haven is the new name for an institution which for 

half a century prior to 1970 was known as New Haven College. Founded 
in 1920 by the Y.M.C.A. as a branch of Northeastern University, its 
early years were inconspicuous and its growth was slow. But it served 
a desperate need, functioning as a community college to provide an 
education for many who could not afford the time or tuition demanded 
by regular four-year colleges and universities. New Haven College had 
then, as the University of New Haven has now, a strong sense of 
responsibility to the community. 

In 1926 the college was incorporated by an act of the Connecticut 
Legislature and was authorized to grant the Associate in Science 
Degree. At the same time an agreement was reached with Yale for the 
use of its classrooms and laboratories during evening hours, augment- 
ing cramped and inadequate quarters which moved from building to 
building on various streets through the years. With the use of the Yale 
facilities the College was able to build a sound educational program 
in cooperation with local business and industry. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



From 1941 to 1945 New Haven College administered the Official Yale 
University Engineering, Science, Management, and War Training 
Programs for New Haven County. In 1948 the College took a signifi- 
cant step forward with accreditation of its Associate in Science degree 
program by the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 



During the next decade several new programs were inaugurated. 
These were The Reading Center, The Division of Special Studies, and 
the School of Executive Development — now the Management Center. 
Two daytime programs for recent high school graduates were instituted: 
Industrial Administration, and Industrial Engineering. 

In 1958 New Haven College was authorized by the Connecticut 
General Assembly to offer courses of study leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree to both day and evening students. In 1960 the College 
acquired the present West Haven Campus and began a decade of rapid 
growth. Programs for full-time students were expanded and new 
courses made available in other credit and non-credit curricula. The 
acquisition of 28 acres of undeveloped land near the main campus in 
1962 made possible construction of playing fields, tennis courts, and 
a new Physical Education-Auditorium Building. Most recently the Uni- 
versity has broken ground for the construction of a new $1,600,000 
library which is scheduled for completion in 1974. 

The College received full accreditation in 1966 when the New England 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools accredited its Bachelor 
degree programs. Full accreditation has enabled the College to work 
more effectively towards the achievement of its principal objectives: to 
provide leaders and professional personnel with an understanding of 
important cultural and scientific progress, and to encourage students 
to reach the maximum of their potential. 



A new and major addition to the College came in 1969 when the 
Graduate School was established with programs offered initially in 
Business Administration and Industrial Engineering. This school has 
undergone rapid growth, adding new programs and increasing its 
enrollment to its present level of more than 700 students. 

In October, 1970, the Board of Governors of New Haven College voted 
to change the name of the institution to The University of New Haven 
and this action was subsequently approved by the State of Connecticut. 




CALENDAR 



Summer Session, 1973 



EVENING 

CREDIT 

DIVISIONS 



Registration period 


Tuesday-Wednesday 


May 29-30 


Tuition due on or before 


Wednesday 


May 30 


Classes begin 


Monday 


June 11 


Holiday (Independence Day) 


Wednesday 


July 4 


First term final examinations 


Monday 


July 16 


Second term classes begin 


Wednesday 


July 18 


Second term final examinations 


Wednesday 


August 22 



Fall Semester, 1973 



6 



Registration for current and former students Monday-Friday August 13-24 

Registration for new students Tuesday-Wednesday August 28-29 

Tuition due on or before Thursday August 30 

Labor Day Monday September 3 

Classes begin Tuesday September 4 

Last day to add courses Tuesday September 18 

Mid-semester: last day to drop courses Friday October 26 

Holiday (Thanksgiving) Wednesday-Friday November 21-23 

Last day of classes Friday December 14 

Final examinations Monday-Friday December 17-21 



Spring Semester, 1974 



Registration for current and former students 

Registration for new students 

Tuition due on or before 

Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 

Holiday (Washington's Birthday) 

Mid-semester: last day to drop courses 

Spring vacation 

Classes resume 

Holiday (Good Friday) 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 

Commencement 



Wednesday-Friday 


January 2-11 


Monday-Tuesd'ay 


January 14-15 


Wednesday 


January 16 


Thursday 


January 17 


Thursday 


January 31 


Monday 


February 18 


Friday 


March 15 


Saturday-Sunday 


March 16-24 


Monday 


March 25 


Friday 


April 12 


Friday 


May 10 


Monday-Friday 


May 13-17 


Sunday 


June 9 



Summer Session, 1974 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Registration period 


Tuesday-Friday 


May 


28-June 7 


Tuition due on or before 


Friday 




June 7 


Classes begin 


Monday 




June 10 


Holiday (Independence Day) 


Thursday 




July 4 


First term final examinations 


Monday 




July 15 


Second term classes begin 


Wednesday 




July 17 


Second term final examinations 


Wednesday 




August 21 



The University of New Haven has four administrative divisions: The 
Day Credit Division, the Division of Continuing Education, the Graduate 
School, and the Management Center. Included in the Division of Con- 
tinuing Education are the Evening Credit Program, the Extension Credit 
Programs, the Summer School, the Division of Special Studies, and 
the Intersession Program. All divisions of the University are coeduca- 
tional. 



DIVISIONS 

OF THE UNIVERSITY 



Day The degree-granting Day division offers curricula which lead to 
the four-year Bachelor degree and the two-year Associate degree. 

Students pursuing a course of studies leading to a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Business Administration may elect a major in 
Accounting, Communications, Criminal Justice, Economics, Finance, 
General Management, Hotel Management, International Business, Oper- 
ations Management (including Computer Concentration), Marketing, 
Public Administration, or Retailing. 

Students pursuing a course of studies leading to a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Engineering may elect a program in Civil, Electrical, 
Industrial, Materials or Mechanical Engineering. 

Students pursuing a course of studies leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Industrial Technology may elect a major in Management or Com- 
puter Technology. 

Students pursuing a course of studies leading to a Bachelor of Arts 
degree may elect a major in Art, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, 
English, Environmental Studies, Fire Science, History, Mathematics, 
World Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Soci- 
ology, and Social Welfare. By taking a modified program in either 
Chemistry or Physics the student may receive a Bachelor of Science 
degree. A student may also elect to pursue an interdisciplinary course 
of study leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in American Studies. 

The Institute of Law and Public Affairs offers para-professional minor 
programs in the areas of legal affairs and public affairs. Students in 
this program follow normal progression in their chosen major but take 
elective courses in the Institute. 

An Associate in Science degree may be obtained in Business Admin- 
istration, Engineering Science, Law Enforcement, Correctional Admin- 
istration, or Arts and Sciences. 

Students pursuing a course of studies leading to an Associate in Science 
degree in Arts and Sciences may elect a major in Biology, Chemistry, 
General Studies, Commercial and Advertising Art, or Journalism. 



UNDERGRADUATE 
CREDIT PROGRAMS 

DAY 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



UNDERGRADUATE 

CREDIT PROGRAMS 

EVENING 



8 



Evening The degree-granting Evening Division offers curricula which 
lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Industrial Technology, and Associate in Science. 

A Bachelor of Science degree is offered in the following areas: Busi- 
ness Administration with majors in Accounting, Communications, 
Criminal Justice, Economics, Finance, General Management, Hotel 
Management, International Business, Operations Management (includ- 
ing Computer Concentration), Marketing, Public Administration, and 
Retailing; Civil, Electrical, Industrial, Materials, and Mechanical En- 
gineering. Criminal Justice majors are Law Enforcement Administration, 
Forensic Science, and Correctional Administration. 

The Bachelor of Industrial Technology degree is offered with options 
in Management and Computer Technology. 

The Institute of Law and Public Affairs offers para-professional minor 
programs in the areas of legal affairs and public affairs. Students in 
this program follow normal progression in their chosen major but take 
elective courses in the Institute. 

A Bachelor of Arts degree may be obtained in the following areas: Art, 
Biology, Chemistry, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, Fire 
Science, History, Mathematics, World Music, Philosophy, Physics, 
Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Social Welfare. 

An Associate in Science degree is offered in the following areas: Gen- 
eral Studies; General Management; Engineering with a major in En- 
gineering, Engineering Science, Occupational Safety and Hygiene; and 
Correctional Administration. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



EXTENSION PROGRAMS 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The Graduate School currently offers programs leading to the degrees 
of Master of Business Administration, Master of Science in Industrial 
Engineering, Master of Science in Operations Research, Master of 
Public Administration, Master of Science in Criminal Justice, Master 
of Science in Computer and Information Science, and Master of Arts 
in Community Psychology. 

Prospective students seeking detailed statements on any of the above 
graduate programs and an application blank should write or call: Dean 
of the Graduate School, University of New Haven, 300 Orange Avenue, 
West Haven, Conn. 06516, telephone (203) 934-6321, ext. 280. 

A particular function of an urban University is to organize and develop 
programs of study which will serve the more specific needs of area 
industries and organizations. The University of New Haven has under- 



taken these programs as the needs were recognized. Such programs 
take the form of off-campus extension classes held in various locations 
throughout Connecticut. Current program offerings include: 

Criminal Justice Programs The dramatic changes in the nature and 
scope of the problems confronting society in various areas of law en- 
forcement require equally important adjustments in the approach to 
solving them. Highly educated people in all the fields of law enforce- 
ment have become a necessity. 

The basic program leading to the Associate in Science degree prepares 
students to be proficient and competent in the many aspects of police 
work. It offers professional and cultural courses at the college level for 
careers in private or public law enforcement. 

The Bachelor of Science degree programs, in either Administration or 
Science, require the associate degree program as a base. They supply 
the specialized courses for careers in their respective areas as well as 
the regular liberal arts studies. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 



Groton Extension Division This program leads to a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Business Administration, Mechanical Engineering, Indus- 
trial Engineering or Industrial Technology. The majority of courses are 
taught in the Groton area, but it is recognized that certain courses 
must be taught on campus at the University of New Haven. Matricula- 
tion into this program presumes the equivalent of the first two years 
of a comparable program. 



GROTON 
EXTENSION 



This Division offers a series of professional certificate courses in 
engineering, business, and general areas. They are usually designed 
to provide supplemental knowledge and skills needed in specialized 
jobs in business and industry, and do not carry academic credit. Fur- 
ther information may be obtained by requesting separate schedules 
and course folders from the Director of the Division of Special Studies. 
Courses are approved for Veterans' Benefits. 



DIVISION 

OF SPECIAL STUDIES 



The purpose of the Management Center is to provide educational 
opportunities for those managers and administrators in industry, busi- 
ness, and service organizations whose needs are not met in more 
conventional undergraduate or graduate programs. The overall objec- 
tive of the Center is to offer programs to help managers of maturity 
and experience meet the broader and more complex requirements of 
positions of greater responsibility in their organizations. 



MANAGEMENT CENTER 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



MANAGEMENT CENTER 



Broadly speaking, the programs of the Center are designed to meet 
the needs of two different levels of management, 1) that of staff and 
line executives at upper levels, and 2) middle management adminis- 
trators. At the upper executive level the programs consist of seminars 
and workshops of varying lengths as needed. At the middle manage- 
ment level the standard format is a part-time oncampus program. Also 
planned are inplant programs in which the curriculum will be specific- 
ally designed to meet individual company or industry needs. In addi- 
tion there are special programs available on an ad hoc basis, either on 
or off campus, as required. 



10 



ACCREDITATIONS 

AND 

MEMBERSHIPS 



The University of New Haven is a coeducational, non-sectarian, in- 
dependent institution of higher learning chartered by the Legislature of 
the State of Connecticut and fully accredited by the Connecticut State 
Department of Education. The University holds membership in the 
New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the Asso- 
ciation of American Colleges, the Connecticut Conference of Independ- 
ent Colleges, the College Entrance Examining Board, and is also a 
member of New England and national professional organizations. 

The New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
accredits schools and colleges in the six New England States. Member- 
ship in one of the six regional accrediting associations in the United 
States indicates that the school or college has been carefully evaluated 
and found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified educators. 
Colleges support the efforts of public school and community officials 
to have their secondary schools meet the standards of membership. 



EVENING 

AND EXTENSION 

CREDIT DIVISIONS 

OBJECTIVES 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The Division of Continuing Education also holds membership in the 
Connecticut Association of Continuing Education, the Association of 
University Evening Colleges, and the National Association of College 
and University Summer Sessions. 

The University believes that work is good educational experience, but 
it is improved when related to academic instruction. This means that a 
student's work and scholastic program should be integrated as far as 
possible. By such integration the traditional barrier between the aca- 
demic and the practical may be broken down. 

In accordance with this viewpoint, the University encourages and assists 
its students to seek employment related to their degree programs or 
to pursue courses of study related to their work. The relationship 



between work and study necessarily varies, of course, but becomes 
increasingly important after the first year of study. The placement 
activity of the University is designed to implement the idea of an 
integrated program of work and study. 



Most courses, except laboratory and certain four-hour courses, offered SCHEDULE 

in the Evening Credit Program are scheduled to meet from 7:00 to Qp HQURS 

9:45 one evening per week. The University operates Monday through 
Friday. 

A student may carry as few as three semester hours or as many as SUBJECT LOAD 

eleven, depending on his wishes. The same academic standards are 
required of the student regardless of the number of credits he carries. 



Since each program of the University has its own admission require- 
ments, these requirements are defined in detail in subsequent pages of 
this catalog. 

In general, graduates of accredited secondary schools are eligible for 
admission. However, in special cases persons who have not completed 
their high school education may be admitted to the various divisions 
of the University of New Haven by meeting certain specified conditions. 

In the case of adults, the University is interested in evidence of 
maturity and motivation as well as in formal education as prerequisites 
for admission. 

With the exception of "auditors," students wishing to take any 
course, whether or not they seek a degree, must satisfy the admission 
requirements. 

The University of New Haven welcomes the applications of students 
from all geographic areas, from public or private schools, and from all 
races, economic levels, and religions. 



ADMISSION 



11 




CLASSIFICATION 
OF STUDENTS 



12 



There are three classifications of students in the Evening Credit pro- 
grams: 

Degree Student The degree student indicates on his registration that 
he is undertaking to complete the requirements for the A.S., B.A., or 
B.S. degree in one of the Evening Credit programs. He must satisfy 
all the admission requirements and be a fully matriculated student. 

Non-Degree Student The non-degree student is one who does not 
intend to meet all the requirements for a degree but who wishes to 
select certain subjects which are offered as a part of the degree 
requirements. Although not seeking a degree, the non-degree student 
must satisfy all admission requirements in the same way as the degree 
student, thus making it possible for him to become a degree candidate 
at any later registration simply by so indicating on his registration. 
Although the student is not a candidate for a degree, he must be fully 
matriculated. 

Auditor The classification of auditor is assigned to persons who wish 
merely to attend class and listen to the discussion. Since they are not 
obligated to meet any of the admission requirements, they are not 
privileged to participate in discussion nor to have tests and examina- 
tions graded by the instructor; they are not subject to attendance 
regulations and are not granted credit. 



ADMISSION 

OF STUDENTS 

FROM 

SECONDARY 

SCHOOLS 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Requirements The following regulations apply to the admission of 
students from secondary schools. 

The applicant should be a graduate of an approved secondary school or 
should possess a state high school diploma.* In some cases, an adult 
who has completed at least two years of secondary school with satis- 
factory record may be considered, provided he performs exceptionally 
well on the placement examinations which are required. The admission 
of such an adult will be tentative for one year, during which time he 
must pass the state examinations for the state high school diploma. 
No person will be considered who has not completed at least two years 
of secondary school. The quality of the secondary school record, espe- 
cially of the academic subjects it contains, is given greater considera- 
tion than is the specific pattern of courses taken in secondary school. 

Applicants from secondary schools are required to take admission 
tests, including Scholastic Aptitude, Mechanics of English, and Read- 
ing Comprehension. College Entrance Examination Board results, if 
satisfactory, are accepted in place of the University of New Haven 
admission examinations. 

' Information regarding the examination for the state high school diploma may be obtained 
from the Director of Admissions, or by writing to the Bureau of Youth Services, State Depart- 
ment of Education, State Office Building, Hartford, Connecticut 06103. 



Requirements Transfer students may apply to the University of New 
Haven after successfully completing one or more semesters at an 
accredited college. Generally speaking, transfer credit will be granted 
for courses in which the student has obtained a grade of "C" or better 
in a subject which is similar in content to one given in a major at the 
University of New Haven or is an acceptable elective. 

In accordance with the requirements of a particular department, a 
student may be required to tal^e an English or a Mathematics exam- 
ination. 



ADMISSION 
OF TRANSFER 
STUDENTS 



Transfer students who do not have the required thirty semester hours of 
work as noted above, or who have been dismissed for academic 
deficiency, are not required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Examina- 
tion in addition to the other placement examinations which are appli- 
cable, as described above. Students who have been dismissed for 
academic deficiency will be considered only after the lapse of one 
semester. 



13 



Transfer students who are not certain of the quality of their previous 
work are advised to take all entrance examinations lest their transcripts 
be delayed or be of an unacceptable quality. 



Advanced Standing Transfer credit from other colleges will be official- 
ly granted upon the completion of 12 semester hours at the University 
of New Haven with a satisfactory academic record. 

Transfer students who wish to fulfill the requirements for the 
bachelor degree or the associate degree at the University of New Haven 
must complete the last 30 semester hours of their program at the 
University of New Haven. Also, for associate degrees 12 semester 
hours must be in the field of specialization, and for bachelor degrees 
18 semester hours must be in the field of specialization. 



ADVANCED 
STANDING 



A student who has independent knowledge of the content of an 
undergraduate course offered by the University may, with the approval 
of the respective department chairman and dean, take a special credit- 
ing examination in lieu of taking the course. 

The University of New Haven accepts credit by examination from the 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Credit is evaluated by the 
Deans of each School. 



CREDITING 
EXAMINATIONS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
PROGRAMS 



14 



APPLICATION 
PROCEDURES 



TRANSFER 
OF CREDIT 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



No student may take crediting examinations during the first or last 
semesters in which he is enrolled. To graduate he must earn at least 
30 semester hours through regular course work. 

In addition to the traditional professions such as law, medicine, 
public service, and the ministry, more and more vocations require that 
students continue their training after earning the Bachelor degree. 
Students who wish to begin training for a profession at the graduate 
level should write to the university they expect to attend and ask for 
a statement of the entrance requirements. Prescribed programs in the 
major areas will be modified to meet requirements for entrance into 
professional programs or to meet the special needs of individual 
students. Such program must be approved in writing by the appropriate 
department chairman. 

Those interested in seeking admission should call or write the Univer- 
sity and arrange for a personal interview with a staff member. At the 
time of the interview the applicant will complete a Personal Data Form 
and will plan his program. Interviews may be scheduled during Univer- 
sity office hours at the convenience of the applicant. 

When the student decides to seek admission, he pays the application 
fee and arranges for the procurement of necessary transcripts. 

Following application, the University requests the secondary school 
record of the applicant. Applicants who wish to present college tran- 
scripts, either for admission purposes or for advanced standing, must 
themselves request that their college transcripts be sent to the Uni- 
versity. The University provides a form for this purpose. 

The applicant next takes such placement examinations as are required 
of him and is notified in writing of his acceptance or rejection, and of 
the subjects he will be required to take as a result of his performance 
on the placement examinations. 

During the registration period he fills out the registration forms, indi- 
cating the courses he wants, and pays the tuition charges. 

In accordance with the usual practice among institutions of higher 
learning, transfer of credit from this University to another institution 
will be determined by the other institution in terms of the achievement 
and promise of the individual seeking transfer. The institution to which 
transfer is being made will also evaluate specific courses in terms of 
their length and content in relation to its specific requirements. The 
University of New Haven is an accredited institution, and its credit will 
be given consideration by the major institutions of the country in terms 
of the conditions outlined above. 



Counseling and Guidance The University maintains counseling and 
guidance officers on its staff. Staff and faculty also reserve many hours 
for counseling with students. Appointments for this purpose should be 
made at the Evening Reception Office. 



STUDENT 
SERVICES 



Placement Service Requests are often received from students and 
employers for job placement services. Although the University does not 
conceive its function to be that of a public employment service, it is 
interested in and prepared to render placement service within the 
limitations of its purpose and resources. It acts as a medium of ex- 
change of information between students and former students who 
desire placement, and employers seeking personnel. It is particularly 
interested in helping students to find positions which require college 
study or which lead to careers that require such education, and in 
assisting students to find employment related to their programs of 
study. 

Any student, undergraduate, graduate, or alumnus of the University 
who desires placement should call at the office for a placement appli- 
cation form and at that time will receive specific information as to 
whom he is to contact in regard to his placement problem. 

A company wishing to use the placement facilities of the University 
should list the job and the desired qualifications in the form of a letter. 
A member of the University staff will then contact the company to 
discuss procedure and possibilities of filling the position. 



PLACEMENT 



15 



Membership in the Evening Student Council is open to all evening credit 
students who have successfully completed one full semester. Nomina- 
tions and elections by secret ballot are conducted in the spring of each 
year. Council meetings are held monthly; all evening credit students 
are welcome to attend. 

The Council has three primary objectives: 

To unite the evening students to promote the welfare of the evening 

student body of the University. 

To give counsel and encouragement to all evening students of the 

University and to develop a school spirit among them. 

To convey evening student opinion to the administration and to work 

with the officers of the University to accomplish student objectives. 

Fraternities In 1967, the Criminal Justice students formed a joint 
day and evening fraternity. Membership is open to all students pur- 
suing a degree in Criminal Justice. Students who are interested in join- 
ing the Criminal Justice fraternity should contact the Director of 
Continuing Education. 



EVENING 
STUDENT 
COUNCIL 



FRATERNITIES 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



HONOR SOCIETY 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 



Honor Society In 1969, the Evening Division was accepted as a mem- 
ber of the National Honor Society Alpha Sigma Lambda. There are 
presently 75 members in the Alpha Sigma chapter of the University. 
Membership in the Honor Society is by invitation during the spring 
semester of each academic year. Any student interested in the Honor 
Society should contact the Director of Continuing Education. 

Student Publications Evening students may volunteer their services 
to work on any of the student publications: The News, the University's 
student newspaper, The Chariot, the University yearbook, and The UNH 
Student Handbook. The Evening Student Council publishes its own 
newspaper. Night Beat. 



16 



RADIO STATION ^^ ^^^'° station WNHU, 88.7 MHZ, is the University's student-oper- 

ated FM radio station. Located in the Student Center, the 1,700 watt 
station serves the Student Body and the greater New Haven community. 
All work and management is done by students and any student may 
volunteer his help. 



FINANCIAL AID 



Financial Aid and Scholarships Various types of financial aid are avail- 
able at the University. A limited number of partial tuition grants-in-aid 
are available during the Fall and Spring semesters. Grants are also 
available to full-time employees of a publicly funded law enforcement 
agency under the Law Enforcement Student Grant Program. Payments 
up to $300 per semester are provided to part-time students working 
towards a degree in this field. Criteria are need and scholastic stand- 
ing. Various organizations make available each year a limited number 
of academic scholarships. For further information contact the Evening 
Director or the Director of Financial Aid. 



LIBRARY ^^^ Library contains more than 75,000 volumes, over 2,000 LP's, 

extensive corporation annual reports, pamphlet files, and microfilm. 
About 900 periodicals and extensive back-issue files are maintained. 

The resources of the New Haven and West Haven Public Libraries are 
available to students (non-residents must pay a fee). Under a reciprocal 
policy, students may charge material from Albertus Magnus and Quinni- 
piac libraries by presenting their validated ID's. 



ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Membership in the Alumni Association is acquired immediately 
upon graduation. A member of the administrative staff of the University 
serves as Director of Alumni Relations. An Executive Committee con- 
ducts the affairs of the Association during the period between annual 
meetings and also serves as a planning group. There is an alumni fund 
chairman for annual giving. 



In addition to the annual meeting, other meetings of social and 
educational interest occur during the year, and a quarterly publication, 
the Alumni News, is mailed without charge to each alumnus. 

The Alumni Association is represented on the Board of Governors by 
the election of a member to the Board for a term of two years. The 
president of the Association serves on the Board of Governors as an 
ex-officio member. 

Membership on the Alumni Advisory Council is by invitation. Twenty 
distinguished graduates of the University presently constitute the 
group. The Council is an advisory board to the University in the con- 
duct of alumni affairs. Its primary objectives are to strengthen alumni 
relations, advise on matters of top-level policy involving the alumni, 
improve communications with them, and assist in planning and con- 
ducting alumni events. The Council meets quarterly at the University 
with the President of the University and the Director of Alumni 
Relations. 



ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



ALUMNI 
ADVISORY COUNCIL 



17 



Grading System The following grading system is in use and, except 
where otherwise specified, applies both to examinations and to term 
work. The weight of a final examination grade is a matter individually 
determined by each instructor. A — Superior, B — Good, C — Fair, D — 
Lowest passing grade, F — Failure. 

Inc. Incomplete. Indicates that some work remains to be completed. 
Such work must be made up within six months in order to 
remove the "incomplete." Otherwise, the "Inc." remains on 
the student's record, no credit is given for the course, and it 
must be repeated before further work for which it is prerequi- 
site may be taken. 

W Withdrawal. Indicates either: (1) withdrawal prior to midpoint 
of semester, or (2) withdrawal after midpoint of semester and 
work satisfactory at that time. 

F Indicates failure or withdrawal after midpoint of semester 
with unsatisfactory work. 

S Satisfactory. Given only in non-credit courses. 

U Unsatisfactory. Given only in non-credit courses. 

Grade Reports Reports of the final grade in each subject will be 
mailed to the student after the close of each semester. The same report 
will be mailed to employers in those instances where the student has 
given his approval. Reports will be mailed to parents or guardians of 
all students under 18 years of age. 



SCHOLASTIC 
REGULATIONS 



GRADING 
SYSTEM 



GRADE 
REPORTS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



ACADEMIC 
STANDARDS 



18 



Academic Standards The academic standing of each student will be 
determined on the basis of his quality point ratio each semester. 
During each year of enrollment in the University, a quality point ratio 
of 1.5 is required. 

Failure to earn the required quality point ratio in any year will place a 
student on academic probation for the following semester of enrollment. 
A student is automatically dismissed when he receives a third proba- 
tion, or when his quality point ratio for any one year is less than 
1.00. 

Attention is called to the fact that the minimum quality point ratio of 
1.5 which is required to remain in good academic standing from year 
to year is insufficient to meet the graduation requirement of a total 
quality point ratio of 2.0. Therefore, the fact that a student may never 
have been on probation is no guarantee that he will meet graduation 
requirements. 

In order to determine quality point ratios, each letter grade is assigned 
a quality point value: A — 4 quality points, B — 3 quality points, C — 2 
quality points, D — 1 quality point, F — quality points. 




The quality point ratio for all credit students is obtained by multiplying 
the quality point value of each grade by the number of semester hours 
of the course, then dividing the total quality points by the total 
semester hours. 



QUALITY POINT RATIO 



Readmission Application for readmission after a student has been 
dismissed w\\ be considered only after the lapse of a semester and 
only when the student provides evidence w^hich indicates his probable 
success if readmitted. 

Requests for readmission should be submitted in writing to the dean 
of the academic division involved at least three weeks before the open- 
ing of the semester and should include evidence supporting the stu- 
dent's belief that he will succeed if readmitted. 

Readmission does not automatically follow; each application is decided 
individually by the Committee on Academic Standing. 



READMISSION 



19 



Dean's List Evening students who have accumulated a minimum of 
14 semester hours at the University will automatically be considered 
for the Dean's List at the end of each semester. A cumulative quality 
point ratio of 3.20 or better is required. 



DEAN'S LIST 



Withdrawal — Evening Division 

From the University Students are required to discuss their intentions 
with the Director of Continuing Education before withdrawing from the 
University. 

From a Program Students considering a change in program should 
first discuss the matter with the department chairman of the proposed 
new program. If it is agreed that the change is advisable, written per- 
mission will be granted. Forms for making a change are provided at the 
Evening Reception Desk. 

From a Course Forms are provided at the Evening Division Office. 



WITHDRAWAL 



The Baccalaureate or Associate degree will be conferred at Commence- 
ment when the student has met all the requirements of his program 
and has met the following University requirements: 

1. Has earned a cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00. 

2. Has been recommended by the faculty. 

3. Has met all financial obligations. 

4. Has completed the last 30 semester hours at the University of 
New Haven. 



DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE 
WITH HONORS 



A degree With Honors is awarded to students who have a quality 
point ratio of 3.25 for the semester hours specifically required for the 
degree program from which they are being graduated, and who have 
taken 30 or more hours of required work at this university. 



Transfer students will be awarded honors on the same basis, with 
the provision, however, that their total average will be considered only 
when they have an honor average for studies completed at this 
university. 



A degree With High Honors is awarded to students who have a qual- 
ity point ratio of 3.50 based on the same considerations as noted above. 



20 



In determining eligibility for degrees with honor, credits earned by 
crediting examinations and electives in excess of those required will 
not be considered. 



Honors may be conferred upon candidates for graduation who have 
completed at least 60 semester hours of work at the University of New 
Haven in their junior and senior years. The following standards shall 
be used: 



BACHELOR DEGREE 
WITH HONORS 



1. The bachelor degree Cum Laude may be awarded to a student 
whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.25 at the end of the 
first semester of his senior year and who continues to attain the same 
standard for the remainder of the year. 



2. The bachelor degree IVIagna Cum Laude may be awarded to a 
student whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.50 at the end 
of the first semester of his senior year and who continues to attain the 
same standard for the remainder of the year, whose quality point ratio 
in all courses counting toward his major is at least 3.50, and who has 
completed all the suggested courses within his curriculum. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



3. The bachelor degree Summa Cum Laude may be awarded to a 
student whose cumulative quality point ratio is at least 3.70 at the 
end of the first semester of his senior year, who continues to attain the 
same standard for the remainder of the year, whose quality point ratio 
in all courses counting toward his major is at least 3.70, and who has 
completed all the suggested courses within his curriculum. 



Advanced study courses are offered for qualified students in the 
departments offering the degree of Bachelor of Science or Bachelor 
of Arts. These courses may include a thesis, tutorial work, or in- 
dependent study which permits the students to work intensively in 
areas of special interest. 



ADVANCED STUDY 



Degree and Non-Degree Students There are two parts to registration, 
the completion of the registration forms and the payment of tuition. 
Both should be completed before the closing date of registration as 
stated in the calendar. There is a penalty fee for delaying either of 
these two processes beyond the closing date of registration. 

Registration is possible within office hours during the registration dates 
stated in the calendar. 

New students must register in person at the University Evening Office. 
Currently enrolled evening students may register by mail. Forms are 
mailed to the student prior to the announced registration dates. 

A separate registration is required for each of the semesters and for 
the summer session. 

Auditors follow the same procedure and pay the same fees as credit 
students. 



REGISTRATION 



21 



Students are urged to plan their programs carefully before completing 
the registration forms in order to avoid the need for requesting changes. 
Once the registration period has ended, the student is charged the 
Change of Registration Fee for each change which he makes. The fee 
is payable when the student completes the form requesting the change. 



CHANGES 

IN 

REGISTRATION 



Classes are operated on the policy that it is necessary for all students 
to attend all class meetings. If a class is missed, the benefits from 
participation in the class discussion and instruction are completely 
lost. No student, regardless of ability, can afford that loss. 

A student is allowed only two absences per semester for a 3- or 4-semes- 
ter hour course. If the student is absent more than twice, permission to 
continue in the course must be obtained from the instructor. 



ATTENDANCE 
REGULATIONS 



The University reserves the right to change any provision or require- 
ment designated herein, and to effect the withdrawal of any student 
whose conduct at any time is not satisfactory to the University. 



REVISIONS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



SUMMER 
SCHOOL 



22 



The University offers summer sessions with these primary functions: 



1. To offer opportunity for summer study to those residents of the 
New Haven area who attend other schools during the regular school 
year. For financial reasons, most of these students find it desirable 
to live at home and work during the summer. The summer program 
of the University is offered in both the Day and Evening divisions. 
Reasons for summer study vary, but are generally confined to the 
following: 

a. To make up deficiences. 

b. To satisfy prerequisites for courses in the present institution. 

c. To acquire advanced standing in the parent school. 

Some 145 institutions have authorized their students to take courses 
here and transfer their credits. For assurance of the acceptance of 
credit by the parent school, written approval of that school is required. 
The University of New Haven is a member of the New England Associa- 
tion of College and Secondary Schools and the National Association 
of Summer Schools. 



2. To provide opportunity for summer study to the students of the 
University. Reasons for summer study for this group of students 
may be described as follows: 

a. To lighten the study load during the regular school year, but 
still meet the yearly requirements of the program. 

b. To shorten the normal time required for a degree. 

c. To take preparatory work. 

d. To make up deficiencies caused by failure in certain courses. 

e. To take additional work beyond the degree and yet complete 
a program within the normal time. 

The accomplishment of any one of the five objectives listed above will 
depend on the specific subjects offered during any summer session. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Registration For all new students a personal interview with a staff 
member of the University is necessary. Registration procedures will 
be explained at this time. A student taking courses for transfer of credit 
to another institution must submit a letter of authorization from that 
institution with his registration. This procedure should be followed each 
semester regardless of previous attendance. 



Evening Division Regular Academic Year TUITION 

Application fee — payable only once at the initial time of application. rrro 

Not refundable $10.00 AND FEES 

Tuition — per credit hour or equivalent 40.00 

This includes the Student Activity Fee which covers subscription 

to the University newspaper, use of the Student Center, and helps 

to defray cost of all student activities and facilities. 
Change of registration — assessed for changing courses or sections 

after the completion of registration 5.00 

Summer Terms 

For information regarding both Day and Evening summer sessions, 
request the Summer School Bulletin. 

Other Charges 

Late registration — assessed for failure to complete registration 

and/or payment of fees prior to the opening night of classes. ^^ 

Not refundable 5.00 ZO 

Laboratory and Breakage fees — payable each semester by students 

registering for courses requiring the laboratory fee. See Course 

Description for specific amounts. Not refundable. 
Make-up Examination — assessed when a student is permitted to 

take an end-of-semester examination at other than the scheduled 

time except for conflicts caused by the examination schedule 

5.00 
Make-up Test — assessed when a student is permitted to make up 

an announced test during the semester 3.00 

Auditors — the fee for a student auditor in any course or courses is 

the same as if the courses were taken for credit. 
Graduation fee — assessed regardless of participation in exercises 

and due before March 1st of year of graduation. Not refundable. 

35.00 
Transcript of academic work — no charge for the first one; thereafter, 

per copy 100 

Tuition, fees, and other University charges are payable at time of regis- PAYMENT 

tration. Payment made by check or money order should be made pay- Qp g||_L5 

able to University of New Haven. 

The University also accepts payments by use of BankAmericard and 
Master Charge. 

As a convenience to those who desire to spread their payments out 
over a period of time, a deferred education payment plan is available 
to full-time students and to part-time students carrying six or more 
credits or the equivalent. Details of this plan are available at the 
Business Office. general information 



Summer Terms: Because of the short duration of the summer terms, 
the total amount due for tuition and fees is due and payable at time of 
registration for each term. 



FAILURE 
TO PAY 



The University withholds the giving of grades, the issuance of tran- 
scripts, and the granting of honorable dismissal to any student w/hose 
account is in arrears. 



REFUND 
OF TUITION 



24 



Registration does not carry with it the right of a refund of tuition in 
cases of withdrawal. No deduction is made for temporary absence from 
classes, nor is any refund made if a student is suspended or dismissed. 
Requests for withdrawal should be made in person through the Eve- 
ning Office. If this is not possible, a letter requesting withdrawal must 
be sent to the Director of Continuing Education. Telephone requests 
cannot be honored. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The following policy applies to students who seek refunds: 

A. Full-time students — No refunds are granted to any student who 
voluntarily withdraws from the University. In certain cases of invol- 
untary withdrawal before the end of the fifth week of a semester, 
some refund up to 50% of tuition only may be made, the exact 
amount of which is determined by the University. These cases are 
limited to instances of involuntary withdrawal involving: 

(1) the death or protracted serious illness of a student 

(2) involuntary induction into military service 

All requests in cases of the above must be in writing and must be 
documented. The date of the request for withdrawal will serve as the 
basis for computing any refund. There is no refund after the fifth week 
of a semester. 

B. Part-time students — Tuition only is refunded or canceled by one of 
two methods upon receipt of formal withdrawal request before the end 
of the fourth week of a semester. 

1. Percentage basis for any reason during the first four weeks of a 
semester: 

80% of semester tuition — 1st week 
60% of semester tuition — 2nd week 
40% of semester tuition — 3rd week 
20% of semester tuition — 4th week 
0% of semester tuition after 4th week 



2. Pro-rata basis of tuition before end of fourth week involving: 

(a) death or protracted serious illness of a student 

(b) involuntary induction into military service 

(c) transfer or change in work initiated by employer that pre- 
cludes meeting class schedules. 

All requests for refund must be made in writing and include necessary 
documentation. 



C. Summer session students — In cases of withdrawal from a course or 
courses within the first week of each term, a refund of 50% of tuition 
only is made. There is no refund of summer tuition after the first week. 
The foregoing policy is intended to protect the University since the 
University plans its expenses and bases its budget upon full collection 
of tuition and fees from all registered students, and assumes the obli- 
gation of supplying instruction and other services throughout the year. 



25 



Because of the difficulty of determining long-range economic trends, 
the University reserves the right to make such changes in its tuition, 
fees, and other costs and in regulations, facilities, and class offerings 
which, in its judgment, are considered necessary and just, and to apply 
such changes to students already in attendance as well as to new 
students. No change in charges, however, is made retroactive. 



CHANGES 

IN ARRANGEMENTS 





SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

DOUGLAS ROBILLARD, DEAN 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 



MAJORS IN: 

BIOLOGY 

CHEMISTRY 

ECONOMICS 

ENGLISH 

HISTORY 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOCIAL WELFARE 



Bachelor of Science Degree 

MAJORS IN: 

BIOLOGY 

CHEMISTRY 

FIRE SCIENCE ADMINISTRATION 

FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

Associate in Science Degree 

MAJORS IN: 

GENERAL STUDIES 



ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 



The School of Arts and Sciences offers a four-year college curriculum 
leading to Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. Core 
requirements for all Bachelor programs are listed below. The require- 
ment for graduation is 120-126 semester hours. 



BACHELOR 
DEGREES 



28 



APPLICATION 
TO THE PROGRAM 



Because some employers and some graduate schools in scientific and 
technical fields indicate a preference for the Bachelor of Science 
degree, this degree is offered in Chemistry, Biology, and Fire Science. 
If the student wishes to obtain a Bachelor of Science, he may do so by 
taking a heavier concentration in the sciences. Details of these pro- 
grams are to be obtained from the department chairmen. 

A student may, but need not, choose a minor in addition to his major 
field of study. Most minors consist of 18 hours. The student should 
consult his major advisor. 

An applicant for admission to the Arts & Sciences Program must be a 
graduate of an approved secondary school or the equivalent. While 
no set program of high school subjects is prescribed, an applicant must 
meet the standard of the University in respect to the high school 
average and present 15 acceptable units of satisfactory work, includ- 
ing 9 or more units of college preparatory subjects. Satisfactory scores 
on College Entrance Examination Board (S.A.T.) or American College 
Testing Program tests (A.C.T.) are required. 



MATRICULATION Matriculation for Bachelor Degree Students who have completed at 

least two semesters or equivalent (30 academic credit hours) with a 
minimum quality point ratio of 2.00 may apply for matriculation for 
the Bachelor degree. 



ADMISSION 
REQUIREMENTS 



Admission will be limited to applicants who have given evidence of 
capacity and motivation adequate for upper division work as determined 
by the department chairman. 

A cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.00 is required in a 
Bachelor of Arts student's major field. 



AMERICAN 
STUDIES 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



A Bachelor of Arts major in American Studies is offered jointly by the 
departments in Humanities and Social Sciences. This program consists 
of a series of interdepartrhental seminars emphasizing various aspects 
of contemporary American civilization and culture and stresses inde- 
pendent reading and research by the student. For further information 
contact the chairman of the appropriate department. 



Biology The program prepares the student for medical, dental, veter- 
inary, or other professional training, as well as for a graduate program 
in biology and in allied health fields. Students in other disciplines, 
allied or not related, frequently choose biology as a minor area of con- 
centration. This is particularly true for those majoring in the social and 
behavioral sciences. 

For those not seeking specific professional specialization, employment 
opportunities for biologists are found in industry, federal, state, and 
municipal organizations, hospitals, research and technical laboratories, 
as well as in teaching. New employment areas are appearing where a 
knowledge of biology and a second discipline are required. Examples 
of these are Bioengineering, Psychobiology, Environmental Science, 
Pharmaceutical and Biological Sales, Management in Biological Busi- 
ness, Oceanography, Forensic Science, and many more related to 
biology, such as Pharmacology and Toxicology. 

Prospective biology majors or those wishing to follow a Pre- Medical, 
Pre-Dental, Pre-Veterinary, or Allied Health Program should consult 
with a member of the Biology Department before or soon after regis- 
tration for their first term. 



BIOLOGY 



29 



Prospective biology majors should consult with the department chair- 
man during their first term. 

Biology majors are required to take SC 251-252, CH 105-106, M 115- 
116 or M 117-118, SC 201, SC 301, PH 103-104, PH 105-106, SC 
308, SC 307 or SC 309, SC 222, SC 361-362, SC 591-592, SC 595, 
and four elective courses. The language choice in order of preference 
is German, French, Italian, Spanish, or Russian. One year of an elemen- 
tary language is required, plus one semester at the intermediate level 
which should be a course in scientific literature. 



Chemistry This major is offered for those students who wish to avail 
themselves of the many career opportunities in the general field of 
chemistry and also for those who wish to go on to graduate work with 
a broad liberal education and a thorough grounding in a scientific 
discipline. 

Career opportunities exist in the following areas; Management, tech- 
nical purchasing or sales, research, product control, production, and 
product development in the chemical, pharmaceutical, or related 
industries; analysis and research in forensic science, medicine, ocean- 
ography, and the environmental sciences; sales and product develop- 
ment in the laboratory equipment field; and teaching. 



CHEMISTRY 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



In addition to the regular Chemistry programs, a student may elect 
options in the following areas: Biology, Business, Engineering, Environ- 
mental Studies, Fire Science, Forensic Science, Pre-Dental, Pre-Medical, 
or Pre-Veterinary. Courses in each option are taken instead of the 
normal electives. For details of the options, the department chairman 
should be consulted. 

A major in Chemistry must complete the following courses: Six to 
twelve semester hours of German, Russian, French, or the equiva- 
lent, PH 108, 209, 210; CH 105, 106, 211, 301, 302, 341, 401, 431, 
432, 451, 452 or CH 400 elective. In addition he is required to take 
Mathematics through M 203. 



30 



ECONOMICS Economics An economics major within a broad program of liberal 

studies provides a preparation for higher positions in business and 
industry today. It is also excellent preparation for graduate work in 
business administration or for graduate study in economics itself. 

Economics majors will be required to take, in addition to EC 133-134 
(Principles of Economics I and II), a total of 27 semester hours, includ- 
ing EC 336 (Money and Banking), EC 320 (Mathematical Methods in 
Economics), EC 340 (Microeconomic Analysis), EC 445 (Macroeco- 
nomic Analysis), and EC 450 (Thesis). Beyond these requirements, a 
flexible program may be devised for each major to fit the student's 
needs and interests. With the approval of the chairman or some other 
member of the department, a student may elect suitable courses in 
other departments to fulfill the semester hour requirement. 

Economics majors are required to take A 111 (Accounting), M 127 
(Finite Mathematics), and BA 216 (Statistics). 



ENGLISH 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



English The study of English as one of the humanistic disciplines 
offers a solid foundation for graduate work and a liberal education, 
developing abilities to think critically and write effectively. 

The course requirement for English majors is E 113, 206, 211-212, 
213-214, and 21 additional semester hours in course work beyond the 
sophomore level. While no specific courses are required, students will 
balance their work between period courses and other offerings of the 
English department. Their major programs must be approved by an 
adviser who is a member of the English department. 

Prerequisites for courses numbered 300 should include E 113, E 
206 and E 211-212. Students not majoring in English who wish to take 
courses numbered above 300 should have permission of advisers. 



English majors are responsible for meeting the foreign language require- 
ment — the 101102 and 201-202 courses in a language, or compe- 
tence in the language equivalent to the second semester of the inter- 
mediate level. 




FIRE SCIENCE 
ADMINISTRATION 



FIRE SCIENCE 
TECHNOLOGY 



32 



FIRE SCIENCE 
PROGRAMS 



Fire Science Administration A student earning a Bachelor's degree 
in Fire Science Administration is able to apply modern management 
techniques to the development and operation of a fire department. His 
programs include courses such as accounting, cost control, industrial 
relations, contracts and specifications, techniques of management, and 
collective bargaining. 

Fire Science is a cross disciplinary field. It adapts courses from chem- 
istry, mathematics, accounting, business administration, industrial 
engineering, civil engineering, and, in its arson investigation courses, 
criminal justice, as well as courses in fire prevention and supression. 

Fire Science Technology A program leading to a Bachelor's degree in 
Fire Science Technology is an upper-level two-year program, attracting 
students with degrees in fire science programs from the community 
colleges, continuing the educational development begun there. The 
stress is first of all on fire prevention. Many of the courses cover vari- 
ous engineering fields adapted to the problems that will confront the 
fire technologist. The essentials of fire chemistry, dynamics, statics, the 
way in which materials behave under various conditions of stress 
including heat, process and transportation hazards, the design of 
industrial structures and conveyances for the maximum protection of 
the worker and the public, are essential areas of study. Courses in fire 
suppression play a role almost equal to that of fire prevention. These 
include an investigation of fire suppression fluids and systems, hydrau- 
lics and thermodynamics. The student who completes this program is 
a planner, a designer of fire prevention systems, a judge of facilities 
and equipment. 

Typical Fire Technology and Administration Associate Degree Program 
to be Completed at a Technical College Students desiring admission 
to the fire science administration or fire science technology programs 
leading to a bachelor of science degree must meet the following 
requirements: The student must have an associate degree in fire tech- 
nology and administration as it is offered at the technical colleges or 
the equivalent. 





Sem. 


Sem. 


Professional Courses 


Hrs. 


General Courses Hrs. 


Intro, to Fire Technology 


4 


English 1, II, & III 7 


Municipal Fire Administration 


2 


Mathematics 6 


Building Construction 


4 


Science (Integrated Science or Physics 


Industrial Processes and Hazards 


2 
2 


and Chemistry) 6 


Hydraulic Technology 


Social or Behavioral Sciences 8 


Water Supply and Sprinklers 


2 


Electives 3-6 


Fire Investigation 


2 





Fire Fighting Strategy 


2 


30-33 


Professional Electives 


10-16 





UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



30-36 



Fire Sc 


:ience Administration 


FIFTH 
Sem. 


YEAR 




Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


FS301 


Essentials of Fire Chemistry 


3 


FS401 


Research Project 


2 




(same as CH 331) 




FS402 


Arson Investigation w/Lab 


3 


FS401 


Research Project 


1 




(same as CH 411) 




M115 


Mathematical Analysis 1 or 
M 127 Finite Mathematics 


3 


BA227 


Risk and Insurance 


3 


Alll 


Introductory Accounting 


3 












SIXTH YEAR 






EC 133 


Principles of Economics 


3 


IE 223 


Personnel Administration 


3 




Elective 


3 


IE 233 


Cost Control 


3 


FS303 


Fire Protection Fluids and 
Systems (same as CH 332) 


3 




Elective 


3 






SEVENTH YEAR 






M116 


Math Analysis II or M 128 


3 


FS403 


Process & Transp. Hazards 


3 




Statistics 




PA 405 


Collective Bargaining in thi 




BA125 


Management & Organization 


3 




Public Sector 


3 


PH104 


General Physics 


3 


CE407 


Contracts & Specifications 


3 


PH106 


General Physics Lab 


1 












EIGHTH YEAR 






BA231 


Industrial Relations 


3 


IE 105 


Intro, to Computers or Elective 3 




Electives 


6 










B.S. 1 


Degree = 


= 129 Credits 




Fire Science Teclinology 


FIFTH 


YEAR 










Sem. 






Sem. 




Fall 


Hrs. 




Spring 


Hrs. 


FS301 


Essentials of Fire Chemistry 


3 


FS401 


Research Project 


2 




w/Lab (same as CH 331) 




FS402 


Arson Investigation w/Lab 


3 


FS302 


Principles of EST w/Lab 


3 




(same as CH 441) 




FS401 


Research Project 


1 


EE336 


Instrumentation of Elec. 




MT200 


Engineering Materials 


3 




w/Lab 


3 






SIXTH YEAR 






M117 


Calculus 1 


3 


EE223 


Principles of Electrical En- 






Elective 


3 




gineering 


3 


FS303 


Fire Protection Fluids & Sys 




ME 204 


Dynamics 


3 




tems w/Lab (same as 






Elective 


3 




CH 332) 


3 









SEVENTH YEAR 

FS304 Fire Detection Control w/Lab 3 FS 403 

CE201 Statics 3 

M118 Calculus II 4 FS404 

CE306 



Process & Transp. Hazards 

w/Lab 3 

Special Hazards Control w/Lab 3 

Hydraulics 3 



ME 301 Thermodynamics 
PH210 Physics III or Physics Elective 
Elective 



EIGHTH YEAR 

3 
3 
3 



Elective 



FIRE SCIENCE 
ADMINISTRATION 



33 



FIRE SCIENCE 
TECHNOLOGY 



B.S. Degree - 129 Credits 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 



HISTORY 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



34 



History The study of history provides excellent preparation for those 
seeking professional careers in public service and general administra- 
tion. This major also builds a good foundation for graduate study in 
various areas, such as law and teaching. 

All History majors w/lll be required to take in addition to HS 111-112 
and HS 211-212 the following courses: HS 321 (History of Ancient 
Greece and Rome) or HS 317 (Renaissance and Reformation), and a 
course in Far Eastern History (HS 231 or HS 406 or HS 409). HS 416 
(Senior Seminar) is required of all majors. The major program con- 
sists of 36 hours to be determined with the advisor. 

Political Science A Political Science major provides the student with 
an appropriate foundation for the study of politics or international 
relations at the graduate level, as well as the study of law, while at the 
same time it may provide the basis for a career in the electoral 
process, teaching, communications, the civil service, or the foreign 
service of the United States. All Political Science majors or potential 
Political Science majors should discuss job electives and goals with 
the department chairman at an early stage in order to select relevant 
courses in a total program. 

Only four required courses are specified for Political Science majors. 
The flexibility of this program will permit majors to take courses within 
the scope of their career goals (Law School, Graduate School, govern- 
ment employment) and sub-discipline interests (American Political 
Institutions and Processes, Constitutional Law and Judicial Behavior, 
International Relations, Comparative Government and Politics, Political 
Theory). 

A Political Science major is required to take a total of 36 semester 
hours in the Political Science Department, which must include PS 
121, 122, 332 and 499 or 500. All prelaw Political Science majors 
should take Introductory Accounting (A 111-112) as an elective 
and all others should take Statistics for Behavioral Science (Psychology 
301) or Statistics (Business Administration 216) as an elective to 
complete the major. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Psychology Graduate study leading to the Master's degree is minimal 
for professional status in Psychology. A solid foundation for such 
graduate work is defined by a broadly-based liberal education. 

Major requirements, under advisement, include P 111, P 301, P 305, 
P 321, P 350 and twenty-one hours of advanced Psychology courses, 
SC 121, SC 123, SO 113, PHL 111 or 124 and one college-level mathe- 
matics course. Only two 200-level Psychology courses may be counted 
toward the major. 



Sociology Students who wish to understand the intellectual tradition 
that has focused on the description and explanation of hunnan society 
will be interested in a sociology major. It requires a humanistic orienta- 
tion while regarding empirical research as the major means of extend- 
ing knowledge about man. A sociology major may continue his work in 
graduate school or may find employment in such fields as govern- 
ment service, personnel work, advertising, and industry. 

Major requirements are SO 113, 1 14, 221, 250, 413, 440 or 450, P 301 
or BA 216, and 15 additional semester hours in sociology at least 9 
of which must be taken from the 300 level or above. No more than 3 
semester hours towards a major will be accepted from social work 
courses. 



SOCIOLOGY 



Social Welfare Students who wish to go into Social Work and related 
areas may take a concentration in Social Welfare. The program trains 
students to work with people, both individually and in groups, per- 
ceiving problem situations and dealing with these in a professional 
manner. Graduates must have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills 
common to the profession at the baccalaureate level. They must also 
be aware of the overall problems confronting society today and the 
position social work takes in response to these problems. 

There are employment opportunities in federal, state, and private 
organizations, or the student may wish to continue his education in a 
graduate school of social work. 

Major requirements are: Math elective, SO 113, 114, 250, P 111, 301, 
SW 220, 350-351, 340, 415-416, 401-402, 475. 



SOCIAL WELFARE 



35 



Teacher Education The University of New Haven has recently received 
formal approval from the State of Connecticut Commission for Higher 
Education and the Connecticut State Department of Education for an 
accredited Teacher Education Program. Selected teaching areas will be 
offered for undergraduate students who can qualify for Teacher Certifi- 
cation and the State of Connecticut Provisional Teaching Certificate. 
Students interested in a teaching career should meet with the Director, 
Teacher Education Program, as early as possible in their college career. 



TEACHER EDUCATION 




CORE 

REQUIREMENTS 

FOR 

BACHELOR PROGRAMS 



These course requirements and those prescribed by the students' major 
department must be met by all Arts and Science students. Only courses 
offered by Arts and Science departments can be used to satisfy the 
core requirements. 



ENGLISH AND HUMANITIES 

English Composition 
English Composition and Literature 
Literature 
*Fine Arts 



36 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Western Civilization I and II 6 

Philosophy 3 

Psychology 3 

Political Science 3 

Sociology 3 

Economics 3 

A course chosen from any Social Science department 3 

24 



fSCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Science 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 semesters 
Total 

*Fine Arts includes Art, Music, and Theater. 

t Students must elect at least one semester of a laboratory science. 



11-12 



53-54 



BACHELOR 
PROGRAMS 


E113 
HSlll 


Fall 

English Composition 
Western Civilization 1 
Foreign Language or 
elective 


FIRST YEAR 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 E206 
3 HS112 

3 
SECOND YEAR 


Spring 

English Comp. & Lit. 
Western Civilization II 
Foreign Language or 
elective 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 

3 


W HAVEN 




Mathematics or Science 
•Eiectives 


3 
6 


Mathematics or Science 
*Electives 


3 
6 



Biology SC 251-252, CH 105-106, M 115-116 or M 117-118. Omit 
Foreign Language, Elective and HS 111-112 in freshman year. 

Economics and History PS 121, SO 113, P 111. 

Chemistry M 117-118, CH 105-106, German or Russian. 

TOTAL hours required for the Bachelor of Arts Degree— 120-126 hours, depending on major 
selected. 

* Choices should be determined by the requirements of the student's major. 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
— BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY 

COURSE OUTLINES 



Details of this program can be obtained before registration from the 
department chairman. 

A layout of the following programs may be obtained from the Office of 
Continuing Education,: Biology, Economics, English, History, Chemistry, 
Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Social Welfare. 



ASSOCIATE IN 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

GENERAL STUDIES 



38 



It is recognized that there are students who desire a general education. 
They include those who wish a college degree in the field of general 
studies but do not desire a bachelor degree. Also, there are those who 
have not selected their field of specialization but desire to start with 
education of a general nature. The general studies program provides an 
Associate degree which may be the basis for later transfer into a 
Bachelor degree program. 

The total hours required are distributed as follows: 



FIRST YEAR 

Sem. 
Fall Hrs. 

E113 English Composition 3 E206 

E114 Speech 3 Pill 

HSlll Western Civ. 1 3 HS112 

SECOND YEAR 

E201 World Literature I 3 E202 

SO 113 Sociology 3 

Science or Math 3 



E211 
E213 
EC133 



Survey of Eng. Lit. I or 
Survey of Am. Lit. I 
Prin. of Economics I 
Elective or 
Foreign Language 



THIRD YEAR 



E212 
E214 



Spring 

Eng. Comp. & Literature 

Psychology 

Western Civ. II 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 



World Literature II 3 

Science or Math 3 

Elective 3 

Survey of Eng. Lit. II or 

Survey of Am. Lit. II 3 

Elective 3 

Elective or 

Foreign Language 3 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



FOURTH YEAR 

PHLlll Probs. of Philosophy or 
PHL113 History of Philosophy 3 

Elective 3 

Electives totaling 12 semester hours are to be selected from any credit offerings of the Univer- 
sity for which the student satisfies prerequisites. 

TOTAL hours required for Associate in Science Degree— 60 Semester Hours. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



WARREN J. SMITH, DEAN 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



ACCOUNTING WITH CONCENTRATIONS IN 

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 
COMMUNICATIONS 
ECONOMICS 
FINANCE 

GENERAL MANAGEMENT 
HOTEL ADMINISTRATION 
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 

INCLUDING COMPUTER SCIENCE 
MANAGEMENT 
MARKETING 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
RETAILING 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH PROGRAMS IN 

LAW ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION 

FORENSIC SCIENCE 

CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION 



Associate in Science Degree 



MAJORS IN: 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
CORRECTIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
HOTEL ADMINISTRATION 
LAW ENFORCEMENT 
RETAILING 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



40 



GENERAL MANAGEMENT 
ACCOUNTING 

COMMUNICATIONS 
ECONOMICS 

FINANCE 
HOTEL ADMINISTRATION 



INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS 



MANAGEMENT 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



The School of Business Administration provides programs to prepare 
students for (1) several areas of business and economics, (2) the 
broad field of criminal justice, and (3) public administration. The 
courses of study combine strong professional programs with compre- 
hensive background in the liberal arts. 

The School of Business Administration considers it axiomatic that, 
over the long run, a graduate is better prepared for the business 
world when his collegiate business background has been comprehen- 
sive rather than highly specialized. Consequently, only a limited amount 
of specialization is intended in the various departmental majors. 

General Management — is the field generally chosen by those students 
who do not have a particularized objective. 

Accounting — is selected by those who wish to make this their career, 
including possibly ultimate attainment of the Certified Public Account- 
ant license. Accounting has long been recognized as a preferred route 
to management responsibilities in many fields of business. 
The student has the option of selecting the Financial Accounting Con- 
centration or the Managerial Accounting Concentration. 

Communications — The opportunities to the graduate are unlimited. A 
career field may be chosen in any one of several media. 

Economics — is a broad field in which specialists are called for by 
industry and government particularly to staff various types of research 
activities. This major is also one that would be considered by the stu- 
dent contemplating future graduate work or attendance at law school. 

Finance — is one of the business disciplines that has extensive appli- 
cation to businesses generally. 

Hotel Administration — is selected by those who wish to make this their 
career. There are numerous opportunities available to the graduate 
in the institutional field, restaurant management, hotel administration, 
and tourism. 

International Business — A comparatively new field of study dealing 
with the problems of developing and adopting business practices for 
the purpose of operating within different economies, different political 
systems and different cultures. Selected by students who wish to make 
this iheir career. 

Management — this provides the student with an understanding of the 
business organization and the concepts underlying the managerial 
processes. The graduate has numerous opportunities available to him 
in many fields of business. 



Marketing — is a widely recognized phase of business that presents 
unmatched opportunities to the qualified graduate, depending on 
whether his interests are in the selling, managing, or analytical phases. 



MARKETING 



Operations Management- — is a growing profession. Its practices make 
increased use of quantitative analysis in the scientific management of 
business. Students with specific interest in data processing usually 
select this field. 



OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 



Public Administration The Public Administration program is designed 
to prepare the students for careers in public affairs (government service, 
politics), governmental research, graduate school, or to give the student 
an insight, generally, into the various governmental organizations, 
functions, and methodology which are used to both determine and 
provide the services to the people. 

On the premise that the basic skills required in managerial positions 
in public service have much in common with those of the manager 
in private industry, the student follows much the same program as 
other business students during the first two years. 

For his junior and senior years, the student majoring in Public Admin- 
istration will arrange his program under the guidance of his Depart- 
mental Chairman, so as to meet his defined objectives. A wide selection 
of courses is available in the School of Business Administration and 
the School of Engineering. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



41 



Retailing — is selected by those who wish to make this field of business 
their career. Available to the graduate are varied opportunities in sell- 
ing, merchandising and advertising. 



RETAILING 



Criminal Justice Four-year bachelor degree programs in criminal 
justice are offered. They are planned for high school graduates inter- 
ested in any of the many careers in the administration and operation 
of criminal justice agencies on the federal, state, and local levels of 
government. Three programs are offered: Law Enforcement Administra- 
tion, Forensic Science, and Correctional Administration. 



CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 



Law Enforcement Administration This program prepares students for 
administrative careers with federal, state, and local law enforcement 
agencies or public and private security forces. Law enforcement admin- 
istration is concerned with the activities and behavior of people in 



LAW ENFORCEMENT 
ADMINISTRATION 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



terms of maintaining law and order, providing needed services, and 
protecting life and property. The program provides basic studies in 
the liberal arts and public administration as well as courses pertain- 
ing to law enforcement administration and criminal justice. 



FORENSIC 
SCIENCE 



Forensic Science This program prepares students for careers as 
forensic scientists, criminologists, or evidence technicians in the field of 
criminal investigation and identification. The program includes basic 
studies in the natural sciences, liberal arts, and public administration 
as well as courses in forensic science and criminal justice. 



42 



CORRECTIONAL 
ADMINISTRATION 



Correctional Administration This program prepares students for ad- 
ministrative careers with federal, state, local, and private correctional 
agencies. Correctional administration is concerned with the institu- 
tional and noninstitutional treatment of offenders. The program pro- 
vides basic studies in the liberal arts and public administration as 
well as courses pertaining to correctional administration and criminal 
justice. 



ADMISSION 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



A student with a two-year degree and at least a 2.0 QPR will receive 
transfer credit for as many hours as the degree requires. No more 
than 60 semester hours from a two-year college will be accepted, 
except by authorization of the dean of the school in which the student 
is enrolled. The maximum number of semester hours of transfer credit 
from any source is 90 semester hours. It is not necessary that a trans- 
ferred course correspond to one in the University catalog. 

Applicants should be graduates of an approved secondary school with 
an academic record deemed creditable by this university. A minimum 
of 15 acceptable units of secondary work, preferably in college pre- 
paratory subjects, with 4 units of English, is expected. Satisfactory 
scores on College Entrance Examination Board Tests or American 
College Testing Program Tests are required. Non-college credit 
courses are available to remedy deficiencies. 

College transfer applicants will have their official academic transcripts 
and records evaluated on the general basis that work at an accredited 
two or lour year college of a "C" or better quality will be accepted 
when a comparable course is offered at this university. Transfer credit 
is not confirmed until the student has completed successfully one 
semester at this university. Transfer credit from a two year institution 
will not be allowed in excess of one half of the semester hours required 
for graduation here. 



Applicants from the Armed Services and other mature individuals are 
invited to inquire about the possibility of crediting examinations in 
lieu of certain course work. 



The typical degree programs in the various majors follow. If a student 
has special interests not provided for by these programs, an endeavor 
will be made to prepare a specific program for him (e.g. combined 
programs in Business and Chemistry). 

The programs provided in the School of Business are divided into three 
general categories: (1) the business majors which are presented next 
below, (2) the programs in law enforcement, and (3) the program in 
public administration. 

All business students take similar core courses in business, the 
allied social sciences, and certain other liberal arts subjects. Then 
several courses are taken in the major business field selected by the 
student. The program is rounded out with electives. 

A student working for an Associate in Science in Business Administra- 
tion diploma is required to complete the 60 semester hours of pre- 
scribed courses of the first two years with an accumulative quality 
point average of 2.0. 



PROGRAMS 



BUSINESS 
MAJORS 



43 



1 1 


1 


f 


SI 


- 


1 


• 

I 


it 




Hjitain^^-^B 





BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



CORE COURSES 



44 



BACHELOR 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 







FIRST YEAR 






Alll 
E113 
EC 133 


Fall 

Intro. Accounting 1 
English Composition 
Principles of Economics 1 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 A112 
3 E206 
3 EC 134 

SECOND YEAR 


Spring 

Intro. Accounting II 
Eng. Comp. & Lit. 
Principles of Econ. II 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 


BAlOl 
BA118 


Business Law 
Business Mathematics 
Sociology or Psychology or 
Political Science 


3 BA 125 
3 (b){c) BA 128 
IE 105 
3 

THIRD YEAR 


Mgmt. & Organization 
Quant. Tech. in Mgmt. 
Tech. Data Processing 


3 

3 
3 


HS112 


Western Civilization II 
Literature or Philosphy or 

Fine Arts 
Science 


3(a) HS114 
BA105 
3 (a)(d) 
3 

FOURTH YEAR 


Econ. Hist, of the World 
Prin. of Marketing 
Science 


3 
3 
3 


BA216 


Statistics 

Literature or Philosophy or 
Fine Arts 


3(e) 
3 







UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Notes: (a) Accounting majors will defer these subjects and take instead A 111 - A 112 Intro- 
ductory Accounting in their freshman year and A 221-A 222 Intermediate Accounting 
in their Sophomore year. 

(b) Subject to placement examination by the School of Business. 

(c) M 115 Mathematical Analysis I and M 116 Mathematical Analysis II may be sub- 
stituted for the BA 118 and BA 128 sequence. Operations Management, Economics, 
and Finance majors are advised to take the m 115, M 116 sequence. 

(d) Operations Management majors who do not take the M 115 - M 116 sequence should 
defer Literature, Philosophy, or Fine Arts elective until the first semester of the 
junior year, and take instead BA 250 Quantitative Analysis. 

(e) Retailing and Communication majors will take BA 314 Attitude Research Methods. 

Before the end of his sophomore year a student will select a business 
major in consultation with the appropriate chairman or other desig- 
nated adviser. His degree program for his third and fourth years will 
be prepared in consultation with his adviser. This will involve the 
selection of electlves in addition to the required courses. Elective 
means all courses offered by the University. 

Courses offered outside the School of Business Administration or 
the Industrial Engineering Department of the School of Engineering shall 
comprise not less than 50 semester hours of all work taken toward 
graduation. Representative programs follow. A minimum of 120 semes- 
ter hours is required for graduation. 



General Management 

FIFTH YEAR 

Sem. 
Fall Hrs. 

BA113 Finance 3 BA 227 

Business Elective 3 

Sociology or Psychology or 
Political Science 3 

SIXTH YEAR 

BA231 Industrial Relations 3 EC 311 

Business Elective 3 

Elective 3 

SEVENTH YEAR 

BA312 International Business 3 BA510 

Electives 6 

EIGHTH YEAR 

BA512 Seminar 3 

Elective 3 



Spring 

Risk & Insurance 
Electives 



Govt. Reg. of Business 
Electives 



Managerial Economics 
Electives 



Sem. 
Mrs. 

3 

6 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



GENERAL 
MANAGEMENT 



45 



Financial Accounting Concentration 

FIFTH YEAR 



Fall 

A 223 Cost Accounting I 

HS112 Western Civ. II 
BA 113 Business Finance 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 A 224 

3 

3 

HS114 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

Cost Accounting II 3 

Sociology or Psychology or 

Political Science 3 

Economic History of West- 
ern World 3 



FINANCIAL 
ACCOUNTING 



A 331 Advanced Accounting I 

A 335 Income Tax Procedures I 

Elective 



SIXTH YEAR 



A 332 
A 336 



Advanced Accounting II 
Income Tax Procedures II 
Elective 



SEVENTH YEAR 



A 333 Auditing I 3 

BA 510 Managerial Economics 3 

Elective 3 



A 334 



Auditing II 3 

Electives 6 



EIGHTH YEAR 



BA512 Business Seminar 3 

Elective 3 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



MANAGERIAL 
ACCOUNTING 



46 



Managerial Accounting Concentration 
FIFTH YEAR 
Sem. 



A 223 

HS112 

BA113 


Fall 

Cost Accounting 1 
Western Civilization II 
Business finance 


Hrs. 

3 A 224 

3 

3 

HS114 

SIXTH YEAR 


A 331 
A 335 


Advanced Accounting 1 
Income Tax Procedures 1 
Elective 


3 BA250 

3 

3 EC 340 

SEVENTH YEAR 


A 333 
BA510 


Auditing 1 

IVIanagerial Economics 
Elective 


3 A 341 
3 A 339 
3 

EIGHTH YEAR 


BA512 


Business Seminar 
Elective 


3 
3 



Sent. 
Spring Hrs. 

Cost Accounting II 3 

Sociology or Psychology or 

Political Science 3 

Economic History of West- 
ern World 3 



Quantitative Analysis 3 

Microeconomic Analysis 3 



Financial Decision Making 3 

Managerial Accounting 3 
Advanced Management 

Theory 3 



ECONOMICS 



Economics 



EC 336 



Fall 

Money & Banking 
Economics Elective 
Elective 



FIFTH YEAR 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 EC 340 

3 

3 



Spring 

Microeconomic Analysis 
Economics Elective 
Elective 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 



EC 320 



Mathematical Methods in 

Economics 
Electives 



SIXTH YEAR 

EC 445 
3 
6 



Macroeconomic Analysis 
Electives 



Sociology or Psychology or 

Political Science 
Electives 



SEVENTH YEAR 



Economics Elective 
Economics Elective 
Elective 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



BA512 



Business Seminar 
Economics Elective 



EIGHTH YEAR 

3 
3 



Finance 







FIFTH YEAR 






EC 336 


Fall 

Money and Banking 
Business Elective 
Elective 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 BA 230 

3 

3 

SIXTH YEAR 


Spring 

Investments 

Sociology or Psychology or 

Political Science 
Elective 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 
3 


EC 445 
BA113 


Microeconomic Analysis 

Finance 

Elective 


3 BA 229 
3 EC 314 
3 

SEVENTH YEAR 


Financial Management 
Public Finance 
Elective 


3 
3 
3 


BA333 


Advanced Statistics 
Electives 


3 BA227 
6 BA510 

EIGHTH YEAR 


Risk and Insurance 
Managerial Economics 
Elective 


3 
3 
3 


BA512 


Seminar 
Elective 


3 
3 







BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



FINANCE 



47 



Marketing 



MARKETING 







FIFTH YEAR 






BA107 
BA301 


Fall 

Advertising & Promotion 

Retailing 

Elective 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 BA342 

3 

3 

SIXTH YEAR 


Spring 

Marketing Research 
Sociology or Psychology or 

Political Science 
Elective 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 
3 


BA231 
BA315 


Industrial Relations 
Marketing Management 
Elective 


3 BA 302 
3 BA316 
3 

SEVENTH YEAR 


Industrial Marketing 
Sales Managament 
Elective 


3 
3 
3 


BA312 


International Business 
Electives 


3 BA510 
6 

EIGHTH YEAR 


Man-.gerial Economics 
Electives 


3 
6 


BA512 


Business Seminar 

Elective 


3 
3 







BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



OPERATIONS 
MANAGEMENT 



Operations Management 



48 







FIFTH YEAR 






IE 233 


Fall 

Cost Control 
Business Elective 
Elective 


Setn. 
Hrs. 

3 IE 502 

3 

3 

SIXTH YEAR 


Spring 

Operations Research 
Sociology or Psychology or 

Political Science 
Elective 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 
3 


BA231 


Industrial Relations 
Business Elective 
Elective 


3 IE 234 

3 

3 

SEVENTH YEAR 


Production Control 
Electives 


3 
. 6 


IE 508 


Systems Analysis 
Electives 


3 BA510 
6 

EIGHTH YEAR 


Managerial Economics 
Electives 


3 
6 


BA512 


Seminar 


3 
3 








Business Elective 





COMMUNICATIONS 



Communications 



Fall 
E113 English Composition 
PS 121 American Government 
HS112 Western Civilization II 



FIRST YEAR 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 



E206 
HS114 



Spring 

Composition & Literature 
Psychology or Sociology 
Economic History of the West- 
ern World 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 



Psychology or Sociology 
Science/ Math 
BA 125 Management & Organization 



SECOND YEAR 

3 
3 
3 



PA 301 



Elective 
Science/ Math 

Principles of Public Adminis- 
tration 



EC 133 Principles of Economics I 
PA 101 Fundamentals of Communica- 
tions 
Literature or Fine Arts 



THIRD YEAR 

3 



PA 208 
PA 102 



Sound Studio 3 

Problems of Communications 3 
Literature or Fine Arts 3 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



FOURTH YEAR 

PA 210 Film Making Theory & Practice 3 Art 221 

PA 206 Radio Broadcasting 3 PA 220 

Elective 3 PL 111 



Design 

Film Production 

Philosophy 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



PS 368 



Political Sociology 
Restricted Electives 
Electives 



FIFTH YEAR 

3 PS 369 



Public Opinion & Social 

Pressures 
Restricted Elective 
Elective 



COMMUNICATIONS 



P 321 Social Psychology 
BA314 Marketing Research Methods 
Elective 



SIXTH YEAR 

3 
3 
3 



Restricted Electives 
Elective 



49 



Restricted Electives 
Elective 



SEVENTH YEAR 



Elective 



The student will take 5 courses as follows: PA 101, PA 102, PA 208, PA 210 and PA 220. In 
addition he would take 6 restricted electives determined by his advisor. The courses might be 
T. V. Production 1 and 2, Dramatic Writing, Laws of Communication, Government Regulations 
of Media, Comparative Broadcast Systems. These courses emphasize field work. The program 
allows room for a minimum of 6 elective courses. These courses could be taken frort) any 
division under the guidance of his advisor. They would be courses related to his major. Thus 
a student would have 33 hours in his major and a minimum of 18 hours of free electives. 



Law Enforcement Administration 

FIRST YEAR 



E113 
CJlOl 
Pill 



CJ105 
SC121 
SC131 
CJ201 



Fall 

Eng. Comp. 

Intro, to Criminal Justice 

Psychology 



Interpersonal Relations 
Biology I 
Biology Lab I 
Princ. of Invest. 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 
3 



E206 
CJ104 
SO 113 



SECOND YEAR 



CJ221 
SC123 
SC132 
CJ215 



Spring 

Eng. Comp. & Lit. 
Pol. Org. & Adm. . 
Sociology 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 

.. 3 



Juvenile Del. 3 

Human Biology 3 

Biology Lab. II 1 

Intro, to Forensic So. 3 



CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 

ADMINISTRATION 

MAJOR 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 



PS 121 
CJ217 



American Govt. 
Amer. Leg. Sys. I 
Math 



THIRD YEAR 



PS 122 
CJ218 
CJ301 



FOURTH YEAR 



State & Local Govt. 3 

Amer. Leg. Sys. II 3 
Group Dynamics in Criminal 

Justice 3 



LAW ENFORCEMENT 
ADMINISTRATION MAJOR 



P336 
PS 302 
CJ311 



Abnormal Psych. 
Constitutional Law 
Criminology 



IE 346 
PA 301 



Statistical Analysis 
Princ. of Pub. Adm. 
Elective 



50 



EC 133 
CJ107 



Economics I 
Correctional Organization 

and Administration 
Elective 



FIFTH YEAR 



CJ404 
CJ405 



Criminal Law 3 
Seminar in Criminal Justice: 

Violence (1973-74) 3 

Elective 3 



SIXTH YEAR 



IE 105 
CJ498 



Intro, to the Computer/ 

Business 
Research Project or 

Elective 



IE 507 Systems Analysis 3 

CJ 400 Criminal Justice Problems 

Seminar 3 

Elective 3 



SEVENTH YEAR 

3 CJ 402 

3 
TOTAL — Required for the Bachelor of Science Degree: 122 Semester Hours 



SO 450 
CJ501 



Research Seminar 
Criminal Justice Internship 
or Elective 



Police-Comm. Rel. 
Elective 



CORRECTIONAL 

ADMINISTRATION 

MAJOR 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Correctional Administration 



E113 
Pill 
SO 113 



Fall 

Eng. Comp. 
Psychology 
Sociology 



FIRST YEAR 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 



E206 
CJ107 
CJlOl 



Spring 

Eng. Comp. & Lit. 
Corr. Org. & Admin. 
Intro, to Criminal Justice 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 



PS 121 Amer. Govt, and Politics 

CJ217 Amer. Legal Sys. I 

SC 121 Biology I 

SC 131 Biology Lab I 



CJ311 Criminology 

CI 109 Correctional Treatment 

Programs 
P315 Psychology of Learning 



SECOND YEAR 



PS 122 

CJ218 
SC123 
SC132 



THIRD YEAR 



CJ221 
CJ301 



FOURTH YEAR 



PS 302 Constitutional Law 

CJ 302 Betiaviorism: Applications in 

Criminal Justice 
CJ 105 Interpersonal Relations 



CJ308 
PA 301 



State & Local Govt. & 
Politics 

Amer. Leg. Sys. II 
Human Biology 
Biology Lab II 



Corr. Counseling 
Princ. of Pub. Adm. 
Elective 



Juvenile Del. 3 
Group Dynamics in Criminal 

Justice 3 

Abnormal Psych. 3 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 



CORRECTIONAL 

ADMINISTRATION 

MAJOR 



51 



FIFTH YEAR 



Math 

Economics 

Elective 



IE 346 
CJ309 
SO 450 



Statistical Analysis 
Probation and Parole 
Research Seminar 



SIXTH YEAR 



P216 
CJ400 



CJ405 



Developmental Psychology 
Criminal Justice Problems 

Seminar 
Seminar in Criminal Justice: 

Violence (1973-74) 



IE 507 
P361 
P370 



Systems Analysis 
Physiological Psychology 
Psychology of Personality 



SEVENTH YEAR 



CJ501 



Internship 
Elective 



CJ404 



Criminal Law 
Elective 



TOTAL — Required for the Bachelor of Science Degree: 122 Semester Hours. 
Evening courses offered on the main campus meet one evening each week from 7:00 to 9:45 
p.m. Extension courses conducted in New Britain, Waterbury, and New London generally 
meet one evening each week from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. 

However, a number of courses conducted on the mam campus and extension courses in New 
Britain, Waterbury, and New London are offered on a special basis one day each week. Under 
this arrangement, the course meets one morning each week from 9:00 to 11:45 a.m. and again 
the same evening from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. Students may attend either lecture fhat week depend- 
ing upon their work schedule. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



52 



BUSINESS 


Criminal Justice 










ADMINISTRATION 


Forensic Science Major 
















FIRST YEAR 






CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 


E113 
CJlOl 

SC121 
SC131 


Fall 

English Composition 
Introduction to Criminal 

Justice 
Biology 1 
Biology Lab 1 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 
3 
1 


E206 

CJ104 
SC122 
SC132 


Spring 

English Composition & 

Literature 
Police Organization & Admin 
Biology II 
Biology Lab II 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

1. 3 
3 

1 


FORENSIC SCIENCE 






10 






10 


MAJOR 






SECOND YEAR 








CHIOS 
CJ102 

PH103 
PH105 


General Cliemistry 
Principles of Criminal Investi- 
gation 
General Ptiysics 1 
General Physics Lab 1 


4 

3 
3 
1 

11 


CH106 
CI 215 

PH104 
PH106 


General Chemistry 11 
Introduction to Forensic 

Science 

General Physics II 

General Physics Lab II 


4 

3 
. 3 

1 

11 








THIRD YEAR 








M115 
CJ217 
SC361 


Mathematical Analysis 1 
American Legal System 1 
Biochemistry 1 w/Lab 


3 
3 
4 

10 
FOURTH 


M 116 
CJ 218 
SC362 

YEAR 


Mathematical Analysis II 
American Legal System II 
Biochemistry II w/Lab 


3 
3 
4 

10 




CH104 
CHIOS 


Elementary Organic Chemistry 
Elementary Organic Chemistry 


3 


SC421 
SO 113 


Toxicology w/Lab 
Sociology 


4 
3 



SC419 



Lab 1 

Pharmacology w/Lab 4 



CJ 303 Forensic Science Lab I 
CH211 Quantitative Analysis w/Lab 
Pill Psychology 



FIFTH YEAR 



CJ311 
CJ304 
CH341 



Criminology 3 

Forensic Science Lab II 3 
Instrumental Methods Analysis 

w/Lab 4 

10 



CH301 



Organic Chemistry w/Lab 
Elective 



SIXTH YEAR 



CH302 



Organic Chemistry w/Lab 
Elective 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



SEVENTH YEAR 



CH431 
CH351 



Physical Chemistry w/Lab 4 

Qualitative Organic Cliemistry 4 



CH432 
SC313 



Physical Chemistry w/Lab 
Scientific Photographic 
Documentation 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



CJ501. Internship or Elective 



Law Enforcement 



EIGHTH YEAR 

3 







FIRST YEAR 


E113 
CJlOl 
Pill 


Fall 

Eng. Comp. 

Intro, to Criminal Justice 

Psychology 


Sem. 
Mrs. 

3 E206 
3 CJ 104 
3 SO 113 

SECOND YEAR 


CJ 105 
SC121 
SC131 
CJ201 


Interpersonal Relations 
Biology 1 
Biology Lab 1 
Princ. of Invest. 


3 CJ221 
3 SC 123 
1 SC 132 
3 CJ215 

THIRD YEAR 


PS 121 
CJ217 


American Govt. 
Amer. Leg. Sys. 1 
Math 


3 PS 122 
3 CJ218 
3 CJ305 

FOURTH YEAR 


P336 
PS 302 


Abnormal Psych. 
Constitutional Law 


3 
3 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

Eng. Comp. & Lit 3 

Pol. Org. & Adm 3 

Sociology 3 

Juvenile Del 3 

Human Biology 3 

Biology Lab II 1 

Intro, to Forensic So. 3 



State & Local Govt. 3 

Amer. Leg. Sys. II 3 
Group Dynamics in Criminal 

Justice 3 



CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 

ASSOCIATE 
IN SCIENCE 
DEGREE 



LAW ENFORCEMENT 



53 



TOTAL — Required for the Associate in Science Degree: 52 semester Hours. 

Associate Degree Programs Successful completion of the first two 
years of one of the programs offered by the Department of Criminal 
Justice with a minimum quality point average of 2.0 qualifies the 
student for the Associate in Science in either law Enforcement Admin- 
istration, Forensic Science, or Correctional Administration. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



HOTEL 

AND RESTAURANT 

ADMINISTRATION 



Hotel and Restaurant Administration 
FIRST YEAR 



54 



E113 

BAlOl 

HM103 


Fall 

English Composition 
Business Law 

Principles of Hotel Manage- 
ment 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 E220 
3 BA 105 
HM104 
3 

"9 

SECOND YEAR 


BA113 


Math 

Sociology or Psychology or 

Political Science 
Business Finance 


3 

IE 105 
3 BA125 
3 

9 

THIRD YEAR 


AlllH ^ 
HM165 


Introductory Accounting 1 
'Science 
Tourism 


3 A112H 
3 BA 107 
3 

"9 

FOURTH YEAR 


EC 133 
HM302 
BA227 


Principles of Economics 1 

Purchasing 

Risk and Insurance 


3 HM150 
3 HM 342 
3 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

Report Writing 3 

Marketing 3 

Procedures and Techniques in 
Hotel Management 3 



Math 3 

'Technical Data Processing 3 
Management and Organization 3 



introductory Accounting II 3 

Advertising and Promotion 3 
'Science 3 



Management Decision Making 3 

Management Accounting 3 
Psychology or Sociology or 

History 3 



Literature or Philosophy or 

Pine Arts 
Hotel Management Elective 
Elective 



FIFTH YEAR 



BA230 



Investments 3 

Hotel Management Elective 3 
Elective or Foreign Language 3 



SIXTH YEAR 



EC 350 Economics of Labor Relations 
BA316 Sales Management 

Hotel Management Elective 



HM512 
HM411 



Seminar in Hotel Management 3 
Analysis of Design Systems 3 
Hotel Management Elective 3 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Electives 



SEVENTH YEAR 

9 



Electives 



' Students may Substitute HIV! 410. 
SC 115-116 Biology is recommended. 

Hotel Management Elective, from area of Hotel Administration, Restaurant Management, 
Institutional Management, Tourism and Travel. 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



Public 


Administration 


FIRST YEAR 






PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 


All! 
EC 133 
E113 


Fall 

Intro. Accounting 1 
Prin. of Econ. 1 
Englisti Composition 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 A 114 
3 EC 134 
3 E206 

SECOND YEAR 


Spring 

Municipal Accounting 
Prin. of Econ. II 
Composition & Literature 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 




BAlOl 
MS 112 


Business Lavi/ 
West. Civilization II 
Literature or Philosophy or 
Pine Arts 


3 BA 125 
3 MS 114 

3 IE 105 
THIRD YEAR 


Management & Organization 
Econ. Hist, of the Western 

World 
Tech. Data Processing 


3 

3 
3 




PS 121 


Amer. Govt. 
'Science 
Sociology or Psychology 


3 PA 320 

3 

3 

BA216 

FDURTH YEAR 


Municipal Finance and 

Budgeting 
•Science 
Statistics 


3 
3 
3 




PA 301 


Public Administration 

Mathematics 

Elective 


3 PA 302 

3 

3 

FIFTH YEAR 


Procedures in Public Admin 

Mathematics 

Elective 


. 3 
3 
3 




PS 216 


Urban Govt 

Electives 


. 3 EC 314 
. 6 

SIXTH YEAR 


Public Finance 
Electives 


3 
6 




PA 405 


Collective Bargaining in the 

Public Sector 

Electives 


PA 490 
. 3 
. 6 


Prin. & Practices of Public 

Health Administration 
Electives 


3 

6 


BUSINESS ADM 



55 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 



SEVENTH YEAR 



PA 390 



Administrative Law 
Elective 



PA 307 Urban & Reg. Problems 
PA 512 Seminar in Pub. Admin. 



TOTAL: 120 Semester Hours 
*SC 121-122 Biology with Lab. is recommended. 




International Business 



Fall 

E 113 English Composition 
HS 112 Western Civ. II 
BA 101 Business Law 



A 111 



BA312 



Business Math 
Psychology, Sociology or 

Political Science elective 
Introductory Accounting I 



EC 133 Principles of Economics I 
BA 216 Statistics 
Science 



PS 221 International Relations 

EC 342 International Economics 

Area Elective 



International Business 
Elective/Language 
Area Elective 



BA 415 Comparative Business Mgt. 
BA 350 International Finance 
Area Elective 



Literature, Philosophy or 

Fine Arts 
Elective/ Language 



FIRST YEAR 
Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 E206 

3 HS 114 

3 

BA 128 

SECOND YEAR 

3 BA 105 

IE 105 
3 A 112 

3 

THIRD YEAR 

3 EC 134 

3 BA 125 

3 

FOURTH YEAR 

3 PS 223 

3 

3 EC 440 

FIFTH YEAR 

3 BA313 

3 

3 

SIXTH YEAR 

3 BA 321 

3 

3 BA 431 



SEVENTH YEAR 



Spring 

English Comp. & Literature 
Economic History of the 

Western World 
Quantitative Tech. in 

Management 



Principles of Marketing 
Tech. Data Processing 
Introductory Accounting II 



Principles of Economics II 
Management & Organization 
Science 



International Law & 

Organization 
Economic Development 
Area Elective 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 



International Marketing Mgt. 3 
Elective/ Language 3 

Area Elective 3 



Operation of the Multi- 
national Firm , 3 

East-West Trade Problems 3 

Psychology, Sociology or 
Political Science elective 3 



Literature, Philosophy or 

Fine Arts 3 

Elective/ Language 3 



The Language requirement is optional. Should the student elect not to complete 18 hours of 
a language, his 12 hours of free electives plus his 6 hours of literature, philosophy and 
fine arts electives will be used to satisfy the language requ/ement. The language will be 
taught in a conversational style. 

Foreign students will receive credit for 15 hours of language but they will be required to take 
one course in English for Foreign Students dealing with professional terminology in their field. 
Foreign students who are not proficient in English will be required to take English for Foreign 
Students. A foreign student who has received a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
institution in his native country will receive at least 2-years' credit towards his baccalaureate 
from the University of New Haven. Transfer credit does not preclude the requirement for 
foreign students to enroll in English for Foreigh Students until they develop a required level 
of proficiency. 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS 



57 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



RETAILING 



Retailing 



Fall 

E 113 English Composition 
HS112 Western Civilization II 

1700 to Present 
BA 101 Business Law I 



FIRST YEAR 
Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 



E206 
HS114 



BA105 



Sem. 
Spring Hrs. 

Composition & Literature 3 

Economic History of the West- 
ern World 3 
Principles of Marketing 3 



EC 133 



Principles of Economics I 
Math 

Sociology, Psychology or 
Political Science 



SECOND YEAR 

3 EC 134 

3 

IE 105 
3 



Principles of Economics II 3 

Math 3 

Technical Data Processing 3 



58 



A 111 Introductory Accounting I 
BA107 Advertising & Promotion 
BA314 Marketing Research Methods 



THIRD YEAR 

3 A 112 

3 BA301 

3 BA 125 



Introductory Accounting II 3 
Retailing 3 

Management & Organization 3 



FOURTH YEAR 



Science 3 

RET 209 Retail Advertising & Sales 

Promotion 3 

RET 212 Textiles 3 



Science 3 
RET 215 Retail Credit Management 3 
RET 213 Furniture & Apparel Acces- 
sories 3 



BA231 



Industrial Relations 
Electives 



Sociology, Psychology or 

Political Science 
Electives 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



SIXTH YEAR 

RET 303 Fashions in Retailing 3 RET 310 Retail Merchandise Manage- 
Literature, Philosophy or Fine ment 

Arts 3 BA512 Seminar 

BA510 Managerial Economics 3 Internship 

9 

SEVENTH YEAR 

Electives 3 Electives 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

THOMAS C WARNER, JR., DEAN 



Bachelor of Science Degree 

MAJORS IN: 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 
MATERIALS ENGINEERING 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

MANAGEMENT OPTION 

COMPUTER OPTION 



Associate in Science Degree 

MAJORS IN: 

ENGINEERING 
ENGINEERING SCIENCE 
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE 



ENGINEERING 



ASSOCIATE 
IN SCIENCE 
PROGRAMS 



The purpose of this series of Engineering programs is to meet the needs 
of students who wish to specialize in one of the fields of engineering 
offered by the University without undertaking a bachelor program. The 
first two years a student will take the necessary courses in Physics 
and Mathematics which are prerequisites for most engineering courses. 
The third and fourth years allow selection from the following engineer- 
ing fields: General, Civil, Electrical, Industrial, Materials, or Mechanical 
Engineering or Computer Science and Occupational Safety and Hygiene. 



COMMON 
CORE COURSES 



60 







FIRST YEAR 






E113 
ME 101 
M115 


Fall 

English Composition 
Engineering Graphics 
Math. Analysis 1 


Sent. 
Hrs. 

3 M117 
3 BA 125 
3 IE 102 

SECOND YEAR 


Spring 
Calculus 1 

Management & Organiz, 
Intro, to Computers 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 


MT200 
PH103or 
PH108 


Engineering Materials 
Physics 1 


3 M118 

PH104or 
3 PH 209 


Calculus II 
Physics II 


4 
3 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

After completion of the above Core requirements, the student will obtain approval from the 
Department Chairman in his area of interest or the Dean of the School of Engineering for 
the remainder of his program. 

A minimum of 60 semester hours is required for the Associate in Science Degree in Engi- 
neering. 



OCCUPATIONAL 

SAFETY AND 

HYGIENE 



Occupational Safety and Hygiene 

FIRST YEAR 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



E113 
ME 101 
M115 


Fall 

English Composition 
Engineering Graphics 
Math Analysis 1 


Sem. 
Mrs. 

3 
3 
3 


M 117 
BA125 
IE 102 


Spring 

Calculus 1 

Management & Organ. 
Intro, to Computers 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 






SECOND YEAR 






MT123 
PH103 


Engineering Materials 
General Physics 1 


3 
3 


M118 
PH 104 


Calculus II 
General Physics II 


4 
3 


or 
PH108 


Physics 1 
Elective, Restricted 


3 
3 


or 
PH209 


Physics II 
Elective, Restricted 


3 

3 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



Pill Psychology 3 CH 103 

IE 106 Safety Organ. & Mgmt. 3 IE 216 

IE 201 Accident Conditions & IE 217 

Controls 3 

Elective, Restricted 3 
A minimum of 61 semester hours is required for the Associate in Science Degree in Occupa- 
tional Safety and Hygiene. 



Intro. Gen. Chemistry 
Elements of Ind. Hygiene 
Ind. Safety Aux. Functions 
Elective, Restricted 



OCCUPATIONAL 
SAFETY AND 
HYGIENE 



SELECTION OF ELECTIVES 

Restricted electives are to be chosen in consultation with department members and must be 
approved by the chairman of the Department of Industrial Engineering. 

The engineering programs combine the basic courses in chemistry, 
mathematics, physics, humanities, and social sciences, with advanced 
studies in the various branches of engineering. All students are required 
to take the same core courses which comprise the first three years of 
the engineering program. An associate degree in engineering science 
may be received upon completion of the first four years of the Bache- 
lor's degree. 



E113 
MS 121 
M115' 



FIRST YEAR 



Fall 

English Composition 
History of Science 
Mathematical Analysis I 



Sem. 
Mrs. 

3 
3 
3 



IE 102 
M117 
E201 



Spring 

Intro, to Computers 

Calculus I 

World Literature I 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 

3 



BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE 
DEGREE 

COMMON 
CORE COURSES 



61 



ES107 
M118 



SECOND YEAR 



Introduction to Engineering 
Calculus II 



E202 

PH108 

M203 



World Literature II 

Physics I 

Calculus III 



PH209 Physics II 

CH 103' Intro, to Gen. Chem. vn/Lab 



CH 105 General Chem. w/Lab 
CE201 Statics 



THIRD YEAR 

3 

3 



PH 210 Physics III 3 

CE 202 Mechanics of Mat. I 3 

CH 110 Environmental Chemistry 3 



Notes: 1. Students with sufficient preparation v^ill be placed In course M 117. 

2. Students will be placed in the appropriate course based on their preparation in 
Chemistry. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the three-year core program, the stu- 
dent may pursue advanced courses with specialization in one of the 
many areas of Civil Engineering which are in great demand today to 
solve the problems of our congested cities and highways and the prob- 
lems of pollution of all types. 



CIVIL 
ENGINEERING 



ENGINEERING 



CIVIL 
ENGINEERING 



Civil Engineering 



62 







FOURTH YEAR 






IE 204 
M204 


Fall 

Engineering Economics 
Differential Equations 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 ME 101 

4 ME 204 

FIFTH YEAR 


Spring 

Engineering Graphics 
Dynamics 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 


CE302 
CE304 
ME 301 


Building Construction 

Soil Mechanics 

Thermodynamics 1 


3 CE301 

. 3 CE307 

.. 3 or 

CE313 

CE306 

SIXTH YEAR 


Transportation Engr 

Mech. of Materials II 

Structural Analysis 1 
Hydraulics 


3 
3 

3 
3 


CE303 
CE203 


Steel Design & Constr. 
Elective, General Studies 
Surveying 1 


3 CE314 
3 CE407 
3 


Concrete Design & Constr 
Contracts & Specifications 
Elective, General Studies 


. 3 
3 
3 




SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 






CE402 
EE223 


Electives, Math 
Electives, Restricted 
Water Supply and Power 
Prin. of Elec. Eng. 1 


3 CE501 
6 CE 404 
3 

3 EE336 
EC133 


Design Project 
Sanitary Engineering 
Electives, Restricted 
Inst. Electr. 
Prin. of Economics 1 


3 
3 
3 
3 

3 



Each student mW meet with the Chairman of the Civil Engineering Department during the 
Spring Semester of his second year in order to select the restricted electives which will, to- 
gether with the required courses, result in a program of maximum benefits to the student. 
TOTAL — Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering: 132-133 Semester Hours minimum. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the four-year core program, the student 
may pursue advanced courses with specialization in electronics, com- 
puters, servomechanisms, or industrial controls leading to the Bachelor 
of Science degree in Electrical Engineering. 

In order to acquire the Bachelor of Science degree, the student must 
complete the required courses listed below and a selected group of 
electives in the field of his choice. 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING 


Electrical Engineering 
Fall 

EE223 Prm. of Elec. Eng. 1 
M 204 Differential Equations 


FOURTH YEAR 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 EE 224 

4 EE 253 
ME 204 


Spring 

Prin. of E. E. II 
Elec. Eng. Lab 1 
Dynamics 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
2 
3 








FIFTH YEAR 








EE331 
EE341 

EE347 


Network Analysis 1 
Analog and Digital 

Computer Applications 
Electronic Devices 1 


3 EE 332 
EE348 
3 
3 


Network Analysis II 
Electronic Devices II 
Elective, Math. 


3 
3 
3 



EE351 
EE343 



SIXTH YEAR 



Elec. Systems Analysis 
Elec. Machines I 
Elective, Gen. Studies 



EE349 
EE355 



Elec. Engineering Lab. I 2 

Switching & Logical Design I 3 
Electives, Restricted 3 



ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING 



EE361 



EC 133 
EE453 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



Electromagnetic Theory 
Electives, Restricted 
Principles of Economics 
Elec. Engr. Lab. II 



IE 204 



Electives, Restricted 
Elective, Free 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Eng. Economics 



Restricted electives are to be chosen in consultation with department members and must be 

approved by the Chairman of the Department of Electrical Engineering. 

TOTAL— Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering: 132-133 semester hours minimum. 



ELECTIVES 



The program in Industrial Engineering is designed to prepare students 
to apply engineering methods in the solution of problems in industry. 
After successful completion of the four-year core program, the student 
will complete the following required courses and electives as listed. 



Industrial Engineering 



IE 204 

M204 



Fall 



Eng. Econ. 
Differential Equations 

Linear Algebra 



FOURTH YEAR 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

4 



ME 101 
ME 204 



Spring 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

Eng. Graphics 3 

Dynamics 3 



63 



INDUSTRIAL 
ENGINEERING 



FIFTH YEAR 



IE214 
IE 243 
IE 346 



IE 224 



EC 350 



EE223 



Management Theory 
Work Analysis 
Statistical Analysis 



Cost Control 

Electives, Restricted 
Programming 



EC 133 
IE 234 
IE 502 



SIXTH YEAR 



IE 504 



Prin. of Economics I 
Production Control 
Operations Research 



Laboratory, Thesis 
Electives, Restricted 
IE 443 Facilities Planning 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



Economics of Labor Rela- 
tions 
Math, Elective 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Elective, Restricted 
Prin. of Elec. Eng. 1 



EE336 



Elective, Free 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Elective, Restricted 
Instr. Elect. 




INDUSTRIAL Restricted electives are to be chosen in consultation with department members and must be 

CMr'iMrcDiMO approved by the Chairman of the Department of Industrial Engineering. Students may secure 

ENGINEERING restricted elective guide sheets from the Evening Division Office or from the department chair- 

man. 
TOTAL— Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Engineering: 131-133 semester hours. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the four-year core program, a student 
may pursue advanced courses with specialization in Materials Engineer- 
ing. Materials engineers are respected experts whose decisions on 
quality, safety factors, and materials selection are of vital concern to 
industry, government, and community. 



64 



MATERIALS 
ENGINEERING 



Materials Engineering 



IE 204 
M204 



Fall 



Eng. Economics 
Differential Equations 



FOURTH YEAR 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

4 



ME 101 
ME 204 



Spring 



Eng. Graphics 
Dynamics 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 



FIFTH YEAR 

MT219 Principles of Solids I 3 MT220 

ME 301 Thermodynamics I 3 MT 304 

CH 105 General Chemistry I w/Lab 4 



Principles of Solids II 3 
Mechanical Behavior of 

Materials 3 

Elective, Chemistry 3 or 4 



MT331 
MT342 



Non-ferrous Metallurgy 
Steels & Their Heat 

Treatment 
Elective, General Studies 



SIXTH YEAR 



Elective, Materials 
Elective, Restricted 



EE223 
EC 133 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



Elective, Materials 
Elective, General Studies 
Electives, Restricted 
Prin. of Elect. Engr. I 
Prin. of Economics I 



MT500 Research Project 3 

Elective, Free 3 

Electives, Restricted 6 

EE336 Instrumentation Electronics 3 



ELECTIVES 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Selection of Electives 

General Studies electives shall be chosen from the areas of English, Humanities, Philosophy, 
and Social Studies. Each student will meet with the chairman of the Materials Engineering 
Department during his third year to select restricted electives which will result in a program 
of maximum benefit to the student. 
TOTAL— Bachelor of Science Degree in Materials Engineering: 130-131 semester hours. 



Upon satisfactory completion of the four-year core program, the stu- 
dent may pursue advanced courses with specialization in machine 
design, aerospace, thermal science mechanics, etc., leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. The student must complete the required 
courses listed below and a selected group of electives in the field of 
his choice. 



MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING 



Mechanical Engineering 







FOURTH 


YEAR 






IE 204 
M204 


Fall 

Eng. Economics 
Differential Equations 
Elective, Free 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
4 

3 

FIFTH 


ME 101 
ME 204 
EC 133 

YEAR 


Spring 

Eng. Graphics 

Dynamics 

Prin. of Econ. 1 


Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 

3 

3 


ME 301 
ME 303 
CE307 


Thermodynamics 1 

Prin. of Engrg. Analysis 

Mech. of Materials II 


3 
3 
3 

SIXTH 


ME 302 
ME311 
ME 315 

YEAR 


Thermodynamics II 
Machine Elements 
M.E. Lab. 1 


3 
3 
2 


MT219 
ME 404 


"Principles of Solids 1 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Heat & Mass Transfer 


3 
3 
3 


ME 321 


Fluid Mechanics 
Elective, Gen. Studies 
Elective, Restricted 


3 
3 
3 




SEVENTH AND 


EIGHTH YEARS 






EE223 


Prin. of Elec. Eng. 1 
Electives, Restricted 


3 
12 


ME 415 
EE336 


M.E. Lab. II 

Instr. Electronics 
Electives, Restricted 


2 

3 
3 



*MT200 may be taken in place of MT219. 

Restricted electives are limited to scientific or technical fields and must be approved by the 
Department Chairman. Students are welcome to consult the chairman early in their studies for 
the purpose of planning a suitable program. More detailed information about requirements 
and electives is available from the Mechanical Engineering Department. 
TOTAL— Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering: 130-131 semester hours. 



65 



ELECTIVES 



The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Industrial Technol- 
ogy is designed to produce a practitioner who is highly prepared to 
apply established scientific and engineering knowledge and methods in 
the support of industrial engineering activities. Moreover, the industrial 
technology program will produce a professional who will be expected 
to contribute to the solution of many problems of modern society such 
as crime abatement, conservation of natural resources, overcrowding 
in urban areas, transportation, pollution, and public health; all are 
areas of difficulty that are susceptible to the well-trained technologist. 



INDUSTRIAL 
TECHNOLOGY 



ENGINEERING 



INDUSTRIAL 
TECHNOLOGY 



MANAGEMENT 
OPTION 



Management Option 



E113 
M115 
IE 102 
PH 103- 

105 
ME 101 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 



Sem. 
Fall Hrs. 

Eng. Comp. 3 

Math. Analysis I 3 

Intro, to Computers 3 

Physics I 4 



Engineering Graphics 



3 



E201 
PH 104- 

106 
M 117 
EC133 
ME 102 



Spring 

World Literature I 

Physics II 

Calculus I 

Economics I 

Drawing and Design 



Sett). 
Hrs. 

3 

4 
3 
3 
3 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



66 



CH103 

M118 

CE201 

E202 

EE223 

IE 204 



IE 226 
IE 214 
IE 224 
IE 346 



Intro, to Gen. Chemistry/ Lab 3 CHIOS 

Calculus II 4 CE202 

Statics 3 ME 204 

World Literature II 3 A 111 

Elec. Engr. I 3 IE 223 

Engr. Economics 3 

19 
FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



Chemistry/Lab 4 

Mechanics of Mat. I 3 

Dynamics 3 

Accounting 3 

Personnel Administration . 3 

16 



Numerical Analysis I 
Management Theory 

Programming 

Statistical Analysis 
General Studies Elective 



3 EE336 Instrumentation 3 

3 IE 234 Production Control 3 

3 IE 347 Probability Analysis 3 

3 EC 350 Economics of Labor Relations 3 

3 IE 233 Cost Control 3 

— General Studies Elective 3 



SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



IE 227 Numerical Analysis II 3 

IE 243 Work Analysis I 3 

IE443 Facilities Planning 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Elective 3 

15 



IE 245 Work Analysis II 3 

IE 502 Operations Research 3 

IE 504 Lab Thesis 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



COMPUTER 
OPTION 



Computer Option 



E113 
M115 
IE 106 
PH 103- 

105 
EC133 



FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 



Fall 

Eng. Comp. 
Math. Analysis I 
Intro, to Computers 

Physics I 

Print, of Economics I 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

3 
3 
3 

4 
3 



E201 
M 117 
IE 107 
IE 204 
PH 104- 
106 



Spring 

World Literature I 
Calculus I 

Intro, to Computers II 
Engineering Economics 

Physics II 



Sem. 
Mrs. 

3 

3 

3 

3 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 



CM 103 


Intro, to Chemistry/Lab 


3 


CHIOS 


M118 


Calculus II 


4 


IE 226 


IE 228 


Intro, to Fortran 


3 


EE336 


E202 


World Literature II 


3 


IE 229 


EE223 


Elec. Engr. 1 


3 


IE 230 



IE 227 
IE 347 
Alll 
IE 346 
IE 331 
EE355 



16 
FIFTH AND SIXTH YEARS 



Chemistry/ Lab 4 

Numerical Analysis I 3 

Instrumentation 3 

Advanced Fortran 3 

Intro, to Cobol 3 

16 



Numerical Analysis II 
Probability Analysis 
Accounting I 
Statistical Analysis 
Advanced Cobol 
Switching Design 



3 


IE 233 


Cost Control 


3 


IE 234 


Production Control 


3 


IE 502 


Operations Research 


3 


IE 332 


PL/1 and RPG 


3 
3 


EE356 


Logic Design 



18 
SEVENTH AND EIGHTH YEARS 



IE 334 


Assembler Language 


3 


IE 336 


IE 223 


Personnel Administration 


3 


EC 350 


IE 335 


Simulations — Appl. 


3 


IE 504 


IE 214 


Management Theory 


3 






General Studies Elective 


3 






Restricted Elective 


3 





Hardware Operation 
Economics of Labor Relations 
Laboratory Thesis 
General Studies Elective 
Restricted Elective 



COMPUTER 
OPTION 



67 



SELECTION OF ELECTIVES 

All electives are to be chosen in consultation with department members and must be approved 

by the chairman of the Industrial Engineering Department. 

Students may secure restrictive elective guide sheets from the department secretary. 

TOTAL — Bachelor of Industrial Technology: 130 semester hours, minimum. 

BACHELOR DEGREE PROGRAMS IN ENGINEERING 

(Groton, Connecticut) 

These are Junior and Senior year evening programs given at Groton, 
Connecticut, leading to the Bachelor of Science degrees in Mechanical 
and Industrial Engineering. They are open to all qualified students 
possessing the equivalent of a two year Associate in Science degree 
in Engineering. The Admissions policy for these courses is the same 
as stated for the Engineering program at the West Haven Campus. The 
course outlines for these programs are also the same. 

Tuition: $120 per 3 semester hour course, which includes registration 
fees. Textbooks are available at the opening of the class at the Univer- 
sity Book Store. 



ELECTIVES 



EXTENSION 

CREDIT 

DEGREE 

PROGRAMS 



ENGINEERING 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



69 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS— UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOLS 



ACCOUNTING Jeffrey L. Williams, Chairman 



Alii Introductory Accounting. 
' ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite to all other courses in accounting. 
A fundamental approach to the concepts, principles and procedures 
embodied In the financial accounting system. Emphasis is placed upon 
both the preparation of financial statements of merchandising business 
concerns via a procedural understanding of the financial accounting 
cycle and the interpretation of such statements. 

Alio Introductory Accounting II. 
' ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A-111. 

A continuation of the fundamental approach and material covered in 
A 111 coupled with both the financial and managerial accounting func- 
tions for manufacturing business concerns. 

A'l \ A Municipal Accounting. 
' ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 111. 

An introduction to accounting principles, standards, and procedures 
applicable to state and local governments. The emphasis is on muni- 
cipal government. 

A00 1 Intermediate Accounting I. 
^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 112. 

A rigorous extension of the concepts, principles and procedures of 
corporate financial accounting, fundamentally introduced in A 111 and 
A 112. Given an emphasis upon reporting financial position and results 
of operations, the principles governing and the procedures implement- 
ing accounting valuations for current assets, investments and funds, 
fixed assets-tangible, fixed assets-intangible, other assets and deferred 
charges are developed and examined. Throughout, reference is made to 
the relevant publications of professional accounting societies and 
accounting associations. 



Aooo Intermediate Accounting II. 
^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 221. 

Continuing the emphasis upon corporate financial reporting established 
in A 221, the principles and procedures associated with accounting 
valuations for current liabilities, long term liabilities, deferred credits 
and stockholders equity are developed and examined. Additional topics 
include income tax allocation, price level changes, accounting changes, 
statement of changes in financial position, pensions and leases, install- 
ment sales and consignments. Throughout, reference is made to the 
relevant publications of professional accounting societies and account- 
ing associations. 

Ao-OO Cost Accounting I. 
^^*3 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 112. 

An indepth examination of the financial accounting principles and 
procedures underlying the determination and reporting of product costs 
for manufacturing concerns. Emphasis is placed upon the concepts and 
classifications of product costs (direct material, direct labor and 
manufacturing overhead) as well as the recording and accumulating of 
such costs within job order and process accounting systems. 

Aoo^ Cost Accounting II. 
^^^' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 223. 

Continuing the underlying emphasis on product cost determination 
established in A 223, the tools and techniques of profit planning and 
cost analysis are Introduced and integrated. Topics include budgets, 
standard costs, direct costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, differential 
and comparative cost analysis, by-product costs, transfer pricing, 
pricing methods and capital budgeting. 

A00 1 Advanced Accounting I. 
*3*3 ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 222. 

A concentrated examination of financial accounting concepts, principles 
and procedures applicable to partnership and consolidation accounting. 
Partnership topics include; formation and division of income, changes 
in ownership and liquidation. Consolidation topics Include comprehen- 
sive coverage of the cost and equity methods as well as other issues 
(purchase versus pooling of interests, entity theory, etc.) related to 
consolidation accounting. Other financial accounting topics of a special- 
ized nature not previously covered can be included at the discretion 
of the instructor. 



70 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



/\ OOp Advanced Accounting II. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; A 222. 

An intensive approach to financial accounting theory by means of 
particular emphasis upon financial accounting principles as pronounced 
by the authoritative boards of professional accounting societies and as 
found in the literature generated by professional accounting associa- 
tions. Extensive use is made of the publications of professional account- 
ing societies and accounting associations. 



AO^I Financial Decision Making. 
•>^'* ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA113 and A 339. 

The principles and procedures associated with optimal decision making 
within the functional areas of finance. Emphasis is placed upon an 
understanding of the applications and limitations of decision models 
for the investment, financing, and dividend decisions of the profit 
oriented business unit. 



AOOO Auditing I. 
*^*^*^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 222. 

Evaluation of the effectiveness of the various accounting systems and 
procedures as they relate to internal control. Auditing procedures to 
test reliability are developed, followed by teachings of prerequisites 
that are to be met for auditing standards applicable to "field work." 
A practice case links the course to practice. 

AO*3^ Auditing II. 
*-'*^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite A 333. 

Introduction to the profession of auditors (internal and independent). 
Intricacies and variety of audit report presentations. Full coverage of 
auditing standards and latest developments in the field of auditing. 
Principle of internal control questionnaire and audit program designs. 

A 'aOK Income Tax Procedures I. 
'^ •-?*-?^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 112. 

The law and the procedures for Individual income tax returns. Includes 
the determination of gross income, ordinary gains and losses, capital 
gains and losses, dividends, deductions of all kinds, and withholding. 

AOO£I Income Tax Procedures II. 
*^*^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 335. 

Continuation of the law and procedures to cover installment sales, 
inventories, accounting, etc., and handling taxes of partnerships, 
estates and trusts, and corporations, including reorganizations, per- 
sonal holding companies, etc. Processes of filing returns, paying taxes, 
and getting refunds. Coverage of Social Security, Federal Estate and 
Gift taxes. 



ART Elizabeth J. Moffitt, Chairman 



A DT" 1 01 1 /^O Introduction to Studio Art. 
/Ar\ I H^ I - I \J^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 
This course provides a foundation to further study in the visual arts 
and is designed to heighten the sensitivity and awareness of the 
individual. There will be an exploration of the expressive potential of 
a variety of materials. Problems in drawing, painting, and design. 
Contemporary art forms will be viewed in their historical relationship 
to those of the past. 



ART 1 22 



Layout and Printing Techniques. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Techniques of layout, lettering, and design in relation to printing 
methods. 



A D-T" opjl Drawing and Painting I. 
'^rv I ^\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Problems in drawing will include exercises in coordination of hand and 
eye, manipulation of line for articulation of space and form, perspec- 
tive, figure drawing and experience with various drawing materials. In 
painting, problems in pictorial composition will involve the manipulation 
of form and color using a variety of pigments and materials. 



ART 203 



Commercial Art. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Problems of graphic arts and advertising. Relations between the arts 
and methods of communication. An introduction to the fields of adver- 
tising, illustration, and editorial art; the role of the advertising agency; 
and the analysis of ideas for visual statement. 



A OOQ Managerial Accounting. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 224. 

The underlying principles, procedures and techniques of accounting 

analysis applicable to the managerial functions of planning, controlling 

and evaluating the economic performance of the profit oriented business 

unit. 



ART 204 



Commercial Art II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 203. 

The organization and presentation of a project which demonstrates the 
student's ability to apply theory on a professional level. Work for 
presentation in the form of a portfolio is developed through individual 
instruction and criticism. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



71 



A DT O/^Ci Ceramics. 
'^rv ' ^-yJiJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Investigation of the qualities inherent in clay as a medium of expres- 
sive design; structural qualities of clay as related to plastic form and 
volume. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

A DT Oil O 1 O Design I and II. 
'^rv ' ^ • I "^ ' ^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Exploration of basic visual elements; line, color, texture, shape, size, 
volume, space, and the psychic response they elicit. Organization of 
visual elements in effective design. Interaction of color. 



ART 31 3-31 4 



ART 231 



History of Art to the Renaissance. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

World art as an expressive and social phenomenon from its earliest 
beginnings, through religious and cultural cycles, to the visual develop- 
ments of the Renaissance. 



ART 232 



History of Modern Art. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Art from the Renaissance to the Twentieth Century in Europe and 
America; a continuation of Art 231. 



Photography I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

A course designed to explore the technical aspects of photography as 
a means for the development of the student's sensitivity to the image 
as an art form. Laboratory course. Technical demonstrations and ex- 
perimental laboratory techniques. Emphasis on black and white. Group 
criticisms. Field trips. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

A DT" *^ 1 R Printmaking. 

'^rv ' »-> I *^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The expressive potential of the graphic image through the techniques 
of silkscreen, wood cut, wood engraving, linoleum blockprint, collotype, 
nonotype, and photo-silkscreening. Problems in black and white and 
color. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



A D-T- 1 ^ Introduction to Sculpture II. 
'^r* ■ *-? I \J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A continuation of Art 311, Introduction to Sculpture I, with further 
exploration of three-dimensional materials and the possibilities they 
present for creative visual statements. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



A DT 'QO 1 Drawing and Painting II. 
'^'^ ' OV^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Further study in two dimensional formulations by means of exploitation 
of form and color for expressive content. Experimentation with various 
drawing techniques for maximum effectiveness. Figure drawing. 



A DT *!^*^1 Contemporary Art. 
'^rv ' OO I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Art as an expressive and social phenomenon from 1945 through the 
developmental happenings of the present. 



ADT*^OP Figure Drawing. 

'^'^ ' ^^'-'^- Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 201. 

Further study of graphic articulations using a variety of materials: 
pen, ink, charcoal, pencil, mixed media. Ejcperimentation with tech- 
niques and refinement of means. Study of forms in nature. Life drawing. 



ART 401 



Studio Seminar I. 

Credit, 1-4 semester hours. 

Art 101-102, Art 201, Art 302 or Art 313, and Art 



Prerequisites 

electives. 

Drawing on his development through his previous study the student 

will concentrate on major projects in areas of his choice. 



A DT *a 1 1 Introduction to Sculpture I. 
'^rv ' *^ ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The exploration of three dimensional materials for maximum effective- 
ness in expressive design. Experimentation with clay, plaster, wood, 
stone, canvas, wire screening, metal, found objects, etc. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

ART '^1 P Lettering. 

'^'^ ' <J I £. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 211. 

Design and execution of basic hand lettering with pen and brush; 
utilization of hand lettering and type in the design of printed matter; 
use of letter forms as an element of visual design. 



A DT /LC\*^ Studio Seminar II. 
'^rv ' *+W^ Credit, 1-4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 401. 
Continuation of Studio Seminar I. 



____ p-/^/^ Independent Study. 

ART 599 Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area if interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 



72 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Ward Theilman, Chairman 



DA 1 OCi Management and Organization. 
■-"^ ' ^-^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The business organization, stressing the conceptual foundations of 
business. Ethical and behavioral issues in organizing. The authority, 
responsibility, and accountability in organization and managment which 
underlie businesses of every legal form. 



BA lOl 



Business Law I. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Contract law as a foundation for anticipating legal difficulties and 
making the best use of legal advice. Functional and policy problems 
in the legal resolution of a controversy. The origin and development 
of common, statutory, and constitutional law and of the functioning 
of the judicial system 



BA 128 



BA 102 



Business Law II. 

Credit, '3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 101. 

Agency, partnerships, corporations, and legal aspects of marketing. 



DA 1 /^K Principles of Marketing. 
•-"^ ' v-'O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The fundamental functions of marketing involving the basic principles 
of the flow of goods and services from producer to consumer. Mar- 
ketmg methods, policies, and problems of the manufacturer, whole- 
saler, and retailer are reviewed through analysis of channels of dis- 
tribution, price policies, competition, and market information. 

DA 1 (^"7 Advertising and Promotion. 
*^r-\ I V.^ / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105 or equivalent. 

The design, management, and evaluation of the various communica- 
tions programs involved in marketing and public relations. 



DA 1 1 O Business Finance. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 111 or Instructor's consent. 

Brief study of the unincorporated business enterprise. The modern 
corporation. Basic security types of stocks and bonds, capital struc- 
ture, promotion, investment, banking, government regulation, admin- 
istration, sources and uses of working capital, expansion, combina- 
tions, mergers, refinancing and recapitalization, and failure and 
reorganization. 



BA 118 



Business Mathematics I. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course emphasizes basic mathematical techniques as they apply 
to business: logarithmic functions, progressions, exponential growth, 
and the mathematics of finance; breakeven and inventory models; and 
matrix algebra. 



Quantitative Techniques in Managament. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 118. 

With emphasis on more rigorous applications of quantitative techniques 
in Business, this course stresses probability theory and probabilistic 
decision models, systems of linear related analysis. 



DA O/^O Physical Distribution Management. 
^-^f^ ^^-'0 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105. 

Planning organization, management, and operation of logistic systems, 
with emphasis on the effective use of transportation to meet the 
objectives of a business. 



BA216 



statistics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 128 or equivalent. 

A course in elementary statistical concepts such as frequency dis- 
tributions, measure of central tendency, measures of variability, the 
normal curve, point and interval estimation, sampling distributions, 
and simple decision theory. 



DA 00 1 Law of Sales. 

'-'^^ ^^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 102, 

This course is an advanced study of Business Law comprising: bail- 
ments; duties and liabilities of bailees, common carriers, and ware- 
housemen; the laws governing the rights of parties engaged in the 
transfer of personal property. Questions of title, risks assumed, 
rights of creditors, express and implied warranties, tjuyers and sellers 
remedies, together with the business background out of which such 
relations arise, are all considered. 



DA OOO Law of Commercial Paper and Bankruptcy. 
^^1^ ^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA221. 

This course is a study of the Negotiable Instruments Law, dealing with 
negotiable promissory notes, bills of exchange, and bank credits with 
an analysis of their form and function in commercial transactions. A 
brief survey of bankruptcy procedure under the federal bankruptcy 
laws is included. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



73 



BA227 



Risk and Insurance. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 125. 

The importance of risi* in business affairs; risk situations analyzed; 
ttie different methods of meeting risk considered; extended considera- 
tion given to the various forms of insurance coverage. 



BA302 



BA228 



Procurement Management. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; BA 105. 

A course designed to include the examination of the functions of 
materials supervision and management as well as a study of the pur- 
chasing process 



DA OOQ Financial Management. 
^f^ ^£->P Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 113. 

Analytical techniques for dealing with financial problems and their 
application to corporate financial management. Capital budgeting, 
cost of funds, capital structure, valuation, and some aspects of in- 
vestment problems. 



BA230 



Investments. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 113 or EC 134 or Instructor's consent. 
Investment media and institutions in the capital markets, the determina- 
tion of investment values, and the analytical tools of investment 
appraisal and portfolio management. 



BA231 



Industrial Relations. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (SO 411) 

Prerequisite: BA 125. 

Human factors in the management function including union-manage- 
ment relations, history of human relations, individual and group pro- 
ductivity, the company, and the community. 



DA O C^O Quantitative Analysis. 
'-"^ ^-"^^^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 128. 

Basic analytical geometry and functions, and differential and integral 

calculus used to solve business problems. 



RA '^Dl Retailing. 

'-'^^ ^^v-' I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105. 

Modern merchandising methods used by retail stores, including store 
organization, buying, pricing, receiving, marketing, publicity, selling, 
record keeping, and stock control. 



Industrial Marketing. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105. 

Practices and policies in the distribution of industrial goods, including 
purchasing practices, market analysis, channels of distribution, dis- 
tribution and pricing policies, competitive practices, and operating 
costs. 



BA312 



International Business. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105. 

Principles of International t/arketing; the theory of trade and com- 
mercial policy; foreign exchange rates, exchange control, and foreign 
investments; world trade in commodities; methods of exporting and 
importing; and an evaluation of comparative distribution systems. 



D A O 1 C^ Marketing Management. 
■-^^^ *-' ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA105. 

Policies, practices, and problems in the field of marketing manage- 
ment; product development, product planning for promotion; market 
investigation, quantitative and qualitative; pricing and price policies; 
planning the marketing effort; and control of marketing operations. 



BA316 



Sales Management. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105. 

Problems and resulting policies encountered in the management of a 
sales organization. Qualifications and duties of the sales manager, 
departmental organization; recruiting, selecting, training, stimulating, 
supervising, compensating, and routing salesmen; and territories, 
quotas, expenses, promotions, and policies. 



DA '^17 %T^i\\ Business Management. 
^^^ O I / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior Standing. 

This course is designed to enable the student, who is considering a 
career of self-employment, to examine realistically some of the 
characteristics, opportunities, risk-taking and decision making in new 
business, new enterprises or self-employment ventures. 



BA333 



Advanced Statistics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA216. 

A course stressing advanced statistical concepts and statistical 
methods relating to business. Topics include tests of hypotheses, 
analysis of variance, sample designs, correlation and linear regression, 
index numbers, and time series analysis. 



74 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



DA *3^0 Marketing Research. 
^f^ 0*+^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: BA 105 and BA 216. 

Research as a component of the marketing information system. Defini- 
tion of objectives, selection of appropriate research designs and survey 
techniques, samphng methods, analysis and interpretation of primary 
and secondary data, and management of the marketing research func- 
tion, including value analysis and budget considerations. 

DA AAOl Independent Study. 
^1^ *-r*-r^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Independent study to be performed in a project of interest to the 
student and under direction of a faculty member to be designated by 
the department chairman. Project, student, and faculty director must 
be approved by both the department chairman and the Dean of the 
Business School. 

DA /\.^Ok Internship. 

^3/A *+CJS' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Senior Standing and permission of the Department 

Chairman. 

This program provides monitored field experience mVn business and 

industry subject to academic guidance and review. 

DA C^IO Managerial Economics. 
^^^ *J I V-» Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and EC 134 and BA 113. 
Integrates principles and concepts from the several business and 
economic fields to exemplify decision processes and strategies 
applicable to the management of the individual firm. 



BA512 



Seminar. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

A rigorous examination of competing concepts of the role of business 
in society. A capstone, integrative course relating the firm to its 
environment. Issues arising from aggregate social, political, legal, and 
economic factors are stressed. 



CHEMISTRY William H. Nyce, Chairman 



^H 1 O^ Elementary Organic Chemistry. 
^-^■' • yj*-* Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of the department. 
A one-semester introduction to one of the major fields of chemistry 
designed for students not majoring In chemistry. Nomenclature, struc- 
ture, and the principal reactions of aliphatic and aromatic organic 
chemistry will be studied. 



Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or one high school unit of chemistry, or written 
qualifying examination. 

Application of nuclear reactions, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, 
the production and properties of metals, the properties of the halogen 
and sulfur groups, and organic chemistry. Laboratory work related to 
the material covered. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00, 

C^VA 1 Ofi General Chemistry II w/ Lab. 
^^*^ ' '-'>-' Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 105. 

Chemical equilibria, chemical bonding, solutions, the chemistry of 
nitrogen, carbon, silicon, and boron; the use of spectroscopy to deter- 
mine structure of compounds. Laboratory work includes experiments 
in qualitative analysis. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

^\-A \ C\fk Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 
^^n ' ^<J^J Credit, 1 semester hour. 

Prerequisite: CH 103. 

A laboratory course designed to accompany CH 104. The principal 

operations of organic synthesis such as refluxing, distillation, filtration, 

and crystallization are studied and applied in a number of simple 

preparations. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

r^H 1 1 O Environmental Chemistry. 
^,^n I I \J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 105 or consent of instructor. 
Chemical method of solving pollution problems in three major areas: 
the air environment, the water environment, and in the treatment of 
solid wastes. In each area process flow sheets, chemical reactions, 
and process equipment necessary for the reduction of pollutants will 
be studied. Recommendations in these areas will also be reviewed. 



^I-I 1 r^*^ introduction to General Chemistry w/Lab. 
^-^r^ ' yj'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introductory course in inorganic chemistry dealing with elements, 
compounds, reactions, atomic structure, chemical bonding solutions, 
and nuclear reactions. Laboratory work involves weighing and experi- 
ments related to the material covered in lectures. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



r^H 11^ History of Chemistry. 
^^n I I »i^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of instructor. 
The history of chemistry beginning with ancient civilizations through the 
middle ages and the alchemist's search for gold. The discovery of the 
various elements and the periodic table. The lives of chemistry's great 
men and women, chemistry's contribution to the atomic age. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



75 



^LJ 1 Op) Chemistry of Addicting and Hallucinogenic Drugs. 
^^'' ' ^^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 103 or permission of instructor. 
Tfie properties, dosages, preparations, and reactions of tfie addicting, 
and hallucinogenic drugs. Alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, sedatives, stimu- 
lants, tranquilizers, LSD, mescaline, cannabis, narcotics, and anti- 
depressants. 



^|_J O 1 1 Quantitative Analysis w/ Lab. 
^-**' ^.11 Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 106. 

Theory and laboratory training in the preparation of solutions, volu- 
metric and gravimetric analysis, and the use of special laboratory 
instruments. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



CH301-302 



Organic Chemistry w/Lab. 
Credit, 8 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 105. 

The common reactions of aliphatic and aromatic chemistry, emphasis 
on reaction mechanisms. Laboratory assignments on the technique 
needed in organic synthesis. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 



CH 321-322 



Plastics and Polymer Chemistry. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106, CH 302. 

All phases of the plastics and polymers field, including the chemistry 

involved, methods, properties of the plastics, and uses of the various 

materials. 



/^LJ '3 1 Essentials of Fire Chemistry w/Lab. 
^^'> *J«JI Credit, 3 semester hours (same as FS 301). 

Prerequisite: Junior Classification. 

The examination of the chemical requirements for combustion, the 
chemistry of fuels and explosive mixtures, and the study of the 
various methods of stopping combustion of fires. Analysis of the 
properties of materials affecting fire behavior. Detailed examination 
of the basic properties of fire. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



^LJ OOO Fire Protection Fluids and Systems w/Lab. 
>*>i I kJsJ^ Credit, 3 semester hours (same as FS 303). 

Prerequisite: CH 331. 

Chemical properties of fluids used in fire suppression systems and 
operations. Design of water supply and distribution for fire protection. 
Laboratory study of operational and hydraulics problems. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



CH341 



CH351 



CH401-402 



CH411 



Instrumental Methods of Analysis w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106, CH 211. 

The theory of various instrumental methods, including visible ultraviolet 
and infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, 
and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Laboratory identifica- 
tion of compounds by the methods discussed in the lectures. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

Qualitative Organic Chemistry w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 302. 

A one-semester laboratory course dealing with the systematic identi- 
fication of organic compounds. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

Advanced Organic Chemistry. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 302. 

The mechanism of organic reactions, advanced problems in synthetic 

organic chemistry, and special topics such as stereochemistry and 

photochemistry. 

Arson Investigation w/Lab. 

Credit, 3 semester hours (same as FS 402) 
Prerequisite: CH 332. 

Methods used in starting fires and methods of detection of fires started 
by arsonists. Instrumental methods that may be used to assist in the 
investigation of fires started under suspicious circumstances. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry w/Lab. 
Credit, 8 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 431. Corequisite: CH 432. 

Modern structural concepts, reaction mechanisms, the application of 

principles of physical chemistry and bonding theory in inorganic 

chemistry. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

^LJ yiOl ylQO Physical Chemistry w/Lab. 
V^n '-t-M:3 I -*-l-0^ Credit, 8 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106, PH 202, and M 203. 

Fundamental laws of gases, thermodynamics, the theory of atomic and 
molecular structure, kinetics, and phase equilibria. Laboratory work 
enables the student to evaluate this subject by studying physical and 
chemical data. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

^|_l ^OO Advanced Physical Chemistry. 
^^*^ '+*J*J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 432. 

Emphasis on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, statistical 
mechanics, molecular bonding theory, and spectroscopy. Offered only 
in the evening. 



CH 421-422 



76 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



^11 AAA Analytical Chemistry w/Lab. 
^>rl *+«+ I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 431. Corequisite: CH 432. 

Application of instrumental methods to inorganic and organic methods 
of analysis, including mass, ultraviolet and infrared spectrophotometry, 
chromatography, and electroanalytical analysis. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



CH 451-452 



Thesis for Undergraduate Chemistry 

Majors w/Lab. 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 302, CH 432. 

An original investigation in the laboratory under the guidance of a 
member of the department. Oral discussion of the completed work 
before the staff at the end of the second semester. Final thesis report. 
Departmental approval required. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 



^|_| /I CI Chemical Spectroscopy: Technique. 
^^rn *-*\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH432. 

Introduction to the elementary theory w/ith emphasis on techniques 
and interpretation of data obtained in applications of infrared, Raman, 
visible ultraviolet, nuclear quadrupole, electron spin, and nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the solution of chemical problems. 
Offered only in the evening. 



CH 51 1-51 2 



Seminar I and II. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 302, CH 432. 

Reports and discussions in various fields of chemistry reviewed by 

students and staff. 



CH599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 credit hours per semester with 

a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 

Plant Visitations. Credit, none. 

Open to junior and senior chemistry majors. Visits to plants in the area 
to investigate plant and laboratory facilities in the chemical Industry. 



SC 361 -362 



Biochemistry w/Lab. 
Credit, 8 semester hours. 

See description under Science and Biology. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING John C. Martin, Chairman 



^-'t- ^iV-' • Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 108 and M118 (Note: M118 may be taken concur- 
rently.) 

Composition and resolution of forces in two and three dimensions. 
Equilibrium of forces in stationary systems. Analysis of trusses. 
Centroids and second moments of areas, distributed forces, friction, 
shear and bending moment diagrams. 



CE202 



Mechanics of Materials I. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE201. 

Elastic behavior of structural elements under axial, flexural, and tor- 
sional loading. Stress in and deformation of members, including beams. 
Lectures supplemented with laboratory exercises. 

/^C" OO*^ Surveying I. 

^-'C- ^-^J'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Theory and practice of engineering measurements using tape, level, 
and transit. Practice in topographic mapping, making of profiles, and 
computations to determine areas of land volumes of earthwork. 

^p- 0/^/1 Water Supply and Sanitary Engineering. 
^^^ ^W*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introduction to the principles of water supply and waste treatment and 
disposal systems. Course covers, in a qualitative manner, topics in 
CE402 and CE404. This course cannot be taken, for credit, by Civil 
Engineering majors. 

C^C OOl Transportation Engineering. 
^-'C. OW I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Development, organization, administration, and interrelation of trans- 
portation systems and facilities, including highways, railroads, airport, 
rapid transit systems, waterways, and pipe lines. Emphasis placed on 
economics of location of resources, industry, and population. 

^p- OO^ Building Construction. 
^'tl OW^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Initiation into the planning and anatomy of buildings, materials avail- 
able and their uses, some principles of construction procedures, 
general estimating of costs, and relative merits of various types of 
construction. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



77 



CE303 



steel Design and Construction. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequsite: CE202. 

Analysis, design, and construction of steel structures. Design of 
frames, members, connections, and other related topics. Tension mem- 
bers, compression members, beams, girders, trusses, and rigid frames. 
Fabrication and erection, including shop practice. 



A^p- O/^^ Soil Mechanics. 

^>^ Ow*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 203 and CE 202. 

Structural composition of the earth's crust and the mechanics of its 
formation. Soil classifications and physical properties are related to 
the principles underlying the behavior of soils subjected to various 
loading conditions. Subsurface exploration and laboratory exercises. 



CE312 



CE305 



Highway Engineering. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE301. 

Study of traffic, methods of making traffic surveys, safety and accident 
records, and methods of traffic control. Emphasis on planning of major 
highways, intersections, and urban streets. Study of pavements, drain- 
age, and general administration and operation. 



^C" O/^^ Hydraulics. 

^-'^ OV-fO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 204. 

The mechanics of fluids and fluid flow. Laminar and turbulent flow. Flow 
in pipes and open channels. Orifices and weirs. Fluid pressures. Wave 
action and erosion. Lectures supplemented with laboratory demonstra- 
tions. 



CE307 



Mechanics of Materials 2. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 202. 

Elastic and plastic behavior of structural elements such as beams, 
columns, and shafts under direct and combined loading. Ultimate 
strength design, theory of failure, composite member design, and an 
introduction to statically indeterminate structures. 



^F" '30W Surveying II. 

^^■^ ^JV-'t? Credit 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE203. 

A continuation of Surveying I covering principles of field astronomy, 
hydrographic surveying, and mine and tunnel surveying. An introduc- 
tion to the general principles and use of photogrammetric surveying. 
A study of the boundary and legal aspects of Land Surveying including 
deed research and its application to boundary determination. 



Structural Analysis I. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE202. 

This course presents basic structural engineering topics on the 
analysis and design of structures. Topics studied are load criteria and 
influence lines; force and deflection analysis of beams and trusses; 
analysis of indeterminate structures by approximate methods, super- 
position and moment distribution. Familiarization with framing systems 
will be gained by studying existing structures. 



^CT 01 ^ Concrete Design and Construction. 
^-^f^ >^ i *■*■ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CE307 or CE312. 

Analysis, design, and construction of both plain and reinforced concrete 
structures. Design, utilizing both working stress and ultimate strength 
techniques, of beams, slabs, columns, and walls. Construction methods, 
including forming, reinforcing, concrete placing, prestressing, and pre- 
casting will be described. 



^P" ^01 Foundation Design and Construction. 
^,^i_ '-t\j I CreAit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 304 and CE 314. 

Design of isolated and combined footings, mats, retaining walls, piers, 
abutments, pile foundations, and similar structural elements used to 
safely support buildings, bridges, and other structures. 



/"•CT ZLC^^ ^^^^' Supply and Power. 
^^^- *-'v-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 306. 

Design of water supply, storage, treatment, and distribution systems. 

Principles of ground water as it pertains to water supply and wells. 

Introduction to desalination methods, including economic considerations. 

Water pollution and its control. Principles of hydroelectric power 

development. 



("•p A.Cl'^ ^'^ Planning. 

^^'— "TV-f^j Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Engineering, social economics, political, and legal aspects of city 
planning. Emphasis placed on case studies of communities in Connecti- 
cut. Zoning. Principles and policies of redevelopment. 



^P" AC) A Sanitary Engineering. 
^-'^- ^*^<^'-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: C£ 402 or permission of instructor. 
Planning of sewer systems, methods of sewage treatment, general 
construction and operation of plants, handling of industrial and solid 
wastes. Incineration. 



78 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



CE405 



Indeterminate Structures. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CE 307 or CE 312. 

Analysis and design of continuous beams, rigid frames, arches, and 

multi-story structures of concrete and steel. Elastic and plastic design 

principles. 

^C" ,^07 Contracts and Specifications. 
^-'^" '+V-' -^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 302 or permission of instructor. 
Principles of contract formation, execution, and termination. Study 
of specifications and practice in their preparation. Other legal matters 
of importance to engineers. 



CE501 



Design Project. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 407 or permission of instructor. 
Planning and design of an -engineering project, starting with map and 
general requirements as provided by an owner. Preparation of design 
drawings for the layout and structures. Estimate of cost. Planning 
construction procedures and schedule. 

/^P" CIQQ Independent Study. 
^^^- *-*^^' Credit, 1-3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of faculty member to 
explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. He must have the consent of the faculty director and the 
faculty director's chairman. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE L. Craig Parker, Jr., Director 
Robert Murillo, Undergraduate Academic Coordinator 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of the structures and processes in the administration of 
justice: analysis of the criminal justice sequence including the 
foundations of criminal law, the elements and procedures of conviction, 
and the various dispositions available for convicted offenders. 

C^ I 1 0.4 Police Organization and Administration. 
^<-*'-^ ' yJ^-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CJ 103. 

A detailed study of police organization and procedures within a police 
department and consideration of the principles of organization and 
methods adopted by progressive departments to insure effective 
service to the community. 



/"• I 1 O^ Interpersonal Relations. 
^^>J I \J*J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; Junior status required. 

Critical factors in relating effectively with others. Crises intervention 
and techniques employed in relating to deeply distressed individuals. 
Emphasis on supervisor-supervisee relations, police officer-citizen, 
counselor-client, etc. Techniques such as Gestlat, role playing, encoun- 
ter, and Satir approach are stressed. 

r^ I 1 OT Correctional Organization and Administration. 
\^>J I \J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Emphasis is placed on the principles of administration in the correc- 
tional setting, including budgeting and financial control, recruitment 
and development of staff, administrative decision-making, public 
relations, and other correctional administrative functions. 

C^ I 1 OQ Correctional Treatment Programs. 
^^'^ ' *-'^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Various treatment modalities employed in the rehabilitation of 
offenders. Field visits to various correctional treatment facilities such 
as half-way houses and community based treatment programs. 

^ I Op|1 Principles of Criminal Investigation. 
^^»J ^V^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to criminal investigation in the field. Conduct at the 
crime scene, interview and interrogation of witnesses and suspects, 
the use of informants, and the techniques of surveillance. The special 
techniques employed in particular kinds of investigation as well as 
presentation of the police case in court. 

Introduction to Forensic Science. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CJ 201. 

A classroom lecture-discussion session and a practical laboratory 
period. Forensic Science (Criminalistics): the observation, collection, 
positive identification, and preservation of physical, chemical, and 
biological evidence for court presentation. The connection between 
the evidence found at the crime scene and the identification, appre- 
hension, and conviction of the criminal. Fingerprints, identification of 
hairs and 'fibers, chemicals, narcotics, blood, semen, glass, soil, and 
wood. Imprint and impression taking, bullet comparison, document 
examination, and various photographic methods. 

r^ I ^17 O 1 ft American Legal System I and II. 
^^^^ ^ ' ' "^ * O Credit, 6 semester hours. 
The process through which justice is administered. History of the 
American Legal System. The Constitution of the United States as it 
applies to police forces. Also, rules of evidence with attention given 
to judicial notice, presumptions, the nature of real and circumstantial 
evidence, burden of proof, province of court and jury, documentary 
evidence, hearsay evidence, confessions, and admissions of witnesses. 
Particular emphasis will be given to evidence in criminal cases, pre- 
sumptions of the penal law, the status of illegally obtained evidence, 
admission of memorandum book entries, dying declarations, and in- 
voluntary confessions. 



CJ215 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



79 



CJ221 



Juvenile Delinquency. 

Credit, 3 semester hours, (see SO 231) 
Prerequisites: P HI and SO 113. 

An analysis of delinquent behavior in American society: examination 
of the theories and social correlates of delinquency, and the socio- 
legal processes and apparatus for dealing with juvenile delinquency. 

/^ I 0/^1 Group Dynamics In Criminal Justice. 
\^^ 'J\J I Credit: 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111 Psychology. 

Focus on issues related to the development and interaction of indi- 
viduals in groups. Social psychological theory and research as it 
relates to Criminal Justice. 

{^ I OO'^ Behaviorism: Applications In Criminal Justice. 
\-*U <3Kja. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Pill Psychology. 

Discussion of basic assumption of learning theory that apply to treat- 
ment and educational contexts. Token economies and other behavior 
modification situations will be explored. Notions of reinforcement, 
punishment and extinction are stressed. 

^ I O/^O Q/^/1 Forensic Science Laboratory I & II. 
\^^ *^'^«->-*->'^'+ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Greater attention given to specific topics and to laboratory testing 
and identifications than in CJ 215. In the classroom the laboratory or 
practical procedures are outlined and discussed. The laboratory work 
involves testing and identification of evidence, and more detailed 
procedures are undertaken than in CJ 215. An example would be the 
casting of hairs and fibers for microscopic identification of material as 
containing a narcotic or blood. 

Laboratory Fee: $15.00 per semester. 

Probation and Parole. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

An in-depth analysis of probation, parole and varied alternatives to 
imprisonment: examination of findings of evaluative research of pro- 
bation and parole and results with current and experimental non-in- 
stitutional correctional programs. 

C^ I OO^ Correctional Counseling. 
V^^ >^\JO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

Fundamental psychological counseling theory as it applies to treat- 
ment of offenders- 

C^ I O 1 1 Criminology. 

\-*U *J I I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to the principles and concepts of Criminology: analysis 
of the social context of criminal behavior, including a review of 
criminological theory, the nature and distribution of crime, the soci- 
ology of criminal law, and the societal reactions to crime and criminals. 



CJ 400 



CJ 309 



Criminal Justice Problems Seminar. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

An examination of theoretical and philosophical issues impinging upon 
the administration of justice: the problems of reconciling legal and 
theoretical ideals in various sectors of the criminal justice system 
with the realities of practice. 

/^ I y\r\^ Police-Community Relations. 
^^*J *+v-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Designed to put the police and community into a broad theoretical 
context. Sociological and environmental implications examined. Atten- 
tion given to police practices which have caused much public hostility 
and which have isolated law enforcement from the rest of society. 

Criminal Law. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The scope, purpose, definition, and classification of Criminal Law. 
Offenses against the person, habitation and occupancy, property and 
other offenses. Responsibility in general, and limitations on criminal 
capacity and its modifying circumstances. Special Defenses. The Con- 
necticut Penal Code will also be discussed. 



CJ404 



CJ 405 



Seminar In Criminal Justice. 
Credit: 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior status required. 

An intensive analysis of variable topics of critical relevance in the 
administration of justice: a seminar exposing the student to a con- 
centrated learning experience conducive to acquiring special expertise 
in a specific academic area. (The theme for 1973-74 is Violence.) 

C" I AOkQ Research Project. 
^^^ *-l-c:'0 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior status required. 

The student carries out an original research project in a criminal 

justice setting and reports his study. 

r-" I ^QQ Independent Study. 
^-'•^ •+CJ7 Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 
maximum of 12. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

Opportunity for the student, under the direction of a faculty member, 

to explore an area of interest to him. 

(~* I K/~\ 1 Criminal Justice Internship. 
V_>^ sJKJ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the department chair- 
man. 

This program provides monitored field experience with selected federal, 
state, or local criminal justice agencies or forensic science labora- 
tories subject to academic guidance and review. BA 449 Independent 
Study may be substituted with approval of the chairman. 



80 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ECONOMICS Franklin B. Sherwood, Chairman 



EC320 



Mathematical Methods In Economics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 115 - M 116; or M 127, M 115; m BA 118 - BA 128. 
Applications of various mathematical concepts and techniques in 
macroeconomic and microeconomic analysis. Special emphasis on the 
design and interpretation of mathematical models of economic 
phenomena. 



P"/~» 1 Q*^ Principles of Economics I. 
^■^-^ ' *JO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Foundations of economic analysis, including economic progress; re- 
sources, technology, private enterprise, profits, and the price system. 
Macroeconomics including national income, employment, and economic 
growth. Price levels, money and banking, the Federal Reserve System, 
theory of income, employment and prices, business cycles, and 
problems of monetary, fiscal, and stabilization policy. 



rr/^ *^*^fi Money and Banking. 
^-^^ ♦-?*->t> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

Nature and functions of money, commercial banking system. Federal 
Reserve System and the Treasury, monetary theory, financial institu- 
tions, international financial relationships, history of money and 
monetary policy in the United States, and current problems of 
monetary policy. 



FT^ 1 *^^ Principles of Economics II. 
^■^^^ ' *->«-•■ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EC 133. 

Microeconomics including markets and market structure and the allo- 
cation of resources. The distribution of income, the public economy, 
the international economy, and current economic problems. 

C"^ '^OO Economic History of the U. S. 
CV-» >J\J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Development of American economic life in the various stages of agri- 
culture, trade, industry, finance, and labor. Change of economic prac- 
tices and institutions, particularly in business, banking, and labor. 
The changing role of government. 

CT^ '^1 O Principles of Economic Geography. 
'-^^ *^ ' ^-^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Distribution of resources, industries, and population in relation to 
physical, economic, and technological factors. Principles of economic 
location and regional development. 



pr^ *^ 1 1 Government Regulation of Business. 
*— ^^ »J I I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

An appraisal of public policy toward transportation, trusts, monopolies, 

public utilities, and other forms of government regulation of economic 

activity. 



P"^ *^1^ Public Finance. 

•— ^'^ *J I •-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

Theory and practice of public taxation. The budgetary process at al 

levels of government. 



EC340 



Microeconomic Analysis. 



Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

Study of the determination of the prices of goods and production 
factors in a free market economy and the role of prices in the allo- 
cation of resources. 



EC 342 



International Economics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

The role, importance, and currents of international commerce; the 
balance of international payments; foreign exchange and international 
finance; international trade theory; problems of balance of payments 
adjustment; trade restrictions; international control of raw materials; 
economic development and foreign aid. 



P"^ '^AC^ Comparative Economic Systems. 
'— ^^ *J*+0 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

A comparative study of the economic organization, resource alloca- 
tion, and growth problems of the United States, British, and French 
economic systems and the economic systems of the U.S.S.R., Poland, 
and Yugoslavia. 



EC350 



Economics of Labor Relations. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

History of the union movement in the United States, union structure 
and government, problems of collective bargaining, economics of the 
labor market, wage theories, unemployment, governmental policy and 
control, and problems of security. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



81 



Cf' ^10 Econometrics. 

^^^ *+ ' '>-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EC 320. 

The application of mathematical and statistical methods to both 

micro- and macro-economic policy issues. 



C"/^ AAC\ Economic Development. 
^>-> *+*+>-/ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

Economic problems of underdeveloped countries and the policies 

necessary to induce growth. Individual projects required. 



ED 324 



EC 442 



Economic Thought. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133-134. 

The development of economic doctrine from mercantilism and Adam 
Smith to the thinking of modern day theorists. Emphasis upon the 
main currents of thought with the applicability to present-day prob- 
lems. Individual study and reporting. 



P"/^ AA.^ Macroeconomic Analysis. 
^^^ *+*t«J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; EC 133-134, and A 111. 

An investigation of the makeup of the national income and an analysis 
of the factors that enter info its determination; an examination of the 
roles of consumption, investment, government finance, and money 
influencing national income and output, employment, the price level, 
and rate of growth; policies for economic stability and growth. 



EC450 



Thesis. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A written report on a research project. No class meetings, but periodic 
conferences with the thesis supervisor. 



ED 346 



TEACHER EDUCATION Philip Olgin, Director 



History and Philosophy of Education. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HS HI, 112. 

A critical study of philosophical ideas and conflicting philosophies of 
Education viewed from historical perspectives and compared with cur- 
rent practices. A major purpose of this course is to develop an objec- 
tive approach to educational points of view accompanied by discrim- 
inating historical research. Implications for contemporary educational 
practice are reviewed. 

Directed Observation of the Secondary School. 
Credit. 3 semester hours. 

3 periods weekly plus Laboratory to be arranged. 
Structured as a Practlcum. Directed visits to selected secondary 
schools. Laboratory field experiences include participation, tutoring, 
group meetings, and individual conferences. Emphasis on the prin- 
ciples and problems of the secondary schools as developed through 
group and individual laboratory experiences. 

P"pj 'a "70 Methods and Materials in Teaching the Major 
^•t-f -^ / ^<J Fields in the Secondary Schools. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Pill; ED 225. 
Prerequisites or Corequisite: ED 324 and ED 346. 
Assists the student in the development of objectives, learning activ- 
ities, teaching procedures, organization and presentation of materials 
to be taught in the secondary schools, investigative techniques, and 
the understanding of new trends in the major field. This course is 
required for certification as a secondary school teacher in the State 
of Connecticut. 

ED370M— Methods and Materials in Teaching li/lathematics in the 
Secondary School (For Mathematics Education Majors only.) 

ED370S— Methods and Materials in Teaching General Science in the 
Secondary Schools (For General Science Education Majors only.) 

p-r-k AA'7 Teaching in the Secondary School. 
C-f-f '■r^^ / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ED 346. 

General methods of teaching, problems confronting the inexperienced 
teacher such as discipline, lesson plans, teaching procedures and 
techniques, planning assignments, testing, grading, reporting to par- 
ents, and co-curricular activities; procedures are adapted to the major 
field of the student. 



ED 225 



The Adolescent Student. 
Credit, 3 semester hours 

Prerequisite: Pill. 

Study of the theory and principles of the development of the adoles- 
cent from puberty to maturity. The physical, intellectual, emotional, 
social, and moral growth and development of the adolescent. 



p-r^ Afi^^ The Teaching-Learning Process. 
^I— ' **^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P HI. 

Psychological principles underlying teaching procedures in the class- 
room; application of psychological findings and methods to educational 
practice; learning, motivation, and individual differences as they 
apply to effective teaching. 



82 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ED 498-499 



Directed Observation and Supervised 
Teaching in Secondary Schools. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequsities: ED 324, ED 346, ED 370. 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: ED 447, ED 465. 

Field experience in selected secondary schools. Student teachers have 

the opportunity to observe secondary teachers in action and are guided 

to discuss their reactions with college supervisors and cooperating 

teachers. Prospective teachers assess problems in their major field 

and gain experience in effective management and instruction. 



EE336 



Instrumentation Electronics w/Lab. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE223 and M 118. 

Cannot be taken for credit by electrical engineering students. 
An introduction into instrumentation electronics aiming to provide a 
working knowledge and understanding of electronic instruments and 
controls as used in industrial processes. Starting with simple electrical 
measurements, the course subsequently deals with power supplies, 
transistor and vacuum tube amplifiers, and oscillators. Practical servo 
systems and operational amplifiers are treated, as well as simple 
circuits for electronic switching, and digital counting. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Gerald J. Kirwin, Chairman 



EE 223-224 



Principles of Electrical Engineering 

I and II. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IVl 118 and PH 209 concurrently. 

Basic concepts in modern network theory and network techniques in 
analyzing simple and complex electric circuits. Definitions of current 
voltage relations, circuit elements, resistance, inductance, and capaci- 
tance. Circuit equilibrium equations, transformation, Kirchoff's laws, 
network theorems, passive and active networks, superposition. Thevenin 
and Norton's theorems, d-c transients, solution of simple electric cir- 
cuits in the sinusoidal steady state by vector and complex algebra. 
Impedance, capacitance, and resonance concepts, single phase and 
three phase alternating currents and voltages, power relations. Magnetic 
fields and circuits, electromechanical energy conversion. 

P"cr OC^ti Electrical Engineering Lab. I. 
C-C- ^^-^ Credit. 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE223 or permission of instructor. 
Laboratory experiments involved with familiarization with measure- 
ment procedures, equipment, and components. Laboratory prepares 
student with techniques to be used in EE Labs II and III. 
Note: Part-time students are charged for a standard 3 semester hour 
course. 



EE 331-332 



Network Analysis I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 203 and EE 224. 

A study and analysis of lumped linear electrical networks. Formula- 
tion of network integro-differential equations and their solution with 
emphasis on matrix notations. Introduction to the Laplace transform 
and its use in network analysis. Pole-zero analysis. Fourier series. 
Network topology and signalflow graphs. Polyphase circuits. Two port 
theory. Mutually coupled circuits. Transient and sinusoidal analysis. 
Tuned circuits. Adjustable circuits. 



C'p' O^l Analog and Digital Computer Applications. 
^-^- 0*+ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 347, EE331 and M 204. 

The application of the analog and digital computers in the solution of 
engineering problems. The concept of an algorithm, numerical analysis, 
and programming. 

p-p" O^O Electromechanical Energy Conversion. 
C-^- <->'-r<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE361 and M 204. 

Introduction to the principles used to explain the behavior of certain 
electromechanical devices; lumped parameter electromechanics; in- 
troduction to rotating machinery; equilibrium and stability of these 
devices; fields in moving matter; energy conversion dynamics. 



EE344 



Electrical Machines. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE343. 

The fields, forces and torques in magnetic systems. Theory, character- 
istics and applications of direct current machines. Theory, perform- 
ance and applications of transformers, AC generators, synchronous 
motors, single and polyphase induction motors. 



EE 347-348 



Electronic Devices and Circuits I 

and II. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 331 concurrently. 

Study of the fundamental principles and uses of electron devices in 
electronic circuits. Transistor circuits: Bias stability, models, and fre- 
quency response. Multi-stage circuits, feedback amplifiers. Amplifiers 
and RC coupled amplifiers. Power and audio amplifiers. Rectifiers. Field 
effect transistors. Integrated circuits. 

P"P" *a^Q Electrical Engineering Lab. II. 
*— *— *J*+^^ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 348 concurrently. 

Laboratory experiments and problems associated with electrical meas- 
urements, electronic devices, and electrical circuits. 
Note: Part-time students are charged for a standard 3 semester hour 
course. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



83 



prcr 'QC^I Electrical Systems Analysis. 
^•^— "^"^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites-. EE331 and IVI 204. 

A study of the techniques for analyzing linear systems, dual systems, 
Fourier series and integral, convolution and superposition integral and 
their use in the solution of engineering problems. Feedback and 
sample data systems. Introduction to and use of signal flow graphs. 
Pole-zero analysis. Distributed networks. Stability criterion. 

per *3KO Physical Electronics. 
^ *—*-'*-' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 224. 

Introduction to the physical processes involved in semi conductors. 
From energy band theory, carrier concentrations are inferred. Excess 
carriers and photo conductive devices, p-u junctions, diodes, funda- 
mentals of lasers and physics of transistor operation, FET's. 



EE438 



Electric Power Transmission. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 437. 

The fundamentals of electric generation, transmission, and distribu- 
tion. Transmission line analysis and performance using circle diagrams. 
Load flow studies. Power system stability. 



P"P" /\y\^ Communications Theory. 
^■^' *****ii' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 351. 

The analysis of communications circuits and the design of the com- 
ponents of communication systems. Signal analysis, transmission of 
signals, power density spectra, amplitude, frequency, and pulse modu- 
lation. Performance of communications system and signal to noise 
ratio. 



P'C' OEE OC£: Switching and Logical Design I and II. 
^^ OiJi?-*3^%J Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102; EE356 permission of instructor. 
Study of the fundamental concepts of digital systems. Boolean algebra 
and its use in logical design. Basic logic circuits. Map and tabular 
methods of minimization. Synchronous and asynchronous sequential 
circuits. Hazards, arithmetic operations, coding, storage elements, 
logical design techniques, threshold logic. 

P"P" 'Qf?1 Electromagnetic Theory. 
^■^- »-'>-' I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 203 and EE224. 

Basic electromagnetic theory as related to the static fields of electric 
charges and the magnetic fields of steady electric currents. Funda- 
mental field laws. Maxwell's equations, energy distributions, scalar 
and vector potentials, method of images, boundary relations, magneti- 
zation, polarization, time varying electric and magnetic fields, field 
plotting. Vector mathematics. 



EE420 



Introduction to Statistical Communications. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE351. 

The elements of probability theory. Continuous random variables. 
Characteristic functions and central limit theorem. Stationary random 
processes and auto correlation. Power density spectrum of a random 
process. Application of probability theory to random processes. 

P'P' ^0*7 Industrial Power Systems Engineering. 
^■^' *+*3' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE331 and EE332. 

Study of the components forming a power system, its economic opera- 
tion; symmetrical components and sequence impedances in the study 
of faults and load-flow studies. 



EE 446-447 



Pulse and Digital Circuits I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE331 and EE 347. 

A study of circuits used for digital computers and pulse applications. 
Topics covered are: linear and non-linear wave-shaping, digital logic 
circuits, switching circuits (multivibrators), voltage comparators, nega- 
tive resistance switching circuits, computer memories, voltage and 
current sweep circuits. Emphasis in the second half of the sequence is 
placed on current integrated technology with special projects. 



EE 450-451 



Analysis and Design of Active 
Networks I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 331, EE 348, and M 204. 

A study of the techniques used in the analysis and design of active 
circuits, feedback oscillators, operational amplifiers, analog systems, 
power supplies and regulators, power circuits and systems, distortion 
analysis, silicon controlled rectifiers, high frequency transistor models, 
active filters and broadbanding techniques, and distributed networks, 
feedback analysis using root locus techniques. Gyrators and negative 
impedance converters. 



P'P" ^KO Electrical Engineering Lab. III. 
^■^' '•**J>^ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Senior Status in Electrical Engineering. 
Laboratory experiments and problems associated with electrical 
machinery, microwaves, digital devices, electronic devices, and auto- 
matic controls. 

Note: Part time students are charged for a standard 3 semester hour 
course. 



84 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



P"P" ^EC Feedback Systems. 
'—^ *-r*J*J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 351. 

Study of physical system using feedback to form a closed loop. Investi- 
gate stability from Root Locus, Routti, Bode, and Nyquist viewpoints. 
Performance and design, including feedback compensation, multiple 
inputs, and disturbances. Mathematical modeling of system elements 
and systems. 



P'O 1 pj'y Introduction to Engineering. 
*— *-^ ' '-' ■' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Overview; of the problems, perspectives, and methods of the engineer- 
ing profession. Modeling of real world problems for purposes of 
optimization, decision making, and design. Practical techniques of 
problem formulation and analysis. 



EE462 



Mic'owave Fundamentals. 
Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; EE361. 

The application and development of electromagnetic field theory to 
wave propagation, reflection in various media, and waveguides. Various 
modes of propagation in rectangular, circular, and coaxial waveguides. 
Dipole antenna element and radiation plots. Antenna arrays. Trans- 
mission line analysis and the use of Smith charts. 



ENGLISH Paul Marx, Chairman 



EE500 



Senior Seminar. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

Open to Seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Special topics in the field of electrical engineering. Arranged to suit 

the interest and requirements of the student, under the supervision 

of a staff member. 



CrC" C^04 Laboratory Thesis. 
*-'^- ^^'^*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

Open to Seniors in Electrical Engineering. 

Advanced laboratory testing and special problems. Students work on 

problems of their selection with the approval of the instructor. The 

work may be done in the form of a thesis or series of experiments. 



Kay Stevenson, Director of Freshman 
English 



CT A College Preparatory English. 
*— '^ One semester. No credit. 

A review of the fundamentals of English for students who do not meet 
the English requirements for admission to the University. Practice given 
in writing as well as in grammar. 



P'O Reading Laboratory. 

*— '-' One semester. No credit. 

Helps the student to read faster with greater comprehension, to in- 
crease vocabulary, and to study more effectively. Supervised reading, 
training films, exercises, and discussions. 



Crp* English as a Second Language. 
^-•' One semester. No credit. 

Designed for foreign-born students whose English is inadequate to do 
college-level work. Particular emphasis on individual pronunciation 
problems and use of American English idioms. Laboratory required. 



ENGINEERING SCIENCE 

Buddy Saleeby, Coordinator 



pre 1 /~)0 Technology in Modern Society. 
*—^ ' WO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Scientific and technological developments and their implications for the 
future of society. Prospects and problems in communications, energy 
sources, automation, transportation, and other technologies. Use and 
control of technological resources for public benefit. 



El 1 O English Composition. 
' ' O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on English Placement Examina- 
tion or completion of EA College Preparatory English. 
Theme writing with emphasis on thematic content, paragraphing, sen- 
tence construction, grammatical principles, and diction. Reading of 
essays to stimulate thought and illustrate rhetorical principles. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 113. 

Further practice in theme writing. Reading of poetry, fiction, and 

drama in order to develop skill in analyzing and interpreting literature. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



85 



F 1 1 Zl ^P^""^- 

»—'•** Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A disciplined approach to oral communication. Objectives are to develop 
proficiency in locating, organizing, and presenting material and to help 
the student gain confidence and fluency when speaking extempor- 
aneously. 



P" O^ 1 The Essay. 

^~ ^-^J ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the essay and magazine article as characteristic art forms 
of our time. Readings from William Hazlitt to the present. The social 
and historic impact of selected great essays will be considered and 
the structure and art of contemporary essays will be discussed. 



E201-202 



World Literature I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 113. 

Selected translations of non-Western literature and of Western litera- 
ture from Homer to the present. Emphasis upon literary, cultural, and 
philosophical values. 



E 267-268 



Creative Writing. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 206 and Instructor's consent. 

Practice in writing the short story, poetry, drama, or non-fiction; 
choice of genre based upon inclination and ability of the student. 
Analysis of published materials and student work. 



E211-212 



Survey of English Literature I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: E 113, E 206. 

Readings in English Literature from its beginnings to the present, with 

attention to its historical and social backgrounds. 



p" O 1 O Survey of American Literature I. 

^- ^^ ' *-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Intellectual and literary movements from Colonial times to the Civil 
War. 



CT O 1 ^ Survey of American Literature II. 
^— ^- * "^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Intellectual and literary movements from the Civil War to the present. 



E 21 7-21 8 



Survey of Black American Literature. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Black American poets, novelists, essayists, and dramatists from the 
Colonial Era to the present, including such writers as Frederick 
Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, Countee Cullen, Richard Wright, James 
Baldwin, Leroi Jones, and Eldrldge Cleaver. 



E 220 "^P^f* Writing. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 113. 

Studv of the standards inherent in effective reporting, both formal 
and Informal, and of the principles of business letter writing, with 
practice in writing letters, memos, and reports. To be offered only in 
Fall semester. 



E 260 ^^^ ^*""^' ^^'"^' 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A critical study of the best stories of American and British writers as 
well as stories, in translation, of writers of other nationalities and 
cultures, French, German, Russian, Latin American, African. 



P" 0/^1 Literary Criticism and Scholarship. 
^- ♦-^'-' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Ma|or critical theories, with readings from Plato and Aristotle to the 
present. Bibliographic tools and methods of research. 

pr 'QO^ History of the English Language. 
*— ■ ♦^v-'^i Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development and structure of English, including its Indo-European 
origins and the elements of Anglo-Saxon, f^ajor emphasis on twiddle 
Tnglish and the transition to Modern English. Some study of the 
distinctive coinage of American English. 

P" OOO Sixteenth-Century Poetry and Prose. 
*— *-?^*-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The social and historical backgrounds of the English Renaissance; 
readings in the prose writers and in Wyatt, Surrey, Spenser, Sidney, 
and their contemporaries. 

pr •apf; English Drama to 1642. 
^- ^-'^v? Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of the English drama from its beginnings to the 
middle of the seventeenth century, excluding Shakespeare. Major em- 
phasis upon the Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. 



E 341-342 



Shakespeare. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

E 341 IS a prerequisite for E 342. 

Introduction to representative comedies, histories, plays, tragedies, and 

poems. 



p OCO Literature of the Romantic Era. 
^- '^*J<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Poetry and prose of the major Romantics — Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb, and Hazlitt— with attention given to the 
milieu of the writers, the Continental background, and theories of 
Romanticism. 



86 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Poetry and prose from 1830-1900. The works of Tennyson, Browning, 
Arnold, Swinburne, Carlyle, Mill, Newman, Ruskin, and others studied 
in the light of the social, political, and religious problems of the 
period. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

British fiction, drama, and poetry from 1900 to the present. Includes 
works of Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Huxley, Forster, Shaw, Yeats, 
Auden, Spender, and Dylan Thomas. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Major writers of prose and poetry during the period 1600-1660: Donne, 
Milton, Burton, Bacon, Herbert, and others. 

EO"7 1 Literature of the Neoclassic Era. 
*^ ^ • Credit, 3 semester hours. 

British writers of the period 1660-1760, with emphasis upon Dryden, 
Pope, Swift, Johnson, and others. 



E^pjCr Modern Drama. 
'-r\^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Principal movements in Continental, British, and American drama from 
Ibsen to the present. 



E 406-409 



Continental Literature. 

Credit, 3 semester hours each course. 

Selected poetry, drama, and fiction, in translation, of the European 
masters, primarily Russian, French, German, or Spanish. Topic to be 
announced for each semester. 



E,^ 1 1 .Zl 1 ^ ^^^ Literature of Africa. 
^' ' • "*+ ' ^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The chief writings, in English and In translation, of the prose writers, 
poets, and dramatists of the African nations. 

E^~7Q Contemporary American Literature. 
*^ f ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Intensive study of developments in American fiction, poetry, and drama 
of our time. Readings in the works of such writers as Wolfe, Mala- 
mud. Bellow, Theodore Roethke, Robert Lowell, Arthur Miller, and 
Tennessee Williams. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A detailed reading and critical study of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, 
with some study of his predecessors and the medieval cultural milieu. 



E 481 -498 



p- 'aOf^ The English Novel I. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of the novel in England from Defoe to Dickens and 
Thackeray. 

EOQ1 The English Novel II. 

'^^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of the novel in England from George Eliot and Hardy 
to the present. 

EOQO Literature of the American Renaissance. 
'^^ ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Intensive study of the writings of such figures as Emerson, Thoreau, 
Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman, whose works are analyzed in the 
light of the influences and traditions which led to America's cultural 
independence. 



p" Ar\^ Modern Poetry. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the works of representative twentieth-century British, 
American, and Continental poets. 



Studies In Literature. 

Credit, 3 semester hours each course. 

Special topics in literature which may include concentration upon a 
single figure, a group of writers, or a literary theme. Several sections, 
each on a different topic, may run concurrently. 



E599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 

maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member to 
explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



FIRE SCIENCE William Nyce, Coordinator 

p"0 OOI Essentials of Fire Chemistry w/Lab. 

* '-' Ov-* I Credit, 3 semester hours (same as CH 331). 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: Junior classification. 

The examination of the chemical requirements for combustion, the 
chemistry of fuels and explosive mixtures, and the study of the vari- 
ous methods of stopping combustion of fires. Analysis of the proper- 
ties of materials affecting fire behavior. Detailed examination of the 
basic properties of fire. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



87 



pro *30^ Principles of Fire Science Technology w/ Lab. 
' *^ OVy^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: Junior classification. 

Effect of fire on different types of construction, classes of occupancy 
hazard, levels of private and public protection, degrees of exterior 
exposure. Types of building construction, private viiater supplies, 
municipal water supplies, and combination systems. Methods of em- 
ployee fire control. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



FS303 



Fire Protection Fluids and Systems w/Lab. 
Credit, 3 semester hours (same as CH 332). 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 

Prerequisite: FS301. 

Chemical properties of fluids used in fire suppression systems and 

operations. Design of water supply and distribution for fire protection. 

Laboratory study of operational and hydraulics problems. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



P'O A_r\'^ Process and Transportation Hazards w/Lab. 
' ■^ *-^^-/0 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: FS 402. 

Special hazards of industrial processing, manufacturing and the trans- 
portation of products and personnel. Analytical approach to hazard 
evaluation and control. Reduction of fire hazards in manufacturing 
processes. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

pre AC^A Special Hazards Control w/Lab. 
' "-^ *+V-/*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: FS 304. 

Types of industrial processes requiring special fire protection treat- 
ment such as heating equipment, flammable liquids, gases, and dusts. 
Emphasis on fundamental theories involved, inspection methods, deter- 
mination of relative hazard, application of codes and standards, and 
economics of installed protection systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



FS304 



Fire Detection and Control w/Lab. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: FS 302. 

Heat, sensitivity, thermostats, fusible elements, fire detection systems, 
design and layouts, alarm systems, power sources, safeguards, munici- 
pal alarm systems, construction, installation and maintenance require- 
ments, standards and codes. Automatic extinguishing systems, design 
and layout of water, gas, and power systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00, 



p*C ^01 Research Project. 

• *^ •-r<^ I Credit, 3 semester hours over two semester period. 

One lecture per week — Junior Year. 

One lecture and one laboratory session per week — Senior Year. 
Development of a student project and a written report in a specified 
area in hre administration, or fire science technology with faculty 
supervision. Grade awarded upon completion of project. This is a two 
semester course. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



P"C AC\^ Ai'son Investigation w/Lab. 

' "-^ '-rKJ^ Credit, 3 semester hours (same as CH 411). 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 

Prerequisite: FS 303. 

Methods used in starting fires and methods of detection of fires started 

by arsonists. Instrumental methods that may be used to assist in the 

investigation of fires started under suspicious circumstances. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Bruce A. French, Coordinator 



FDIOI ir^O Elementary French. 

' "^ I '^ I - I yj^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Stresses pronunciation, aural comprehension, and basic conversation; 
the fundamental principles of grammar; reading comprehension. Not 
open, except by special permission, to students who offer for college 
entrance more than one year of high school French. 



FR201-202 



Intermediate French. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite French 101-102 or equivalent. 

Conversation based on the reading of modern prose texts; drill in 

written and oral self-expression; a review of the principles of grammar. 



FR301-302 



Main Currents of French Literature. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: FR 201-202 or equivalent. 

Writings representative of significant currents in French literature from 
the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century. Opportunity to improve 
listening and speaking ability. Conducted in French. Laboratory 
optional, but recommended. 



88 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



GR 101-102 



Elementary German. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Stresses the fundamental principles of grammar; training in pronun- 
ciation, aural comprefiension, and basic conversation. Some work in 
the language laboratory outside of class may be required. Not open, 
except by special permission, to students who offer for college entrance 
more than one year of high school German. 



GR201-202 



Intermediate German. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

For students with two years of high school German or one year of 
college German. Reading comprehension (some scientific texts), ad- 
vanced study of grammar, composition, and oral self-expression. 



IT101-102 



Elementary Italian. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Stresses pronunciation, aural comprehension, and basic conversation; 
instruction in the fundamental principles of grammar; training in read- 
ing comprehension. Not open, except by special permission, to 
students who offer for college entrance more than one year of high 
school Italian. 



SP201-202 



Intermediate Spanish. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SP 101-102 or equivalent. 

For students with two years of high school Spanish or one year of 
college Spanish. Conversation, advanced study of grammar and com- 
position. Works of prominent Spanish-American authors will be read. 



SP30 1-302 



Main Currents of Spanish Literature. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SP 201-202 or equivalent. 

Writings representative of significant currents in Spanish literature 
from the Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century. Opportunity to improve 
speaking and listening ability. Conducted in Spanish. Laboratory op- 
tional, but recommended. 



HISTORY Thomas Katsaros, Chairman 



IT201-202 



Intermediate Italian. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IT 101-102 or equivalent. 

For students with two years of high school Italian or one year of 
college Italian. Conversation, advanced study of grammar and com- 
position. Reading in classical and modern writers. 



HS 111 



Western Civilization I: to 1700. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Western Civilization from the ancient beginnings to mid-seventeenth 
century. The patterns of the social, cultural, and political aspects of 
ancient, medieval, and early modern eras that have shaped the Western 
tradition. 



RU 101-102 



Elementary Russian. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Fundamental principles of grammar; training in pronunciation, aural 
comprehension, and basic conversation. Some work in the language 
laboratory outside of class may be required. Not open, except by 
special permission, to students who offer for college entrance more 
than one year of high school Russian. Offered every other year. 



I— 1^ 1 1 ^ Western Civilization II: from 1700 to present. 
•■^ 11^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HS 111. 

European history from the Enlightenment to the present. Emphasis on 
economic and social changes, political history, the expansion of 
Europe and its international effects. Nationalism, imperialism, and 
socialism stressed. 



RU201-202 



Intermediate Russian. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

For students with two years of high school or one year of college 
Russian. A review and continuation of the principles of grammar, 
greater emphasis on reading comprehension, further drill in written 
and oral self-expression. Offered every other year. 

^PIOI 10^ Elementary Spanish. 

*^' I V^ I - I \J^. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Stresses pronunciation, aural comprehension, and basic conversation; 
instruction in the fundamental principles of grammar; training in read- 
ing comprehension. Not open, except by special permission, to students 
who offer for college entrance more than one year of high school 
Spanish. 



I— 1^ 1 1 .^ The Economic History of the Western World. 
■■^^ I I *+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HS 112. 

From pre-industrial Europe to the present. Impact of the Industrial 
Revolution and World Wars on national policies, labor, business, inter- 
national economics. The economic development of Western Europe in 
its relation to Soviet Russia and the United States. 

LJC 1 01 History of Science. 
■'*-' ' ^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of the history of science and technology from antiquity to 
the modern period. Particular attention is given to the social and his- 
torical process as an essential aspect of the development of scientific 
concepts. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



89 



LJO 101 History of the Black Man in America. 
n^ 101 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A comprehensive study of the Negro in the United States, including 
African antecedents and an account of slavery. Emancipation and its 
aftermath, and Negro contributions to the Modern Era. 

LJC Oil American History to 1865. 
n^ ^ ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of the American nation from colonial times to 1865. 
Significant economic, social, political, and institutional developments. 

|_|C 01 O American History from 1865. 
•••^ ^ I ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

United States history from the Reconstruction through the contem- 
porary era. Expanding industrialism, the changing concepts of the role 
of government, and the United States in world affairs. 

Lie 001 Comparative European Political Systems. 
n^ ^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

Historical, comparative approach to the political institutions of the 

United Kingdom, U.S.S.R., Federal Republic of Germany, and France. 

Emphasis on the relationship between Western and Eastern political 

systems. 



LjC 01 /^ The History of Modern England. 
n^' *-* ' ^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

British institutions and industrial life from 1688 to the present. Traces 
the movement of British society from its eighteenth-century aristo- 
cratic base through the Liberal experiment of the nineteenth- to twen- 
tieth-century collectivism; England's role in international affairs. 



LJC 01 1 American Colonial and Revolutionary History 
n*-' Oil Jo ,789 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 211-212. 

The political, social and intellectual history of the British Colonies in 
North America leading to the American Revolution; the Revolutionary 
period and the creation of a republican society. 



HS312 



The U. S. in the Twentieth Century. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 211-212. 

Political history, social trends, ano intellectual movements. Study of 
the expansion of the functions of government to meet modern complex 
problems arising from social and cultural trends and from the involve- 
ment of the United States in global politics. 



HS223 



U. S. Diplomatic History. 
Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS211 and HS 212. 

The ideas, trends, and actions of U. S. Diplomacy from the American 

Revolution to the Spanish-American War; from the emergence of the 

United States as a world power to the foreign policy of the Nuclear 

Age. 



l_lO O 1 ^ The History of Germany from 1648. 
ii^ >•■> t ** Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

From the Treaty of Westphalia to the unification of Germany, the 
imperial era, the two World Wars, and the rise and fall of National 
Socialism to the problems of divided Germany today. 



HS231 



Modern Asia. 

Credit. 3 semester hours. 

The ideological and traditional socio-political-economic-diplomatic back- 
ground of East, South, and Southeast Asia, the area's development since 
the impact of the West in the 16th century and the responses to this 
impact. 



LJO O/^Q Social and Intellectual History of the 
n.J OV-^O United States. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: HS 211-212. 

Leading ideas that have shaped important periods of American his- 
tory. The colonial mind and spirit, the democratic upheaval, sectional- 
ism — war — and reconstruction, the industrialization of the country, 
religion as it met the new age of science and economics, agrarian 
revolt, overseas possessions, the beginning of the end of isolation. 



|_JC O 1 C The History of Europe in the Nineteenth Century. 
rl'-' O I ..^J Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111112. 

The main political, economic, and intellectual trends in Europe in the 
period from 1815 to 1914. The effects of industrialism, liberalism, 
and socialism on European society and culture. In international affairs, 
the impact of nationalism on European power politics and the failure 
of the ma|or powers to resolve their differences in the Balkans. 



HS317 



Renaissance and Reformation. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

Economic, political, intellectual, and religious developments in Con- 
tinental Europe from 1300 to 1650; intellectual and social change 
during the transition from medieval to modern times; dynastic con- 
flicts within the emerging state system. 



90 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



|_|C 001 The History of Ancient Greece and Rome. 
•■•^ O^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. 

From the Homeric period to the year 500 A.D. Events, institutions, 

and ideas that have shaped the Western tradition. The political, social, 

economic, and cultural problems that caused the decline of these 

civilizations. 



Lie ^07 Colonial and Early Latin America. 
li-^ '■*\J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112, 211-212. 

European and Indian origins, the formation of a colonial society and 
culture in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the background 
and course of anti-colonial upheaval in the early nineteenth century, 
the problems from the post-independence period to 1890. 



|_IC OQC^ Europe in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth 
■■'^ 0^0 Centuries. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The cultural, political, and economic life of Europe from triumphant 
Classicism to the French Revolution. The Enlightenment: Prelude to 
Revolution and the Napoleonic Period. 

LJO '300 History of Russia. 
n;3 OOV-» Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112. - 

From the thirteenth century, with particular emphasis on the transi- 
tion from an agrarian to an industrial society in the period since the 
emancipation of the serfs in 1861. The role of the U.S.S.R. in world 
affairs since the Revolution of 1917; its impact upon Asia and the 
West. 



I_|C /\C\CK The History of Modern Latin America. 
n^^ *+^-»C^ credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: HS 111-112, 211-212. 

Latin America since 1890, including the distinctive histories of the 
major nations of Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Chile as v^ell as the 
characteristics, problems, and prospects of the area as a whole. inter- 
American relations and current revolutionary movements. 

i_iO AC\Ok Modern Chinese History. 
r"*^ **V-'C7 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The traditional society as it existed prior to the Opium War, China's 
confrontation with the West and its effect on political, intellectual, and 
economic developments. The formation and evolution of the present 
Chinese regime. 



LJO OOC Modern European Intellectual Thought. 
n^:? 0«_>0 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A history of the intellectual, political, scientific and social thought from 
the Renaissance to modern times. Special emphasis will be placed on 
those ideologies that have shaped and influenced the modern world. 



HS 351 -358 



Selected Studies in History. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Special topics in History dealing with the modern world. A study in 
depth of vital historical issues. 



|_IC ^01 Europe in the Twentieth Century. 
'•'^ *-*V-f I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The history of Western and Central Europe since World War I viewed 
from the perspective of Europe's rapidly changing role in world his- 
tory. Europe's political, social, and economic adjustment to the Russian 
Revolution and Nazism, the emergence of America and Russia as super- 
powers, and the loss of overseas possessions. 

|_JC A.C\P^ Modern Japanese History. 
''*-^ '-r\J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The institutional and cultural traditions of lapan, the nature of 
lapan's feudal society after 1600, and the interplay of indigenous and 
foreign elements in the changes which affected thought, politics, and 
society. After the coming of Perry, the adoption and reflection of 
parliamentary government and the reforms that followed World War II. 



|_IC ^1 /^ A History of the Middle East. 
••^ ^' ' ^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The rise and spread of Islam and the development of an Arabic civili- 
zation. Primary attention on Turkey, Egypt, and Iran, the problems 
created by the Western impact on the peoples and governments of the 
area, the effect of the Zionist movement on Middle East politics. 

LjC ^1 *3 A History of Africa in Modern Times. 
••'^ ^ ' ^-^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya, stressing the institutional histories 
of these countries, which enabled them ultimately to expel European 
imperialism. The second part of the course deals with nineteenth- 
century Africa, the partition of Sub-Sahara Africa by the European 
powers, the period of colonial domination, and the emergence of the 
independent states after 1945. 

Lie ^1 C Historiography. 

n*^ ^ ' ^-^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of schools of historical thought and interpretation 
from Thucydides to Toynbee, 



HS416 



Senior Seminar. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Required of all liberal arts students majoring in History, in the last 
semester of their senior year. The undertaking of an independent 
study and research project presented in an oral and written form. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



91 



LJC C^QQ Independent Study. 
ti^ *J^<^ Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 



HM 1 fifi Touristic Geography. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: HM 165. 

A course examining the development of the touristic areas of every 
major travel destination. To what areas are travelers journeying and 
what developments are taking place on a world wide basis to attract 
an increasing number of tourists, whether individuals, pleasure groups 
or business conventions. 



HM201 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT ADMINISTRATION 

Howard Fidler, Chairman 



I— IM 1 01 '•^*^ "' Inn-Keeping. 
niVI I \>-/ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BAlOl or Instructor's permission. 
Historical development of the common inn. The peculiarities of the 
inn-keeper-guest relationship are stressed. Responsibility of inn-keeper 
and use of inn-keeper's lien is emphasized. 



UlVyi 1 r^'5 Principles of Hotel Management. 
niVl I V-fO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: None. 

Introduces the student to hotel and restaurant operations. History of 
the industry with special emphasis on current trends. Various opera- 
tions within the industry are analyzed. 



LJ KJl 1 U^f\ Management Decision Making. 
n IVI I \J\J (Production Management). 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

Presents the current methods and principles of food production as 
practiced by the food service industry. Quality control, portion and cost 
control, menu planning are emphasized. 



Front Office Administration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

To make the student aware of the work flow connected with front 
office procedures. The preparation of the Night Audit is stressed. The 
student is introduced to the Art of Inn-Keeping. 



HM302 



Purchasing and Control. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

Introduction to the purchasing, receiving and issuing of food and 

beverages. The identification of grades and specifications determining 

quality of purchased items is emphasized. Cost control procedures are 

stressed. 



LiRyi OOC^ Food and Beverage Control. 
niVl O^iP Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: None. 

Current methods and principles of food and beverage storage, service, 
merchandising, issuing, as practiced by the hospitality industry. Phases 
covered on a rotating basis include menu planning, employee training, 
advertising and promotion, wine-cellar operation, music and entertain- 
ment, pre-cost procedures, payroll analysis. 



HM322 



Markets and Promotion of Public Services. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105. 

Aspects of the services market with emphasis on consumer behavior. 
Internal and external stimulation of sales in competitive and non- 
competitive markets, and the vagaries of environmental concept. Ex- 
perimental techniques embodied in industry sponsored sales-blitz 
activities. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: None, 

Introduces to the student the numerous aspects of tourism as related 
to the hotel-motel industry. Foreign and domestic tourism and business 
travel are all reviewed. 



HM410 



Hotel Systems and Operations. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

Analysis and evaluation of hotel systems and operations. Emphasis on 
analytical techniques, systems, computer-assisted operations, and 
change-induced problems. 



92 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



HIV1411 



Equipment, Layout, and Design. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: None. 

The concept of building management Is presented as demonstrating the 
Interdependence of planning, construction, equipment, maintenance, 
personnel and on-premlse customer. Develop layout studies, design 
equipment, estimate budget. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Francis J. Costello, Chairman 



IP* 1 09 Introduction to Computers: FORTRAN. 
^ ' vy^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 109 or Equivalent. 

An Introductory course in computers and FORTRAN for the Engineering 
and science students. The concept of stored program computers is 
developed, and the student is taught the basics of the FORTRAN 
language. The role of problem analysis, program analysis, and program- 
ming techniques are presented. Several problems are programmed and 
debugged by the student and run on the campus computer facility. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



IP" 1 /^O Introduction to Computer Concepts. 
*— ' V-'w Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: None 

Introduction to addressable memory and stored program concepts. 
Algorithms and flov» charting of various problems. Binary/hexadecimal/ 
decimal relationships included. 



I F" 1 O^ Computer Systems Design. 



Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 103. 

Introduction to computer based systems design. Linking of subsystems 
that are mutually interrelated and interdependent. Development of 
data files and data banks. 



ip- 1 O^ Introduction to Computers; COBOL. 
'^" ' V-'*-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; M 109 or Equivalent. 

An Introductory course in the application of the computer to the 
needs of today's society for the business, social science, and art 
students. Student use of data processing facilities of the campus 
computer center, problem solving, logic theory, and the understanding 
of software packages are put into practice. Student learns how to 
develop flow charts and writes and debugs programs in COBOL. 

Laboratory Fee; $3.00. 



IP" 1 /^£^ Safety Organization and Management. 
'*— • '-'^-' Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; Pill. 

History and development of safety movement, nature and extent of 
problem, development workmen's compensation, development of safety 
program, cost analysis techniques, locating and defining accident 
sources, analysis of the human element, employee training, medical 
service and facilities, and the what and how of the Occupational Safety 
and Health Act. 

I p" 1 1 Q Industrial Safety and Hygiene. 
'^' ' ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 214 or BA 125. 

A basic course in industrial accident prevention and industrial hygiene, 
covering; managerial accident prevention functions and responsibil- 
ities; injury data development, usage, and validity; machine guarding 
techniques and guard development, including point-of-operation drives; 
personal protective equipment; fire prevention and control, including 
flammable solvents, dusts, and their characteristics; electrical hazards, 
hand tools, power and manual; employee training; communications; 
hazard analysis; accident investigation. Industrial hygiene problems 
caused by solvents, dusts, noise, radiation are studied, as well as 
regulatory bodies, laws, and catastrophe hazards. 



IE201 



Accident Conditions and Controls. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; IE 106. 

Mechanical hazards, machine and equipment guarding, boilers and 
pressure vessels, structural hazards, materials handling hazards and 
equipment use, electrical hazards, personal protective equipment. 

IP" ^r\A Engineering Economics. 
'^- ^'^'+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 116 or M 117. 

A quantitative analysis of applied economics in engineering practice; 
the economy study for comparing alternatives; Interest formulae; 
quantitative methods of comparing alternatives; intangible considera- 
tions; selection and replacement economy for machines and struc- 
tures; break-even and minimum cost points; depreciation; relationship 
of accounting to the economy study; review of current industrial 
practices. Promotes logical decisions through the consideration of 
alternative courses of action. 

I P" O 1 ^ Management Theory. 
'^" ^ ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Status. 

Provides insight into the elements of the managerial process and 
develops a rational synthesis of the mass of detail comprising the 
subject matter of management. Focusing largely upon the complex 
problems of top and middle-level management, this course Investigates 
what managers do under given circumstances, yet stresses the on- 
going activities of management as part of an integrated, continuous 
process. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



93 



|Cr 01 £^ Elements of Industrial Hygiene. 
iC- ^ t ^~f Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 106, PH 103-104, CH 103. 

Analysis of toxic substances and their effect on the human body, 
analysis and effect of chemical hazards, physical hazards of electro- 
magnetic and ionizing radiation, abnormal temperature and pressure, 
noise, ultrasonic and low frequency vibration: sampling techniques in- 
cluding detector tubes, particulate sampling, noise measurement, and 
radiation detection: Governmental and Industrial Hygiene Standard 
Codes. 

Laboratory Fee: $5 00. 

I p" O 1 "TT Industrial Safety Auxiliary Functions. 
' ^ ^ ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 106, IE 201. 

Fire prevention and control, building design and construction; pollu- 
tion problems, waste disposal and pollution control; emergency and 
disaster control, communications and security, traffic safety engi- 
neering. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 214 or BA 125. 

Provides a foundation in fundamental concepts and a general knowl- 
edge of techniques in the administration of personnel relations. The 
nature of personnel administration, the handling of personnel prob- 
lems, employee attitudes and morale. Techniques of personnel admin- 
istration: recruitment, interviews, placement, training, employee rating, 
as well as wage policies and administration. In order to secure breadth 
and depth in the approach to personnel problems, simple case studies 
are used at appropriate points throughout the course. 

Ip- pp^ Advanced FORTRAN Programming. 
' *-■ ^^■'+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102 and M 115. 

Introduces the student to advanced FORTRAN programming and en- 
courages student utility of the campus computer facility and its 
peripheral devices. Various typical engineering and scientific computer 
applications are discussed and demonstrated. Problem solving inno- 
vations are presented. The last few weeks are devoted to an intro- 
duction of the business language, COBOL. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 

IP* PPCL Advanced COBOL Programming and introductory 
'^ ^^^ FORTRAN 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 105. 

Introduces the student to advanced techniques in programming and 

debugging programs written in COBOL for the campus computer. 

Various typical systems, analyses, and applications are discussed and 

demonstrated. The last few weeks are devoted to an introduction of 

writing and debugging problems written in the scientific language, 

FORTRAN. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



IP PPfi Numerical Analysis I. 
'^ ^^O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 118. 

Basic theories and techniques of numerical analysis, including relevant 
differential and integral calculus topics Solution of equation sets, 
numerical approaches to integration and differentiation, and introduc- 
tion to optimization theory. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 226. 

Introduction to linear algebra and engineering applications. Euclidean 
space and matrix methods, with emphasis on problem formulation and 
solution. Special topics include Eigen vectors, linear functions, and 
quadratic forms. 



IE 228 Introduction to FORTRAN IV. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 104. 

Introduction to FORTRAN IV, a scientific/engineering-oriented high-level 

computer language. Application to problems of a technical nature. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



ip- PPQ Advanced FORTRAN IV. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 226, IE 228. 

Emphasis on advanced techniques in FORTRAN IV including specification 
statements, subscripted variables and subprograms. Peripheral devices 
are introduced. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



ip- pO/^ Introduction to COBOL. 
'^- ^i*-''^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; IE 103, IE 104. 

Introduction to ANS COBOL, a business-oriented high-level computer 

language. Application to problems of a business nature. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



ip- poo Cost Control. 

'^- ^»J*3 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 115. 

Basic analysis of cost control techniques. Designed to give members 
of the management team the underlying rudiments of cost control 
systems they will be using and by which they will be measured and 
controlled. Theory of standard costs, flexible budgeting, and overhead 
handling techniques emphasized by analytical problem solution. 



94 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



IF7 OO^ Production Control. 
■^ ^♦J*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 214 or BA 125; and M 115. 

The basic principles that govern production control in an industrial 
plant. These principles are worked out in the problems of procuring 
and controlling materials, in planning, routing, scheduling, and dis- 
patching. Familiarizes the student with present and new methods used 
in this field, including 0. R. techniques. 



|C7 OO^ Simulations and Applications. 
'^- *^*-^*-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 229, IE 331, IE 227, IE 347, IE 346, IE 502. 
Evaluation of mathematical modeling of a system (business or scien- 
tific/engineering-oriented) geared towards program simulation. Canned 
simulation programs (e.g.; Business Games, GASP, GPSS) will be 
evaluated and run. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 115. 

An introductory course in Motion Analysis, Methods Analysis, and Work 
Measurement. Motion and Methods Analysis techniques include the 
Principles of Motion Economy, Process Analysis charting. Operations 
Analysis, Activity Analysis, and Work Design Layout Analysis. Students 
are required to design a work place project which will be filmed on 
CCTV for analysis. 

Work measurement includes an introduction to Time Study funda- 
mentals and Pre-Determined Time Systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



IP" '^'Q/^ Industrial Automation. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102, EE 224 or EE336, ME 204. 
Develops the fundamental principles of automatiofl, what automation 
is, and how it is implemented in typical mechaaical and processing 
industries. Topics covered include single loop design, high traffic 
design, and competitive level design techniques. Tools for automation 
include: computers, feedback control, simulation, and digital and 
analog logic. 

IP" 00 1 Advanced COBOt. 

'*— •-'*-' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 230. 

Emphasis on advanced techniques in ANS COBOL including table usage 

and peripheral memory devices such as disks, etc. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



IE 332 PL/landRPG. 



Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 228, IE 230. 

Development of the use of PL/1 a combination business-oriented and 
scientific/engineering-oriented high-level computer language; and 
RPG, a report generating special language useful to the generation of 
multi-styled reports. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 335. 

Hands on computer operation of programs written by the student. Use 
of all I/O devices will be included along with description of disk 
monitoring system control. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 243. 

A course extending the principles introduced in the prerequisite course 
including the development of Standard Data Systems, formula con- 
struction in standard data, Methods-Time-Measurement and Master 
Standard Data predetermined time systems. Work Sampling, Standards 
on Indirect Work, Wage Payment Plans, and the use of Closed Circuit 
TV as a Methods training tool. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 203. 

Provides an introduction to the application of statistical techniques to 
industrial and engineering problems, probability and distribution 
theory, measures of central tendency and dispersion in relation to 
population and samples, as well as applications of algebraic methods 
in industrial practice, including advanced statistical methods. 



|P"0^"7 ProbabiMty Analysis. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 216 or IE 346. 

Develops the theory of probability and related applications. Introduces 
such relevant areas as: combinations and permutations, probability 
space, laws of large numbers, random variables, conditional probabil- 
ity, Bayes' Theory, Markov chains, and stochastic processes. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequsites: IE 228, IE 230. 

Description of the functional characteristics of a computer main stor- 
age and peripheral unit structure along with the monitoring system 
control function via the use of the Assembler Language. 

Laboratory Fee: $3.00. 



|t7 A,C\^ Numerical Controls and Methods. 
"'— *+'-'^' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 102, ME 124, M 204. 

Involves the development and evaluation of methods for computing 
required numerical results from given numerical data specifically 
oriented toward numerical controlled machines. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



95 



IP" ^Ofi Quality Control. 

'^^ *+*J^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 346. 

Economics of quality control; modern methods used by industry to 
actiieve quality of product; preventing defects; organizing for quality; 
locating chronic sources of trouble; coordinating specifications, manu- 
facturing, and inspection; measuring process capability, using inspec- 
tion data to regulate manufacturing processes; control charts; selection 
of modern sampling plans. 

IP" AA/Zi Facilities Planning. 
"~ *+*+0 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 243, IE 204. 

Factors in plant location, design, and layout of equipment. The basic 

principles of obtaining mformation essential for carrying out such 

investigations. Survey of such practices as material handling, storage 

and storeroom maintenance, and use of service departments in modern 

factories. 

Laboratory Fee: $8.00. 

IP C?0^ Operations Research. 
'*— *J^<J^- Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Preiequisite: BA 216 or IE 346. 

The Operations Research area is oriented to various mathematical and 
near-mathematical methods for getting answers to certain kinds of 
business problems. Simulation including Monte Carlo, queuing, the 
Flood method for assigning jobs, the transportation method, and linear 
programming including the simplex method with both algebraic solu- 
tion and tableaus. 



Credit, 3 or 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Senior I.E. status. 

Advanced laboratory testing and special problems. The student works 
on problems of his own selection which have been outlined by him 
and have received approval. They may be in the form of a semester 
thesis or a series of original experiments, 

IP f^07 Systems Analysis (General). 
' *^ OV-' / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Junior status required. 

Presents the analytical and conceptual techniques upon which sys- 
tems analysis and development is based, and applications to non- 
business as well as business operations. Development of case studies 
and their applications independently oriented to the student's major 
area of interest. 

IP C^OA Systems Analysis (Business and Engineering). 
'^- ■^^v-'*-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 214 or BA 125, and M 115. 

Presents the analytical and conceptual techniques upon which systems 
analysis and development is based, and applications to business and 
industrial fields. Development of case studies and their applications 
independently oriented to the student's major area of interest. 



IP CI PI Business Games: 
C- >J i^<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 214 or BA 125; and BA 216 or IE 346. 
The Business Games area gives the student the opportunity of corre- 
lating his entire course of study in a management simulation frame- 
work. These training games make use of simulation models that 
explore specific management areas in depth. Operations research 
techniques of scientific management are developed. The purposes of 
these games are as follows: (1) to serve as a framework for training 
sessions in basic management principles; (2) to serve as an introduc- 
tion to the problem of manufacturing management; (3) to serve as a 
focal point for management development discussion of long-range plan- 
ning and decision assisting tools; (4) to show the student the use of 
modern electronic computer methods. 



JOURNALISM 

Douglas Robillard, Dean, Arts and Sciences 



J lOl 



Journalism I. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of journalism designed to acquaint students with the profes- 
sion. The American newspaper as a social institution and a medium 
of communication. The reporting of public affairs and elementary 
editing. 



J 102 



Journalism II. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: J 101. 

The basic principles of journalism and the organizational patterns of 
the mass media. The gathering of journalistic stories and the writing 
of general, simple, complex, and feature stories. 



J^OI "^^^ Writing and Reporting. 
^•^^J ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: J 101, E 113. 

The elements of news, the style and the structure of news stories, 
news gathering methods, copyreading, and editing. Practical experience 
in reporting, writing, and editing. 



I op) 1 Advanced Journalism and Feature Writing. 
*^ ♦-''-' I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: J 201. 

Theory of copyreading, editing, feature writing, headline writing, and 

reporting. Practical problems. 



96 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



MATHEMATICS Bruce W. Tyndall, Chairman 



All prerequisites for the following mathematics courses must be 
strictly observed unless waived by permission of the Mathematics 
Department. 

KM r\(^ 1 Mathematics Review I. 

IVI \j\j I fjp credit. Meets 3 hours per week. 

Required of both day and evening students who do not show sufficient 
understanding of mathematics fundamentals, as determined by entrance 
examinations. Natural numbers, integers, rationals and irrationals, 
properties and operations in each, construction and solution of mathe- 
matical models using simple equations, and percentages. 

Ml /^C Introductory College Mathematics. 
' '-'^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introductory college mathematics for the liberal arts student that in- 
cludes a variety of mathematical Ideas chosen to illustrate the nature 
and importance of mathematics in human culture. An inductive approach 
based on experimentation and discovery. 

KA 1 OQ Elementary College Algebra. 
lYI I \J^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A review of the fundamental operations and an extensive study of 
functions, exponents, radicals, linear, and quadratic equations. Addi- 
tional topics include ratio, proportion, variation, progressions, and the 
binomial theorem 

Ml 1 E Mathematical Analysis I. 
• • *^ Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 109. 

Designed to offer the foundation needed for the study of calculus. 
Polynomials, algebraic functions, elementary point geometry, plane 
analytic trigonometry, and properties of exponential functions. 

KA 11^ Mathematical Analysis II. 
lYI I I \J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 115. 

An Intuitive approach to topics in functions, analytic geometry, differ- 
ential and integral calculus, and probability. Designed for an insight 
into, and appreciation of, the methods of analysis. 



M 117 



M 115/117 



Calculus I. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 109. 

A one-semester course meeting six hours per week, which includes 

topics from M 115 and M 117. 



Calculus I. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 115. 

The first-year college course for majors in mathematics, science, and 
engineering; and the basic prerequisite for all advanced mathematics. 
Introduces differential and integral calculus of functions of one vari- 
able, along with plane analytic geometry. 



M 118 



Calculus II. 

Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 117. 

Continuation of first-year calculus, including methods of integration, 
the fundamental integration theorem, differentiation and integration of 
transcendental functions, and varied apolications. 



I\4 1 ? 1 Algebraic Structures I. 

'"' ' ^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A first course in and an orientation to abstract mathematics: ele- 
mentary logic, sets, mappings, relations, operations, elementary group 
theory. Open to all freshmen and sophomores 



1\A 1 ^^ Algebraic Structures II. 
'"• ' ^"^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 121. 

A continuation of M 121 including an introduction to groups, rings, 

fields, and the real and complex number systems. 



M 127 



Finite Mathematics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Basic discrete functions with numerous applications in the social 
sciences, elementary finite differences; topics from probability, 
matrices, and introduction to linear programming. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: one previous course in college mathematics. 
Includes basic probability theory, random variables and their distri- 
butions, estimation and hypothesis testing, regression and correla- 
tion. Will emphasize an applied approach to statistical theory with 
applications chosen from many different fields of study. 



Ml 07 Calculus Topics. 
' *^ -^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission. 

The theoretical material of the standard first year of calculus, includ- 
ing limits, chain rules, mean value theorems, and a discussion of the 
fundamental theorem of integral calculus. Upon successful completion, 
the student is qualified for M 203. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



97 



KM O/^O Calculus III. 



Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 118. 

The calculus of multiple variables, covering third dimensional topics 
in analytics, linear algebra, and vector analysis, plus partial differentia- 
tion, multiple integration, infinite series, and indeterminate forms. 

Mo/~v^ Differential Equations. 
^^^J** Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 203. 

The solution of ordinary differential equations, including the use of 
Laplace transforms. Existence of solutions, series solutions, matrix 
methods, non-linear equations, and varied applications. 

MOO 1 Linear Algebra. 
^*^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 203. 

Linear spaces and systems, matrices, linear transformations, quadratic 

forms, eigenspaces, and other topics. 



MO/^Q Advanced Differential Equations. 
*-'^-'^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 204. 

Theoretical analysis and applications of nonlinear differential equations. 
Phase plane and space, perturbation theory and techniques, series and 
related methods, stability theory and techniques, and relaxation phe- 
nomena. 

MOO 1 Modern Algebra I. 

*^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 121 and M 231. 

Groups, rings, integral domains, fields, polynomials. 

MO OK Number Theory. 
•^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 121. 

Topics are selected from the following: mathematical induction, 
Euclidean algorithm, integers, number theoretic functions, Euler-Fermat 
theorems, congruence, quadratic residues, and Peano axioms. 



MO/~j 1 Linear Analysis. 
*-''-' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 204 and M 231. 

Linear vector spaces, infinite series, transformations, generalized 

Fourier series, solutions of partial differential equations. 

MO/^O Advanced Calculus I. 
*^^»-' Credit, 3 semester hours. (EE Emphasis) 

Prerequisite: M 204. 

A survey course in applied mathematics. Vector Calculus: line and 
surface integrals, integral theorems of Green and Stokes, and the 
divergence theorem. Complex variables: elementary functions, Cauchy- 
Riemann equations, integration, Cauchy integral theorem, infinite 
series, calculus of residues, and conformai mapping. An introduction 
to Cartesian tensors. 



M 338-339 



Numerical Analysis I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 204 and IE 102. 

Approximation and error evaluation. Finite differences approximation 
by polynomial and orthogonal series, solutions of ordinary differential 
equations, solutions of elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic partial differ- 
ential equations, interpolation, and basic integral equation solutions. 



M341 



Sets and Drdered Structures. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 121. 

Axiomatic set theory based on the Zermelo-Fraenkel theory, algebra 
of sets, relations and functions, finite and infinite sets, order, axiom 
of choice and its equivalents. 



IWI *^r\A Advanced Calculus II. 

lYI t^yj*-* Credit, 3 semester hours. (ME Emphasis) 

Prerequisite: M 204. 

Topics from applied mathematics include: Fourier series, orthogonal 
functions, Bessel functions, Legendre polynomials, Laplace and Fourier 
transforms, product solutions of partial differential equations, and 
boundary value problems. 

MO/^C Series Solutions. 
->J\J*J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 204. 

Series solutions of ordinary differential equations, including the hyper- 
geometric type, Fourier analysis, introduction to perturbation methods, 
and successive approximation solutions of non-linear differential 
equations. 



MO /I O Projective Geometry. 
*-'^'*-* Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 121 and M 231. 

Projective transformations, fixed points, invariants, cross-ratio, conies, 

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 204 and M231. 

The properties of vectors and tensors in Cartesian and in general 
curvilinear coordinate systems. Topics covered include: invariance 
properties, transformation laws, calculus of tensors, covariant differ- 
entiation, surface theory. Applications are considered in areas such as 
rigid body dynamics, elasticity, fluid mechanics, electricity and mag- 
netism, and geometry. 



98 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



M371 



Probability Theory. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 203. 

Axiomatic study of probability: sample spaces, combinatorial analysis, 
independence and dependence, random variables, distribution functions, 
moment generating functions, central limit theorem. 



M^Q 1 Departmental Seminar. 
*+^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Independent study of some topic or topics approved by the Chairman 
of the department. This work is done under the supervision of a faculty 
member. A paper and/or a seminar talk may be required. 



MOQ1 Real Analysis I. 
^^J ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 121 and M 203. 

Foundations of analysis: sets and functions, real and complex number 
systems-, limits, convergence and continuity, sequences and infinite 
series, differentiation. 

MA\^ Real Analysis II. 
*+ I ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 381. 

Continuation of M 381 including Riemann-Stieltjes integration theory 

and an introduction to measure theory and the Lebesgue integral. 

M^-po Modern Algebra II. 
^■^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 321. 

Continuation of M 321 including topics such as: vector spaces, modules, 

commutative ring theory, Galois theory. 

M^oo Complex Variables. 
^■^*^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 381. 

For mathematics, science, and engineering students. 
Review of elementary functions and Euler forms; plus holomorphic 
functions, Laurent series, singularities, calculus of residues, contour 
integration, maximum modulus theorem, bilinear and inverse trans- 
formations, conformal mapping, and analytic continuation. 



MA A 1 Topology. 
^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 381. 

Topics selected from the following: Hausdorff neighborhood relations, 
derived, open and closed sets, closure, topological space, bases, 
homeomorphisms, relative topology, product spaces, separation axioms, 
metric spaces, connectedness and compactness. 

KM A~J^ Mathematical Statistics. 
'"' *-r / ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 371. 

Elements of the theory of point estimation, maximum likelihood esti- 
mates, theory of testing hypotheses, power of a test, confidence, inter- 
vals, linear regression, experimental design and analysis of variance, 
correlation, and non-parametric tests. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

ConstantineC. Lambrakis, Chairman 



MC" 1 01 Engineering Graphics. 

C \\J \ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to the principles and techniques of graphical com- 
munication. Fundamentals of orthographic projections; sections; applied 
geometry; auxiliary views; analysis of point, line, and plane relation- 
ships; detail and assembly drawing of simple machine parts. 

MC" ^ r\^ Engineering Drawing and Design, 
d I \J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 101. 

For technical students and draftsmen, covering layout of assembly 
drawings; detailing of their parts, properly dimensioned, for inter- 
changeable manufacture; use of A S A tables of metal fits for machine 
parts; use of threads and fasteners with the use of tolerances and 
limits. 



ME 124 



Mechanical Processes. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Mill and manufacturing processes. The casting of metals, pattern 
making, and mold preparing. Fabricating, metal cutting, and welding. 
Demonstrations, laboratory, and inspection trips to local manufacturing 
plants. 

MP" Or\A. Dynamics, 
t" ^i^-'*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CE 201, and M 118 or M 137 (M 118 or M 137 may be 
taken concurrently). 

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with emphasis 
on two-dimensional problems. Vector representation of motion in 
rectangular, polar, and natural coordinates. Impulse-momentum and 
work-energy theorems. Rigid bodies in translation, rotation and general 
plane motion. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



99 



Mr7 o/^ 1 Thermodynamics I. 
C. OW I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 118 or M 137. 

Classical thermodynamics treatment of first and second laws. Thermal 
and caloric equations of state. Closed and open systems, and steady 
flow processes. Absolute temperature, entropy, combined first and 
second laws. Introduction to statistical thermodynamics; particle 
distributions, statistical concept of entropy, and relation to macro- 
scopic properties. 

MC" *a<^Q Thermodynamics II. 
^ O*^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 301, and M 203 or ME 303 (M 203 or ME 303 may 
be taken concurrently). 

Extensions and applications of first and second laws: availability, com- 
bustion processes, phase and chemical equilibrium, ideal gas mixtures. 
Maxwell's relations. Steam power and refrigeration cycles. Internal 
combustion engine and gas turbine cycles. Irreversible thermodynamics. 



ME 321 



ME303 



Principles of Engineering Analysis. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 118 or M 137, and ME 204 (ME 204 may be taken 

concurrently). 

The formulation and solution of problems arising in the following 

areas: dynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, structural mechanics, 

mechanical vibrations, and electrical circuits. 



ME 311 



Machine Elements. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 202. 

Analysis and design of machine elements to meet specified operating 

conditions. Stresses, deformations, and other factors in design of 

machine parts. Application to machine elements such as joints, shafts, 

gears, couplings, brakes, clutches, and flexible power-transmitting 

elements. 

MP" O 1 O Mechanical Design. 
^ *-' ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CE 307 or instructor's consent. 

Continuation of Machine Elements. Design projects selected individual- 
ly developed by the student. 

MET O 1 C Mechanical Engineering Laboratory No. 1. 
*— <J I ^ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CE 202, ME 204, and ME 303 (ME 303 may be taken 
concurrently). 

Students conduct selected tests in the fields of mechanics of materials 
and vibrations. Emphasis placed on organization of the experiment, 
measurement techniques, sources of error, and organization of the 
report. Students are required to design, conduct, and present one ex- 
periment of their own. 

Note: Part-time students are charged for a standard 3 semester hour 
course. 



Fluid Mechanics. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 204, and M 203 or ME 303. 

Fluid kinematics: continuity equation, vector operations. Momentum 
equation for frictionless flow: Bernoulli equation with applications. 
Irrotational flow: velocity potential, Laplace's equation, dynamic pres- 
sure and lift. Stream function for incompressible flows. Rotational 
flows: vorticity, circulation, lift, and drag. Integral momentum analysis. 
Navier Stokes equation: stress tensor, Newtonian fluid. Boundary layer 
approximations. 



KAp" OOO Introduction to Gas Dynamics. 
IVIC O^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 302 and ME 321 (ME 321 may be taken concurrently). 
Compressible fluid flow with emphasis on one-dimensional ducted 
steady flows with heat transfer, frictional effects, shock waves, and 
combined effects. Introductory considerations of two and three 
dimensional flows. Occasional demonstrations will accompany the 
lectures. 



Mpr OOC Tool Design 
C >J>J^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CE 201 and ME 124 (ME 124 may be taken concurrently). 
Basic techniques of tool design, methods, analysis, drill jig design, 
tolerances and allowances, cutting tools, die design, gauges, and 
fixtures. 



MP" *5Q^ Tool Engineering. 
C -J-J^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 335 or Instructor's Consent. 

A continuation of ME 335 with emphasis on economics, estimating, and 
process planning. Students design projects requiring the complete plan- 
ning and designing necessary to manufacture machine parts. 



ME 343 



Mechanisms. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 204. 

Graphical and analytical methods for determining displacements, 
velocities, and accelerations of machine components. Application to 
simple mechanisms such as linkages, cams, gears. 



ME 344 



Mechanics of Vibration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 204 and ME 303. 

The mathematical relationships necessary for the solution of problems 
involving the vibration of lumped and continuous systems; damping; 
free and forced motion; resonance; isolation; energy methods; bal- 
ancing; single, two and multiple degrees of freedom; vibration measure- 
ment. 



100 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



ME401 



Mechanical Systems Analysis. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 303. 

Dynamical systems and their characteristics. Analogy of electrical, 
mechanical, and other systems. Mixed systems — Dimensional Analysis — 
Design considerations. 



MP" Ar\*^ Introduction to Flight Propulsion. 
^ *+WO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 322 and Instructor's consent. 
A senior course designed for those students who intend to work or 
pursue further studies in the aerospace field. Among the topics covered 
are: Detonation and deflagration, introductory one-dimensional non- 
steady gas flows, basic concepts of turbo-machinery, and survey of the 
contemporary propulsive devices. Shock tubes, supersonic wind tunnel, 
and flame propagation demonstrations will accompany the lectures. 



Mp- Ar\A •^^'' 3nd Mass Transfer. 
^ *+W*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 321, and some knowledge of differential 
equations (ME 321 may be taken concurrently). 

Conduction in solids, solution of multi-dimensional conduction prob- 
lems, unsteady conduction, radiation, boundary layer, and convection. 
Introduction to mass transfer. The lectures will include occasional 
demonstrations of convection, radiation, heat exchangers. 



ME 51 2 



ME405 



Advanced Mechanical Design. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: ME 321. 

Selected and advanced topics related to the design of machine ele- 
ments such as hydrodynamic theory of lubrication and principles of 
hydraulic machines with application to hydraulic couplings. 



MP" /\('\Q Advanced Dynamics. 
C «4WO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 204, ME 303, and M 204. 

Plane and spatial motion of particles and rigid bodies, inertia tensor, 
relative motion, gyroscopes, central force motion, Lagrangian and 
Hamiltonian Methods. 

MP" ^1 C Mechanical Engineering Laboratory No. 2. 
^^ *-r I -^J Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: ME 302, ME 321, and ME 404. 

A survey of experiments and laboratory investigations covering the 

areas of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, and gas 

dynamics. 

Note: Part-time students are charged for a standard 3-semester-hour 

course. 



Senior Seminar. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Open to Seniors with Chairman's approval. 

An independent design, theoretical analysis, or laboratory investiga- 
tion as chosen by the student and approved by the Chairman of the 
department. The work is performed by the student with frequent 
critiques by the responsible faculty member. 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING 

Richard J. Greet, Coordinator 



RAT OOO Engineering Materials. SPRING TERM 

•▼' ' ^^<J^<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the properties of the principal engineering materials of 
modern technology: Steels and non-ferrous alloys and their heat 
treatment, concrete, wood, ceramics, and plastics. Gives engineers 
sufficient background to aid them in selecting materials and setting 
specifications. 



MT219 



Principles of Solids I FALL TERM 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 105. 

Introduction to the relationships between atomic structure and macro- 
scopic properties such as mechanical strength and ductility. Atomic 
bonding, crystallography, phase equilibrium and phase transforma- 
tions among topics considered. 



MT220 



Principles of Solids II SPRING TERM 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 209. 

Study of transport and rearrangement of charge to determine electric 
and magnetic properties of solids. Semiconductors, superconductors, 
and magnetic materials among topics considered. 

\j\-r 001 Welding Metallurgy. 
'▼' » OV-f I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 219. 

Study of welding and brazing procedures of ferrous and non-ferrous 

alloys, with consideration of macro and microstructures of welded 

members. 

R/i-T" Op|0 Polymeric Materials. 
I"' ' OV-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: CH 105. 

Chemistry and physical properties of rubber and plastic materials. 
Consideration of both fundamental principles and engineering appli- 
cations. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



101 



|V/|T O/^^ Mechanical Behavior of Materials. SPRING TERM 
'^' ■ »-?V-'*-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; MT 219. 

Detailed study of elastic and plastic deformation of materials at room 
temperature and elevated temperatures. Dislocation theory and micro- 
plasticity models considered. 

IV/I"T" OOQ Materials Laboratory: Metallography. 
ivi I »^\j^ Cedit, 11/2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT219. 

Laboratory preparation of both ferrous and non-ferrous samples for 
microscopic investigation, Including photomicroscopy with metallo- 
graph microscope. 



MT500 



Research Project. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: MT331, MT 342, plus senior status. 
An independent design, theoretical analysis, or laboratory Investiga- 
tion, chosen by the student and approved by the Chairman of the 
Department. The work is performed by the student with frequent 
critiques by a faculty member. 



MUSIC 

Ralf E. Carriuolo, Coordinator 



R/IT O 1 /^ Materials Laboratory: Heat Treatment. 
lYI I >^ t\J Credit, IV2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT219. 

Laboratory documentation of the effects of heat treatment m annealing 

and hardening both ferrous and non-ferrous materials. 

R^T" 00^ Nuclear Metallurgy. 

IVl I «3^^+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 219. 

Consideration of nuclear reactors, the production and fabrication of 
metals and alloys used as reactor components, non-destructive test- 
ing, and radiation damage of materials. 

N^-r 001 Non-ferrous Metallurgy. FAIL TERM 

*^* * *^*J I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT219. 

The physical metallurgy of aluminum, copper, magnesium, and other 
non-ferrous metals. Alloying, fabrication, and consideration of materials 
properties which make non-ferrous metals competitive with steels. 



MT342 



steels and Their Heat Treatment. FALL TERM 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 219. 

Fundamentals of ferrous physical metallurgy such as iron-carbon 
phase diagram, transformation diagrams, hardenability, and the effects 
of alloying elements. Heat treating discussed in terms of resulting 
microstructures and physical properties. 



MT400 



Materials Reactions. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 219. 

Consideration of chemical reactions in the liquid and solid state of 
importance to the field of materials engineering. Topics to include 
extractive metallurgy, internal oxidation, surface treatment, and 
recycling of secondary materials. 



MU 111 



Introduction to Music. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Some of the basic forms and styles of music in the Western World. 
Music Appreciation. 



MU 112 



Introduction to World Music. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Various non-Western musical styles, their cultures and aesthetics; 
music of the indigenous cultures of the Americas and the advanced 
musics of the Near East and Far East; emphasis on India, the Orient, 
Southeast Asia, Africa and Indonesia. 



MU 116 



Performance. 

Credit, 1-8 semester hours; maximum per 

semester, 1 credit. 

Open to all students interested in ensembles or private instruction. 
Students with adequate scholastic standing may carry this course for 
credit in addition to a normal program. 

ly^l I 1 C<^ Introduction to Music Theory. 
lYI KJ I ^W Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A basic introduction to the fundamentals of music: notation, physical 
and acoustical foundations, harmony and melody, modality, tonality, 
atonality; consonance and dissonance, tension; some introductory 
composition. 



MU 198-199 



Introduction to American Music. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Music of the North American continent from the Puritans to the 
present day; both European and non-European musical traditions, with 
emphasis on 20th century developments. 



102 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



MU201-202 



Analysis and History of European Art 

Music. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The growth of Western Art Music from its beginnings to the present 
day. Analysis of musical masterpieces on a technical and conceptual 
basis. 



I<Al i ^C5/^ OC^I Theory and Composition. 
lyiKJ ^iJ\J-^*J I Credit, 6 semester hours. 

investigation of music theory in various parts of the world, including 
the Western Art Tradition. Exercises in the composition of music with- 
in these theoretical constructs. Ear training and keyboard harmony. 



MU299 



Problems of Music. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The problem of music as an art form throughout the world. Music 
aesthetics and its relationship to the performing and composing of 
music. 



MU300 



studies in IVIusic I. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Area studies m music and its parent culture. Cultural theory as 
related to the music; instruments of the area and their etymologies; 
performance practices; the social role of music, both art and folk. 
Areas offered depending on availability of staff: China, Japan, the 
Near East, the Indian sub-continent, Africa, American Indian, Afro- 
American, Latin America, the Anglo-Celtic tradition, others. 



MU550 



studies in Urban Ethnic Music. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

An investigation of the music tradition of inner city ethnic groups; 
emphasis on the operation of the oral tradition in the preservation of 
cultural values and customs as evidenced through music. Classroom 
discussion will be balanced by field research in the urban vicinity. 



MU599 



independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 

maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and coordinator of depart- 
ment. 

Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



PHILOSOPHY 

John Collinson, Chairman 



MU350 



studies in Music II. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Area studies in musical forms: their history, evolution, and resultant 
metamorphoses, performance practices, and present day forms extant. 
Areas offered depending upon availability of staff. 



MU416 



Performance. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the departmental staff and a faculty 

advisor. 

Preparation and presentation of an instrumental or vocal performance 

illustrating sufficient proficiency to warrant the awarding of a degree 

in World Music. 



MU500 



Seminar in Advanced Research. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Bibliographical studies of major world music areas; investigation of 
current and historical musicological theories, analysis and criticism 
of musicological area literatures. 



PMI 111 Introduction to Problems of Philosophy. 

• '•L- ' ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Man's place in the universe, how we discover truth, the nature of 
beauty and the good, the basis of moral choices, etc. 

Pl-ll 11*^ History of Philosophy through the Renaissance. 
i^tii— i • *^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Chronological introduction to problems of philosophy. Pre-Socratics, 
Plato, Aristotle, Medieval and Renaissance philosophers. 

PHI 114 History of Modern Philosophy. 
liii— ■ I ** Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Chronological introduction to problems of philosophy. Seventeenth Cen- 
tury to the present, including Descartes, Hume, Hegel, Nietzsche, and 
contemporary philosophers. 

PI— II 1 ^^ '-"^ic and Scientific Method. 

• rll— • ^*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Introduces the student to deduction, warranted induction, and scien- 
tific description. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



103 



PHL213 



PHL 222 



Contemporary Issues in Philosophy. 
Credit, 3-6 semester hours. 

Content varies with the interest of the instructor and the students. 
Current philosophical thinking in such areas as natural science, social 
science, metaphysics, religion, aesthetics, theory of knowledge, lan- 
guage, existentialism, ethics, and positivism. 

Ethics in a Changing Society. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PHL 111 or 113. 

The major ethical systems in the framework of contemporary society. 
Ethical norms which point to goals of life and their relation to the 
issues in science, business, the professions, and other human activities. 

pU-ll ^P^ Symbolic Logic. 

r ni— ^.^.'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PHL 124 or M121. 

Formal deductive systems, including the prepositional calculus, the 
calculus of functions, independence of axioms, primitive symbols, inter- 
pretation, paradoxes, theory of types, Goedel's theorem. 

pi_l| ^ AC\ Philosophy of Science. 
~''^- ^'+'-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PHL 111. 

A study of the nature of scientific method, the logic of scientific ex- 
planation and theory construction, philosophical problems of selected 
sciences, and questions peculiar to the social sciences. 

P|_|| OC^O Philosophy of Religion. 
• rl^ ^♦JV-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PHL 111. 

An examination of some philosophical notions used in religious dis- 
course; meaning, truth, fact, being, logic, etc. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Donald Wynschenk, Coordinator of Physical 
Education 



PHL260-261 



Development of Jewish Thought. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The development of Jewish thinking and philosophy and the major 
issues and movements with which it has become involved. 



Physical Education (men). 

No credit, required for graduation. 

Fundamentals and skills of carry-over sports such as tennis, golf, 
volleyball, paddleball, handball, bowling, skating, swimming, sailing, 
skiing, Softball, badminton, and squash. Understanding and develop- 
ment of skills in spectator team sports such as basketball, soccer, 
touch football, and softball. Calisthenics and adaptive exercise program. 

Physical Education (women). 

No credit, required for graduation. 

Fundamentals and skills of carry-over sports such as tennis, golf, 
handball, bowling, sailing, tennis, skiing, skating, swimming, softball, 
badminton, and squash. Understanding and development of skills in 
spectator team sports such as baskeball, soccer, volleyball, and 
softball. Calisthenics and adaptive exercise. 

Personal Health. 
No credit. 

Required of all day freshmen who are exempt from PE 111-112 or 
PE 113-114 due to medical or physical reasons. Personal aspects of 
hygiene, the principles of healthful living. Mental health, venereal 
disease, reproduction and marriage, birth control, and the effects of 
drugs, alcohol, and tobacco on human behavior, and the value of sys- 
tematic exercise. 



PHYSICS Kee W. Chun, Chairman 



PE 111-112 



PE 113-114 



PE 221-222 



DLJI '3 Analysis and Criticism of the Arts. 
' '"— <J^-^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: At least 3 semester hours of Philosophy. 
The language used to talk about works of art. Form, content, expres- 
sion, values, the ontological status of the art object. 

pi-JI 5d3 Independent Study. 
'^*^"~' *-'^'^' Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisite: Consent of faculty member and dean of Arts and Sciences. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
bv the student. 



PH 103-104 



General Physics. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Cannot be taken for credit by students majoring in chemistry, physics, 
or engineering. 

Basic concepts of classical and modern physics, such as fundamental 
laws and phenomena of mechanics, electricity, magnetism, heat, and 
optics. Conservation principles, relativity and quantum theory, atomic, 
nuclear, and solid state physics, geophysics, astrophysics, biophysics, 
laser and lunar science. 



104 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



PH 105-106 



General Physics Laboratory. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

May be elected concurrently with PH 103-104. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 



PH 1 Oft Physics I w/Lab. 

' '* I *-»0 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 117 or Instructor's consent. 

Fundamental concepts and mathematical exposition, including calculus, 
mechanics, statics, kinematics, Newton's laws, work, energy, power, 
conservation of energy and momentum, rotational concepts, simple 
harmonic motion. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



pi_| 001 Techniques In Nuclear Physics. 
•^•^ ^i>-' I Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Two semesters of a laboratory science and Instructor's 

consent. 

The mstruments and methods of nuclear physics. Experiments may be 

completed In biology, chemistry, engineering, or physics, according to 

the interest of the student. 



P|_| ^01 Analytical Mechanics. 
' '• *-»'-' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 204, PH 108, or Instructor's consent. 
Intermediate analytical mechanics. Statics and dynamics of particles 
and rigid bodies with emphasis on the theory of motion under central 
forces and on the use of the generalized coordinates; introduction to 
an elementary Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism; small vibrations. 



PUI ^1 S> Nuclear Physics. 
t^fi»-Jt*J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or Instructor's consent. 

Elementary nuclear physics. Nuclear structure, natural radioactivity, 
induced radioactivity, nuclear forces, and reactions, fission and fusion, 
reactors, and topics of special interest. 



PH340 



Lasers. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 210 or Instructor's consent. 

Laser theory, construction and application to latest engineering and 

scientific uses. 



PH POQ Pliysics II w/Lab. 
't^ ^'\J^' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 108, M 118. 

Fundamental concepts and mathematical exposition, including calculus, 

electricity and magnetism, electrostatics, direct currents, magnetic 

effects of a current, electrical Instruments, ballistic galvanometer, 

induced E.M.F., inductance and capacitance, simple harmonic motion, 

physical basis for A.C. circuits, bridge measurement, potentiometer 

measurements. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



DLJ 'SC^I Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism. 
' *^ *^'^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 209 and M 204. 

Electric field, potential. Gauss Law, dipoles, Poisson, and Laplace 

equations, dielectric theory, steady magnetic fields, electromagnetic 

induction, magnetic properties of matter. Maxwell's equations, L-C-R 

circuits, A.C. circuit analysis, vacuum tube and transistor circuit 

theory. 



PH 21 O ''''i'5'" I" w/Lab. 

•^ ' " fci I vy Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 108 and M 118. 

Fundamental radiation topics include heat, sound, light; simple har- 
monic motion, generation of mathematical wave forms, wave propaga- 
tion, laser demonstration of optical principles, lens systems, theory 
of color, wave interference, gratings, prisms, filters, spectroscopy. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



DLJ 'SAI Modern Optics. 

» ri >ij\j 1 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 210. 

Solid state spectroscopy from the point of view of the research 
physicist and chemist. Modern optical devices including television 
pick-up tubes, electro- and injection-luminescent devices, image ampli- 
fiers, lasers and holography, fiber-optics, opto-electronics for com- 
puters. 



PH P 1 1 Physics IV. 

'^'' ^■' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 210 or PH 104. 

Modern physics fundamentals. Twentieth-century developments in 
physics. Special relativity, quantum theory of radiation, de Broglie 
waves, the Bohr atom, elementary wave mechanics, the solid state, 
crystal structure, semiconductors, and lasers. 



PU *^'7*^ Advanced Laboratory. 
'^*" *^-' *^ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211. 

Selected experiments in atomic and nuclear physics including nuclear 
radiation and decay, quantization of charge and light energy, and 
nuclear magnetic resonance. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



105 



PH400 



statistical Mechanics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

An introductory course in classical and quantum statistical mechanics. 
The canonical ensemble; Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi- 
Oirac statistics and their applications; statistical interpretation of 
thermodynamics; transport processes. 



pi_l KQQ Independent Study. 

't* vJJ^C? Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with a 
maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



PI— I ^01 Atoniic Physics. 

^t* «-^^-' I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211. 

Structure and interactions of atomic systems including Schrodinger's 
equation, atomic bonding, scattering and mean free path, radiative 
transitions, and laser theory. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Caroline A. Dinegar, Chairman 



PI— I ADA Senior Project. 

^** '-r\J'-f Credit, 0-6 semester hours. 

Open only to senior Physics Majors. Individual projects in experi- 
mental or theoretical physics to be carried out under direct super- 
vision of a faculty advisor. 

pLJ AOf^ Solid State Physics. 

' '■ *+^-'^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211. 

Elementary principles of the electrical and physical behavior of solids 
as applied to semiconductor, metallurgy, and magnetically activated 
solid state devices. 



PH451 



Elementary Quantum Mechanics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 211 or Instructor's consent. 

An elementary treatment of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. 
Schrodinger's equation with its applications to atomic and nuclear 
structure; collision theory; radiation; introductory perturbation theory. 

pi— I ^C^O Thermodynamics. 

'^'' '-r^J^i Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 108 and Instructor's consent. 
An introduction to thermodynamics and kinetic theory. Laws of ther- 
modynamics, entropy, application to simple physical and chemical 
systems; thermodynamic inequalities and equilibrium; phase transi- 
tions; properties of ideal gases; low temperature physics. 

P|_| A'yf) Theory of Relativity. 
t^i* '-' y ^<J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Instructor's consent. 

Introductory course on Einstein's theory of Relativity. Special theory of 

relativity including the Lorentz Transformation, Minkowsky geometry, 

relativistic mechanics, and electromagnetism. General theory of relativity 

including principle of equivalence, Einstein's theory of gravitation, 

graviton. 



PS 121 



American Government and Politics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The American Political System stressing the constitutional foundations, 
structures and functions of the national government, the electoral 
process, and interstate relationships. 



PS 122 



state and Local Government and Politics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The politics of state and local government in the United States. 
Emphasis on the problems of cities, revenue sharing, community power 
structures, welfare, public safety, the state political party, big-city 
political machines, interest groups, state legislatures, the governor, 
the mayor, courts and judicial reform. 

pc 1 fiA Political and Social Thought of the Third World. 
••^ I \-»*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as SO 124) 
(Formerly PS 124) 

The emergence of the Third World as a decisive force in world, 
political, social, economic, and cultural thought. 



PS201-202 



Women and the Political Process. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The political process in relation to the economic, social, cultural and 
psychological aspect of women. Structured to meet the contemporary 
social and political introspection concerning women in an egalitarian 
society. May be taken for one term and 3 credits as well as a full 
year for 6 credits. 

pC OO*^ American Political Thought. 
•^•-^ ^V-'O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

American political thought from colonial times to the present. Revo- 
lutionary models, party development, and federalist forces along with 
the philosophical foundations of states rights, the agrarian movement, 
social Darwinism, and the Black protest movement. 



106 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



pC O 1 f^ Urban Government and Politics. 
r O ^ I \J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The organizational and administrative government at the municipal 
level with special emphasis upon the problems of modern urban 
America in relation to social and political development. 

po ^^^ United States Foreign Policy. 
' ^ ^^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 
A quantitative and qualitative examination of the foreign policy 
process for the United States. The strategy and tactics of a super- 
power in the twentieth century and the determinants involved in the 
foreign policy and military policy areas. 



PS 241 



international Relations. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 221) 

Forces and structures operating at the international level in the 
modern nation state system: the foreign policy process and the 
decision-making process, the impact on traditional interstate behavior 
of the decolonization process, and the economic and political develop- 
ments since World War II. 



PS 243 



international Law and Organization. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 223) 

Prerequisite: PS 221. 

The traditional as well as modern approach to international law and 
organization; major emphasis on the contribution of law and organi- 
zation to the establishment of a world rule of law and world peace. 
The League of Nations system and the United Nations system are 
analyzed. 

pC Of^l Modern Political Analysis. (Formerly PS 120) 
' ^ ^w I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A basic introduction to the new approaches of modern political 
analysis. Personality and Politics, Political Socialization, Group 
Theory, Decision Making, Systems Analysis and Political Violence will 
be among the areas covered. 

pC OQ1 Comparative Political Systems: East Asia. 
~*^ ^C3 I Credit 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 110) 

The traditional and modern political and social structures of China, 
Japan and Korea as well as the functioning of the political system 
within each country. 

pC OQO Comparative Political Systems: Europe. 
• *^ ^CJ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The political characteristics of European nations. Emphasis will be 
given to governmental, political, social and economic institutions and 
structures as well as the impact of modern European developments 
on integration. (France, Germany, United Kingdom, USSR, Yugoslavia, 
Czechoslovakia, Sweden and Switzerland.) 



pC OQ'Q Comparative Political Systems: Latin America. 
~^ ^OO Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Political modernization and development in Latin America. Political 
institutions, national identity, leadership, integration, political sociali- 
zation, and political ideologies. 

pC OQ^ Comparative Political Systems: Africa. 
~*^ ^<J*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Emphasis is given to political institutions, political parties, and the 
transition from colonialism to nationhood. Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, 
and South Africa will be among the nations examined. 

pC OQC^ Comparative Political Systems: Middle East. 
' ^ ^OiJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Political, social and economic structures, the impact of the west, the 
emergence of national states, and the process of political develop- 
ment. Individual countries such as Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, 
Jordan, Iraq and Iran will be studied. 



PS304 



Political Parties. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PS 121. 

An historical and functional analysis of the American political party 
system, including a study of interest groups, public opinion, electoral 
behavior, political leadership, and modern proposals for the reorgani- 
zation of the existing party system. 

pC '^Oft Legislative Process. 

» ^ *^^-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PS 121. 

An analysis of the legislative process in the American political system. 
Stress will be placed on legislative functions, selection of legislative 
candidates, organization of Congress and State legislatures, legislative 
leadership, the committee system, the role of the lobbyists, legisla- 
tive voting behavior, and power. 

pC '30Q ^^^ American Presidency. 
r O O^w/i? Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The origins of the Presidency and a number of presidential models. 
The role of the President as Commander-in-Chief, legislative leader, 
party leader, administrator, manager of the economy, director of 
foreign policy, and advocate of social justice. The nature of Presi- 
dential decision making as well as the source of presidential authority, 
power, and influence. 



PS 332 



Constitutional Law. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 302) 

Prerequisite: PS 121. 

The principles and concepts of the United States Constitution as 
revealed in leading decisions of the Supreme Court through the 
process of judicial review. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



107 



pC '3^£2 Political Sociology. 
I^i3 <J\J^J Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as SO 318) 
(Formerly PS 3181 

Prerequisite-. SO 113. (Offered even years, spring semester.) 
Concepts, theories, and basic issues in the sociological analysis of 
political systems; social factors in political attitudes and behavior 
with emphasis on understanding the functional and dysfunctional 
aspects of socio-political coordination and conflict. 

po O^Q Public Opinion and Social Pressure. 
rO Ov3C7 Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as SO 418) 
(Formerly PS 418) 

Prerequisites: SO 113, P 111. 

An intensive analysis of the nature and development of public opinion 
with particular consideration of the roles, both actual and potential, 
of communication and influence. 



PSYCHOLOGY David Brown, Chairman 



PS390 



Political Modernization. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A comparative analysis. Political change and development. The process 
of political transition, political integration and nation-building. Institu- 
tional developments, including political parties, military elites, youth, 
intellectuals, the bureaucracy, economic development, and political 

culture. 



PS 461 



Political Theory, Ancient and Medieval. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 401) 

Prerequisite: HS 111. 

Western political thought from Plato to Sir Thomas More. Emphasis 
upon basic concepts and questions consistently raised by political 
theorists. Required for all Political Science majors. 

pC AfZ^ Political Theory, Modern and Contemporary. 
' *-' *+^-'^ Credit, 3 semester hours. (Formerly PS 402) 

Prerequisite: HS 112. 

A continuation of PS 401, the theories of selected writers from 

Thomas Hobbes to the present. Required for all Political Science 

majors. 



PS 499-500 



Senior Seminar in Political Science. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 
(Formerly PS 416417) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the department chairman. 
The construction and preparation of an individual research project in 
Political Science by the student and the presentation of that project 
in oral form within the seminar and in written form as the Seminar 
Thesis, Required of all Political Science majors. 

po C^QQ Independent Study. 
t-^ »JC7^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Directed research on special topics to be decided upon in consulta- 
tion with the Chairman of the Department. 



Pill Psychology. 
' ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Important principles of human behavior. Motivation, emotion, learning, 
personality, intelligence, etc. The utilization of psychological knowledge 
in relation to everyday human activities. 

Po 1 o Business and Industrial Psychology. 
^ ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Psychological principles and research findings pertinent to adminis- 
tration in business and industry. Contemporary research of behavior 
factors in managerial contexts. 

P9 1 ^ Developmental Psychology. 
^ I '^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Processes of development of the child, adolescent and adult, motiva- 
tion changes in interests, attitudes, and abilities, social and cultural 
influences. 

Poo/^ Consumer Behavior. 
^^^<-f Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Principles and methodology in studying consumer decisions and actions. 
Internal and external influences upon consumer behavior; decision pro- 
cesses; relationships between consumers and both private and public 
organizations. 

p 301 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of mathematics at the college level. 
Consideration of statistical concepts pertinent to the behavioral 
sciences. Application of statistical techniques to experimental design 
and research findings. Required of Psychology majors. 

PO/^K Research Design and Methods in Psychology I. 
•^^^^J Credit, 3 semester hours 

Prerequisites: P 111 and P 301. 

Methods of design and analysis in psychological research. Considera- 
tion of psychophysical methods, general variables, design problems, 
problems of inference. Required of Psychology majors. 



108 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



PO/~)fr Research Design and Methods in Psychology II. 
»J\J\j Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 305. 

Methods of design and analysis in perception, learning, motivation, 

concept-formation, etc. Group and individual research projects. 

p O 1 C Psychology of Learning. 
• *^ ' *-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111, 

Psychological principles underlying learning and teaching. Learning 

theories and their application to behavioral change. 

P *api Social Psychology. 
■^ *^^- ' Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as SO 320) 
Required of Psychology majors. 

Prerequisites: P 111 and SO 113. 

The interdependence of social organizations and behavior. The inter- 
relationships between role systems and personality; attitude analysis, 
development and modification; group interaction analysis; social con- 
formity; social class and human behavior. 

P OOf^ Abnormal Psychology. 
r^ >J>J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 111. 

Psychological and organic factors involved in personality disorgani- 
zation. The psychodynamics and classification of psychoses, neuroses, 
brain disorders, personality disorders, psychophysiological disorders, 
transient stress disorders, and mental retardation. 

P *3^1 Psychological Theory I. 
' *-^*-' I Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: P 305 and senior class status. 

The historical background of contemporary issues in modern psycho- 
logical schools. 



Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 341. 

Co.itinuation of Psychological Theory I. Emphasis placed on contemporary 
problems of psychology in the light of twentieth century developments 
in theory. 

P *3C^O Theory and Principles of Psychological Measurement. 
' ^^*^*-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Required of Psychology majors. 

Prerequisite: P 301. 

The bases for constructing and evaluating standardized tests in psycho- 
logical, educational, and industrial applications, 

p *3f^1 Physiological Psychology. 
' ^J'-' i Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Pill, and SC 121, 122 or 123. 

Endocrinological, neural, sensory, and response mechanisms involved in 

learning, motivation, adjustment, emotion, and sensation. 



P '3'70 Psychology of Personality. 
r <J 7 \J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P 216 and P 315. 

Major personality theories and their implications for understanding 

both normal and deviant personality developments. 

P C71QQ Independent Study. 
' '^^'^-' Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. The course must be initiated by 
the student. 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Joseph A. Parker, Chairman 



PA 101 



Fundamentals of Communications. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to the various media of public information, including 
newspapers, magazines,- radio, television, trade publications, public 
relations, and the film. 



PA 102 



Problems of Public Communications. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PA 101 or equivalent. 

An examination of such problems as influence of the media, aspects 
of social mteractions involving communications, value/beliefs, myths. 
Students will examine the kinds of writing involved with the media 
and begin to do some writing on their own. 

pA ^r\fS. Sound Workshop. 

• '^ ^iV^^J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Lectures, demonstration and lab practice. Concerned with sound as 
used in radio, television, and film. 



PA ^Oft ''^''''' Broadcasting. 

~ f^ £-\Jyj Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PA 206, 

Advanced radio production. The student writes scripts and coordinates 
with production for dramatic and non-dramatic presentation. Informal 
audience participation programming is included. 



COURSE DESCRIPTrONS 



109 



PA 210 



Film Production, Theory and Practice. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Stresses the understanding of communication ttirough film. Although 
whole class sessions will be held, some with illustrated lectures, small 
group sessions will be held on the basic techniques of film making. 

Laboratory Fee: $15.00. 



PA 220 



Film Production, industrial. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PA 210 or permission of instructor. 
Transformation of an idea into film: initial analysis, film script, pre- 
production planning, nature of the production process. Production of 
a short film by team. Emphasis is on industrial film making. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



DA 00/^ Film Production, Advertising. 
tf\ ^tJ\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; PA 210 or permission of instructor. 
Creative process involved in translating advertising copy to film based 
upon advertising objectives and consumer motivation and appeals. 
Production of "Spots" by teams. 

Laboratory Fee: $20.00. 



PA ■^QO Administrative Law. 

■ '^ OJ^Vy Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The basic legal arrangement of administrative organization; rules gov- 
erning use and exercise of administrative powers; legal procedures 
for enforcement of bureaucratic responsibility. 

P/V Af\Q Collective Bargaining In the Public Sector. 
' '^ *+^^0 Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Analysis of collective bargaining in the public sector with emphasis 
on legislation pertaining to government employees. 

P A AAQ independent Study. 

I r^ '-r'^iP Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Independent study to be performed in a project of interest to the 
student and under the direction of a faculty member to be desig- 
nated by the department chairman. Project, student, and faculty 
director must be approved by both the department chairman and the 
Dean of Business. 

PA A.OiC\ Principles of Public Health Administration. 
trK *+i7W Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An examination of the patterns of public health activities, including 
the delivery systems in the United States. 



DA '301 Prrnciples of Public Administration. 
if^ Ovy I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PS 121 and PS 122. 

The development, organization, functions, and problems of national, 

state, and local administration. 



PA 491 



Public Health Law. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The role of law in public health. Enforcement and administration: 
legal tools and administrative technique of public health enforcement 
and administration. 



PA302 



Procedures in Public Administration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PA 301. 

Administration and management in government through the offices 

of planning, finance, personnel, and procurement. 



Seminar in Public Administration. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Selected topics related to public administration will be discussed. 



PA 51 2 



DA 'Q07 ^^^3n and Regional Problems. 
il"^ OW / Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Methods and analysis of decision making related to urban problems. 
Topics include housing, racial tensions, poverty, transportation, 
architectural planning, pollution, and urban politics. 



DA *300 Municipal Finance and Budgeting. 
r'^ «JfcV^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 114 Municipal Accounting. 

This course involves the analysis of fiscal policy on the municipal 
level. The financing of and budgeting for the activities, services, and 
improvements determined as necessary by elected representatives. 



no 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



RETAILING W. Smith, Acting Chairman 



DCTT *3 1 /^ Retail Merchandise Management. 
•^'— ' O I l>^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; BA 105 and BA301. 

Deals with the planning and control of stock to contribute to achieve- 
ment of predetermined objectives. Current concepts, objectives, plan- 
ning, pricing and inventory control are all discussed. 



RET 209 



Retail Advertising and Sales Promotion. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 107. 

This course is intended to develop a sound approach to retail adver- 
tising. The difference in advertising techniques between various types 
of stores is stressed. The determination of what, how and when to 
promote and measurement of the retail market is also emphasized 
during the semester. 



RET 21 2 



Textiles. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105. 

A study of the nature, source, characteristics, applications, and uses 
of basic textile materials. The processes of manufacture are studied. 
End uses studied include women's, girls', infants', men's and boys' 
wear. Swatches are analyzed by students in class. 

DCTT O 1 *3 Furniture and Apparel Accessories. 
'^*— ' ^ I O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequsite: BA 105. 

Historical background of furniture, floor coverings, glassware, china- 
ware, and interior decoration, manufacturing processes and brand 
names. The uniqueness and design of apparel accessories is studied. 



SCIENCE AND BIOLOGY 

H. Fessenden Wright, Chairman and Director of 
Environmental Studies 



SC 111-112 



Physical Science. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The meaning of scientific concepts and terms and their relation to 
other areas of learning and to daily living. Development and unity of 
physical science as a field of knowledge. Subject material includes 
astronomy, physics, chemistry, and geology. 



C^ 1 1 O Physical Science Laboratory. 
^^^ I I O Credit, 1 semester hour. 

Prerequisite: SC 111, to be taken with SC 112 or after. 
Direct experience with physical experimentation. Training in design, 
conduct, analysis, and reporting of physical experiments. Emphasis on 
historically important theories and experiments. Use of simple equip- 
ment leading to direct observable results. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



Dp"T O •! K Retail Credit Management. 
r^^- ' ^ I *-? Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A HI, 

This course treats retail credit operations. The consideration of pros- 
pective credit customers, the decision-making process involved in 
accepting or rejecting credit and finally, the collection of accounts 
are all viewed as they contribute to company objectives. 



SC 115 



Nutrition and Dietetics. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Various types of foods, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and hormones 
and the processes and products of digestion. Factors and effects of 
malnutrition, food additives, and spoiled food. Concepts and composi- 
tion of balanced and special diets. 



OC — r OO*^ Fashions in Retailing. 
r^.C I OV/O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 105. 

A history of fashion design in relation to the retail field. The work of 
prominent French, American and English designers is studied. Stress 
is placed on sales promotion aspects of the fashion industry as it 
relates to the retail field. 



^^ 1 1 f^ Fundamentals of Food Science. 
<^V.^ I I \^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Food sources, methods of preservation and storage, spoilage, sanita- 
tion, food contaminants, and food as a waste product are discussed 
at an elementary level. One hour of class time per week will be 
devoted to laboratory or field work. 

Laboratory Fee: $10.00. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



111 



SC 121-122 



General Biology. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The major areas of biology, the concepts and theories of the science. 
Cell structure and function are stressed during the discussion of the 
various organ systems. Genetics, animal behavior, ecology, develop- 
ment, evolution, and taxonomy are covered during the second term. 



SC202 



SCI 23 



Human Biology. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; SC 121. 

A condensed study of Human Anatomy and Physiology with some 
aspects of nutrition and disease included, and an introduction to 
Population Genetics and Physical Anthropology. Designed to replace 
SC 122 for those majoring in Psychology, Law Enforcement, and 
Sociology and Social Services. For laboratory credit, where needed, 
SC 132 may be taken concurrently or with permission after com- 
pleting course worl(. For laboratory credit, where needed, SC 131 or 
132 should be taken. 

O^ I ofr Astronomy. 

^^— ' ' ^v? Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to astronomy and the methods employed by astrono- 
mers in obtaining and analyzing information of the universe around us. 



SC 131-132 



General Biology Laboratory. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

To be taken with or after SC 121 or SC 122. 

The microscopic examination of cells and tissues and the dissection 
of various organisms from the earthworm to the fetal pig. Other ex- 
periments relate to classroom materials. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

^r^ 1 '^^ ^"^'^^ Science. 

^^^ ' OiP Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A dynamic systems-approach to phenomena of geology, oceanography, 
and meterology. Emphasis on inter-relations of factors and processes 
and on importance of subject matter to human affairs. Suitable for 
non-science as well as as for science majors. 

^(^ 1 ^f^ Fundamentals of Oceanography. 

•-'^^ ' *+^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Description of major aspects of geological, chemical, physical, and 

biological oceanography. Emphasis on human use and disuse of oceans. 

Suitable for non-science as well as science majors. 

C^ 001 Genetics. 

•^^^ ^W I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122. SC 123, SC 251, or SC 252. 
Mendelian genetics and developments that have produced the modern 
concept of inheritance; the role of DNA and theories of the chemical 
basis of heredity. Various aspects of human, medicinal, and population 
genetics and the role of these in evolutionary processes. 



Genetics Laboratory. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 201. 

Theory and techniques using flies, yeasts, bacteria, and viruses to 

illustrate the classical genetic theories. An introduction to biometrics. 

One assigned lecture-laboratory session and one laboratory period 

unassigned. 

Laboratory Fee; $18.00. 

C^ Oil 'O 1 O Human Anatomy and Physiology. 
^^^ ^ ' ' "^ ' ^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132 or SC 251. 

The essentials of human anatomy and physiology. Systems studied one 
at a time, taking up the anatomical features first and then the physio- 
logical functions. Both normal and pathological conditions discussed 
whenever possible. 



SC 213-214 



Human Anatomy and Physiology 

Laboratory. 

Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites; SC 122 and SC 132 or SC 251. 
To be taken with or after SC 211-212. 

Examination of organs and organ systems, using plastic models, slides 
of cells and tissues, human bones, and dissection of preserved mam- 
malian organs (cow's eyes, sheep's brain). Transparencies and film 
loops used as supplemental material. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 

C^ 001 Human Ecology. 

^^^ ^^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Ecosystem structure and function. Understanding human involvement 
in and alteration of ecosystems through use of resources and pollu- 
tion, economic, cultural and behavioral factors, overpopulation. 



Q/^ OOp Ecology. 

•-'^^ ^-^^' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 251 or SC 252. 

The interactions of living organisms, including man, with each other 
and with their environment. Discussion of population regulation, habi- 
tats, food supply, predation, and distribution, community structure 
regulation, succession, and diversity: ecosystems, geochemistry, and 
energy. 

CC^ *P''PA f'^''' Ecology. 

^>-^ ^^*+ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 222 (May be taken concurrently). 
One hour of class and one afternoon of laboratory in which basic- 
ecological concepts will be demonstrated by the gathering and inter- 
pretation of field and laboratory data. 

Laboratory Fee; $18.00. 



112 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



SC225 



Evolution. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 122. 

Biochemical and organic evolution studied. Physical anthropology and 
paleontology introduced, and the relationship of evolution to genetics 
and ecology. 

Cf^ ^^7 Entomology w/Lab. 
^^-^ ^^ / Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132 or SC 251. 

Study of classification, evolution, anatomy, development, ecology, life- 
cycle, genetics, and systematics of insects, arachnoids, and myriapods. 
Insects as major competitors of man, as disease carriers, and their 
influences on history and culture. Fundamental biological principles as 
related to insects. Laboratory: culture, observation, and dissection of 
insects. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C(~* ^C^l Zoology w/Lab. 

^-'^-^ ^O I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or Biology major. 

The general morphology and physiology of animals from the amoeba 

to man, taken phylum by phylum. Dissection of representative 

animals from the major phyla, special emphasis on the Phyla 

Invertebrata. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C^ ^CZ^ Botany w/Lab. 

■^^-^ ^O^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or Biology major. 
The comparative structure, function, habitat, and evolutionary rela- 
tionships of plants, techniques of plant identihcation and classification. 
Field trips conducted when possible. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



SC 291-292 



Biology Laboratory Teaching. 
Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132, and permission of the instructor. 
Designed for prospective teachers, department majors, and laboratory 
assistants. Students supervised by an instructor in techniques con- 
cerning laboratory instruction, testing, grading, purchase, and inven- 
tory of supplies and equipment. 

C/"^ *5<^ 1 Microbiology w/Lab. 

i:3V^ *Z>\J I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131; or SC 251 or SC 252; CH 103. 
A history of microbiology and a survey of microbial life. Bacteria as 
characteristic protoypes of all microorganisms; the environment, 
growth, reproduction, metabolism, and relationship to man of micro- 
organisms. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



C(^ '^O^ Bacteriology w/Lab. 
^^^ OV^^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and SC 132; CH 103. 

Theoretical and laboratory study of the morphology, physiology, and 

classification of bacteria and other microorganisms. The application 

of these facts to agriculture, industry, sanitation, public health, and 

disease. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 

O^ *^0*^ Histology w/Lab. 
^^^ OWO Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 121 and SC 131 or SC 251. 

Microscopic and chemical structure of organs and tissues and their 

cell constituents. Microscopic observations, tissue staining, and slide 

preparation. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

O^ *^07 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy w/ Lab. 
^^-^ *^^ ^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 251. 

The structure, origin, and evolutionary history of the vertebrate organ 
systems. In the laboratory, representative species of each vertebrate 
class dissected, with attention given to the individual organ systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

Cf '^OR General Physiology w/Lab. 
^^-^ OWO Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 251-252, CH 105-106, PH 103-104, PH 105-106. 
Basic theories of physiology as applied to plants and animals. Practical 
aspects and experimental techniques studied in the laboratory. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C^ '^OQ Plant Morphology and Taxonomy w/Lab. 
^^^ OW27 Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 252. 

Comparative plant structure and reproduction, particularly as related 
to the classification of plants. Laboratory parallels the classroom, 
involving examination of microscopic slides, models, preserved speci- 
mens, and gross structures of dissected materials. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C^ *^*^1 Animal Behavior. 

•-^^-^ OO I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 and P 111. 

Behavioral patterns of animals studied on a comparative basis. Laws 
and principles of ethology related to genetics, psychology, ecology, 
evolution, physiology, and social structure. 

C^ '^f>1 Biochemistry I w/Lab. 

•^^-' *-''0 I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122, SC 132, SC 251, and CH 106. 
Functional groups of organic compounds, the physiological properties 
of these classes of compounds, and the mechanisms of their elimination 
from the system. The interaction and synthesis of these compounds 
will also be studied. Lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



113 



C{^ *^f^'0 Biochemistry II w/Lab. 
*-^^^ »J\_»^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 361 or CH 104-108 or CH 301-302; and SC 122, 
SC 132. 

Ammo acids, proteins, enzymes, coenzymes, vitamins, carbohydrates, 
nucleaic acids, lipids, and certain all<aloids are discussed as to their 
chemical, physical, and biological properties. Isolated enzyme reactions 
and the more important metabolic pathways are examined. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

Of^ Af)'] Embryology w/Lab. 

*^^^ *-l'^^ I Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 251. 

Origin and development of tissues, organs, and organ-systems during 
the embryonic and post-embryonic stages. In the laboratory, the chick 
grown and studied at various stages. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C/^ AC)^ Cytology w/Lab. 

*-^^^ *-FV-'^. Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 362. 

Structure and basic concepts of cellular and tissue function on the 
molecular, subcellular, and cellular level, problems and techniques of 
cellular biology. Tissue culture techniques in laboratory. The micro- 
scope and audio-visual equipment also employed. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



SC501 



Parasitology w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 251; SC 131 or SC 302. 

Life history, physiology, morphology, reproductive cycle, and economic 
importance of most common parasites of plants and animals. Spread 
and control of communicable and organic diseases. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C^ C^O^ ^'^^^ ^^^^f and Marine Biology. 
■J\^ sJKJC- Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 251, SC 252, and SC 222. 

Aquatic organisms, their life-cycles, and their ecological factors. 

Causes of pollution when equilibria are upset. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

Cr^ C^O*^ Pathology w/Lab. 
.J^w 'JKJ-^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 212, SC 251, and SC 301. 

Causes, symptoms, progress, effect and control of diseases of animals, 
primarily man. Laboratory observation of diseased cells, tissues, and 
organs will be conducted partly at the University of New Haven and 
partly at St. Raphael's Hospital. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



C.(~* ^C^A Phycology and Mycology w/Lah. 
'-'^^ vJ*-'*-* Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 251 and SC 252. 

Fresh-water and certain marine algae and the various types of fungi. 
Structure, physiology, life-cycles, reproduction, nutrition, ecology, their 
function as disease producers. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C^C^ C^O^ Neuroendocrine Physiology. 
-J\^ ^\JsJ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P 111; SC 123 or SC 212. 

Morphology and physiology of the neurological and endocrine systems 
as related to the control of body functions. Relationship to behavior 
with examples from psychobiology and ethology. 

C^ C^Of^ ^""'^ Science and Technology. 
-^^-* ^\J\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 301-302; SC 361-362. 

Man's food, its spoilage, preservation, and sanitation are presented. 
Food additives and the waste and pollution of the food industry are 
also studied. 

C^ C^C)'7 Characterization and Treatment of Wastes w/Lab. 
•^^-' *-f^<J f Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 135, SC 306. SC 361-362. 

The types of waste materials generated by agriculture, industry, trans- 
portation, municipalities, and individuals are classified, and the methods 
of their identification are studied. The various methods of treatment 
of each type of waste material are covered. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C^ C^OA Water Quality Control and Pollution Ecology w/Lab. 
^\^ sJKJUD Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 301 or SC 302; SC 306 and SC 507. 
Recognition of the organisms of polluted waters and the selection of 
the most appropriate means of collection and analysis. Proper choice 
and use of analytical methods for determining water quality with the 
methods of analyzing the data. The most efficient methods to establish 
water purity of the desired quality and the ecology of polluted water 
containing various wastes. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C^ C^OQ Scientific Photographic Documentation. 
"^^-^ ■^^-'"--' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

2 lectures and 1 laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: SC 121122 or SC 251-252 and instructor's permission. 
Theory and practice of photographic image formation and recording. 
Lecture, demonstration, and laboratory experience. Photography and 
documentation of natural objects, organisms, and artifacts of bio- 
logical, medical, pathological, and forensic interest. Photomicroscopic, 
ultra-violet, infra-red, color, and black and white techniques. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



114 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



SC510 



General Environmental Health. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122, SC 123 or SC 251; SC 301 or SC 302; and CH 
106. 

Communicable diseases and their spread and control; environmental 
factors affecting public health, applications of the principles of sani- 
tation and health to the solution of environmental problems. Popula- 
tion trends and the collection and evaluation of statistics concerned 
with public health. Various aspects of preventive medicine. 

^^ K1 O Air Pollutants w/Lab. 
wv.* O I O Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 104-108; CH 201; SC 301 or SC 302; SC 361-362. 
Physical, chemical, and biological properties and sources of the major 
air pollutants. New and older methods of sampling, identification, and 
measurement are presented. 

Laboratory Fee; $18.00. 



C^ C^'} A Air Quality Control and Management w/Lab. 
^^^ ^ ' ^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 513 (can be taken concurrently). 
Historical presentation and definition of air pollution problems. Ap- 
proaches for abatement and presentation and the strategy to achieve 
objectives of air quality that meet regional standards. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



SCSI 5 



Biophysics I w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106; SC 362; PH 104-106; M 116. 
Principles and properties of large and small molecules in solutions, 
particularly in body fluids. Physical laws and theories of gases, liquids, 
and solutions. Thermal chemistry and reaction rates as related to bio- 
logical systems. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



SCSI 6 



Biophysics II w/Lab. 
Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: CH 106; SC 362; PH 104106; M 116. 

Physical laws and theories as related to muscle, skeletal, sense organ, 

nerve and other physiological actions. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 



C/"* C^l 7 P^l A Bio-Techniques. 
*-'^-' ■»-^ ' ' "■^ • *-' Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Biology major and permission of instructor. 
Clinical and research techniques used in the biological sciences. 
Advanced microscopy, photomicroscopy, cell and tissue culturation, 
clinical techniques, and instrumental procedures. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 



Cf^ ^1 Q Pharmacology w/Lab. 
"^^^^ ^ ' ^ Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 or SC 123 and SC 132; or SC 251-252; SC 361 
or CH 302. 

Science of medicmals and other chemicals and their effects produced 
by use and abuse on living organisms, the mechanisms whereby these 
effects are produced. Relation of structure to activity methods of 
assay, and metabolic pathways involved. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

C/~* C^^l Toxicology w/Lab. 

^^-' ^^ • Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SC 122 or SC 123 and SC 132, or SC 251-252; SC 361 
or CH 302. 

The action of chemicals, particularly poisons, on living organisms. 
Relation of structure to activity, mechanisms of detoxication (in vivo), 
and reason for activity studied. Methods of isolation, identification and 
characterization from tissues, toxic limits, methods of assay, types 
of antidotes used. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00. 

CC C^O/I Psychobiology. 

»^^> sJ^*-r Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P 111, SC 122 or 123, SC 132, and CH 106. 
A study of the biological factors of behavior, with concepts drawn 
from numerous related disciplines, such as physiology, pharmacology, 
ethnology, ecology, anthropology, psychology, and biochemistry. One 
of the more recent advances in this field is that of the environmental 
impact on behavior patterns. 



SCS61-562 



Advanced Biochemistry. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SC 362. 

Enzymology and the more important metabolic pathways, including 
those of alkaloid synthesis. Physiological results due to various 
enzymatic reactions, 

O^ C^QI C^QO Seminar and Senior Thesis. 
^^-^ wS? I -iJZP^ Credit, 2 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Biology major in 3rd or 4th year. 
Hourly weekly meetings during which prepared papers are read by 
members of the class. Each student, with his adviser, must select a 
topic which from library sources is developed into a "Library Thesis." 
The contents of this thesis must be defended before department 
faculty members. 



SC S95-596 



Laboratory Research. 
Credit, 1-6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: Biology major. Permission of the department. 
Choice of a research topic, literature search, planning of experiments, 
experimentation, and correlation of results in a written report, under 
the guidance of a department faculty member. 

Laboratory Fee: $18.00 per semester. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



115 



C(~^ VZQQ Independent Study. 

^^^ Oi7C7 Credit, 1-3 semester hours, maximum of 6. 

Prerequisites: Biology major. Permission of the department. 

Laboratory Fee: $5.00 per credit hour. 



C/^ ^'^1 Juvenile Delinquency. 

•^^^^ ^-'^ ' Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as CJ 221) 

Prerequisites: SO 113 and P 111. 

An analysis of delinquent behavior in American society; examination of 
the theories and social correlates of delinquency, and the socio-legal 
processes and apparatus for dealing with juvenile delinquency. 



SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WELFARE 

Faith H. Eikaas, Chairman 



SO250 



Research Methods. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: P 301, BA 216 or permission of instructor. 
The student develops the concepts necessary for selection and formu- 
lation of research problems in social science, research design and 
techniques, analysis and interpretation of research data. 



QO 11*^ Sociology. 

-i?v_/ I I *_> Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The role of culture in society, the person, and personality; groups and 
group behavior; institutions; social interaction and social change. 



O/^ 'Q 1 O Primary Group Interaction. 
•-^'^ »-' ' ^-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Exploration of communication in group process, building a group and 
analyzing group structure and interaction; the ways people communi- 
cate emotionally and intellectually. 



C/^ \ \ A Contemporary Social Problems. 

OV_/ I I *+ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

The major problems which confront the present social order, and the 

methods now in practice or being considered for dealing with these 

problems. 

^O 1 ^^ Political and Social Thought of the Third World. 
^^<^ ' ^*+ Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as PS 164). 

The emergence of the Third World as a decisive force in world 
political, social, economic, and cultural thought. 

C/^ ^ 1 R ^^^ Community. 

^^'>-' ^ ' *-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

The Community and its provision for health education, recreation, 
safety, and welfare — theoretical concepts of "Community" plus case 
studies of small scale human communities used to introduce students 
to fundamental concepts of "Community" — ethnographies include 
studies of factories, hospitals, primitive villages, small towns, etc. 

O/^ ^P1 Cultural Anthropology. 

-^^^^ ^-^- I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A systematic survey of the customs of man found in preliterate 
societies as well as modern societies. A study of the evolution of 
culture and analyses of religion, economics, language, kinship, art, 
etc. as found in primitive and modern cultures. 



C/^ *^ 1 1 Criminology. 

'^'^^ *-' ' • Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as CJ 311) 

Prerequisites: P 111 and SO 113. 

An introduction to the principles and concepts of Criminology: 

analysis of the social context of criminal behavior, including a review 

of criminological theory, the nature and distribution of crime, the 

sociology of criminal law, and the societal reactions to crime and 

criminals. 



SO 31 2 



Marriage and the Family. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

The structure and function of the family in American Society: analysis 
of social relations within the institution. Factors contributing to its suc- 
cessful functioning, and those leading to alienation and social dis- 
organization. 



C(^ '^ 1 ^ Social Change. 

•^^^ -^ ' «J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Sources, patterns, and processes of social change with examination 
of classical and modern theories of major trends and developments 
as well as studies of perspectives on micro levels of change in 
modern society. 



116 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



C(^ "^1 A Political Sociology. 
^'>-' *3 ' O Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. (Offered even years, spring semester) 

(Same as PS 318) 

Concepts, theories, and basic Issues In the sociological analysis of 

political systems, social factors In political attitudes and behavior 

with emphasis on understanding the functional and dysfunctional 

aspects of socio-political coordination and conflict. 



SO320 



Social Psychology. 

Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as P 321) 

Prerequisites: P 111 and SO 113. 

The interdependence of social organizations and behavior. The Inter- 
relationships between role systems and personality; attitude analysis, 
development, and modification; group Interaction analysis; social 
conformity; social class and human behavior. 

C/^ '^'Pl Social Stratification. 
^^<^ O^ I Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Organization of social class: status, power, and process of social 
mobility In contemporary society. Social stratification, Its functions 
and dysfunctions, as It relates to the distribution of opportunity, 
privilege, and power In an Industrial society. 

C/^ '^^^ Sociology of Education. 
•-''^ O^^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The effects of education on American society: the organizational 
structure of educational systems at the primary, secondary and uni- 
versity levels with major emphasis on the Interactive roles of students, 
teachers and administrators — particular concern with the relationship 
between education and socio-economic status and with problems 
of organizational change In the American school system. 

C/^ 00 1 Population Problems and Human Ecology. 
*-''^ OO I cedjt, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113, or consent of Instructor. Offered odd years, spring. 
A sociological approach to social demography with attention given to 
population statistics found In U. S. Census reports and vital statistics 
reports. The quantitative patterns of distribution of population, and 
population changes and trends. 

C/^ '^.rf'lO Medical Sociology. 
-^^<-^ >^*-^yj Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the instructor. Offered even 
years, spring. 

An analysis of one of our major social Institutions, the health care 
field. Emphasis will be placed on the soclo-cultural aspects of the field: 
a general overview of the organization and delivery of health care 
services and the current problems and Issues. 



O/^ '^QO Sociology of Organizations. 
^^^ Oi7W Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the Instructor. Offered even 
years, spring. 

Classical sociological theories of organization with emphasis on the 
concepts of bureaucracy, scientific management, human relations and 
decision making theory. The relevance of these Ideas to concrete 
organizational contexts, e.g., civil service, business, social movements 
and political parties, charitatile institutions, hospitals, etc. 

O/^ ,^00 Minority Group Relations. 
"^'^ *+*^V-' Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SO 113. 

An interdisciplinary survey of minority groups In this country with 
particular attention paid to those ethnic, religious, and racial factors 
that influence interaction. Designed to promote an understanding of 
sub-group cultures. 

QO /11 O ^'^^" Sociology. 
^^'>-' *+ ' '^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

The problems of the cities. Residential patterns together with the 
physical development of cities and redevelopment plans. An examina- 
tion of groups of people and their environment and the relationship 
between the two. 

C/^ /111 Industrial Relations. 

^'<-' ** ' ' Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as BA 231) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor and Sociology Chairman. 
Human factors in the management function Including union-manage- 
ment relations, history of human relations, individual and group 
productivity, the company, and the community. 



S0413 



Foundations of Sociological Theory. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Nine hours in Sociology. 

An analysis of the development of sociology in the nineteenth cen- 
tury with particular emphasis on the theories of Comte, Durkhelm, 
Simmel, Weber, Marx, de Tocqueville, and others. 

C/^ Ay A Sociology of Occupations and Professions. 
^'^ ^ ' ^ Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113 or permission of the Instructor. 

A sociological analysis of the division of labor, occupational groupings, 

career patterns and professional associations in modern society. 



S0418 



Public Opinion and Social Pressure. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. (Same as 
PS 418) 

Prerequisites: SO 113, P 111 (offered even years, fall semester). 
An Intensive analysis of the nature and development of public opinion 
with particular consideration of the roles, both actual and potential, 
of communication and Influence. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



117 



S0 440 



Undergraduate Seminar. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: 21 semester hours in Sociology. 

Required of Sociology majors. A detailed examination of selected 
topics m the field of sociology and a critical analysis of pertinent 
theories with emphasis on modern social thought. 



SW 350-351 



S0 450 



Research Seminar. 
Credit. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P 301 or BA 216 Statistics. 

The student develops and carries out an original research project in 

social science, reporting his procedure to the class. 



SO 599 



Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 

a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated by 
the student. 



SOCIAL WELFARE CONCENTRATION 

Richard C. Foley, Acting Coordinator 



The following courses, with the exception of SW 425, must be taken 
by all social work students in order to achieve recognition as a pro- 
fessional at the bachelor's degree level. 



SW220 



introduction to Social Welfare. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Organizations in the community and the problems that they face. 
How these organizations developed, how they function, and how they 
utilize social workers. Ways of dealing with community problems. 
Field trips to organizations serving the New Haven area. Basic 
observational skills will also be taught. 

C\A/ *^^r\ Human Dynamics. 
.i?VV >J'-t\J Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SO 113. 

Phases of psychosexual development, together with the problems 
that develop in each stage. The psychosocial history and its inter- 
pretation. Group dynamics and the meaning of group interaction. 



SW40 1-402 



SW 41 5-41 6 



Social Welfare as a Social Institution 

I and II. 

Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite; SW 220. Credit for one semester only with permission 

of Coordinator. 

The relationships between the present social welfare system and the 

socio-economic and political systems of the United States. The history 

of the concepts of social welfare, the current programs, policies, and 

issues. 

Field Instruction I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Registration only by permission of the Coordinator of Social Welfare. 
Prerequisite or concurrent SW 415-416. Credit for one semester only 
with permission of Coordinator. 

Direct service activities in a social work agency in the community 
to further the development of the skills needed for the practice of 
social work. Field instruction is individually planned with each student. 
Seminars in conjunction with the field work experience provide an 
opportunity for an understanding of group and individual dynamics. 

Methods of Intervention I and II. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SW 350-351. 

The skills needed for the practice of social work. How to approach 
a situation in a professional manner. How to understand a situa- 
tion, set goals, and initiate and carry out a program to meet these 
goals. Case records are studied to familiarize the student with real 
life situations in which to apply the methods of intervention. Through 
role playing the students will develop their skill in talking to and 
listening to others. Emphatic ability is developed. 

(elective) Race Relations. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: SW 215 or SO 113. 

The student begins to deal with his own attitudes towards minority 

groups. He is helped to understand these attitudes and then to work 

with them in a program of reading and activity in the University and 

community. 

Issues in Social Work. 
Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SW 401. 

Students explore their views on the role of social work in today's 
society, the ethical considerations faced by the profession, and the 
students' place in the profession and in society. 

Independent Study. 

Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 

a maximum of 12. 

Prerequisites; Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 



SW425 



SW475 



SW599 



118 



THEATER ARTS John Collinson, Coordinator 



T 131-132 



Introduction to the Theater. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Using the theater resources of the New Haven area, students will 
study topics such as piaywriting, directing, acting, set design, dramatic 
criticism. Students must pay theater admissions. 



T 141-142 



World Drama and Theater. 
Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Dramatic literature from classical times to the present, considered 
its contemporary theatrical setting. 



T *^^1 Q^O Acting and Directing. 
' ^^' ' ~^'-*-^ Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Exercises in acting and directing, moving from the elementary to the 
complex. Emphasis on acting during the first semester and directing 
during the second. The student may participate in major workshop 
productions. 

"T^QI ^Q^ Theater Arts Seminar. 
' ^'^ ' ■**^^- Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: T 13M32, T 141-142, T 341-342 or Instructor's consent. 
Independent study in special areas of drama: theater history, dramatic 
literature, criticism, piaywriting, directing, acting. 

T 5QQ Independent Study. 

*-*^-''^ Credit, 1-3 semester hours per semester with 
a maximum of 12. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and chairman of department. 
Opportunity for the student under the direction of a faculty member 
to explore an area of interest to him. This course must be initiated 
by the student. 




ADMINISTRATION 



119 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



NORMAN I. BOTWINIK, Chairman 
President, Botwinik Brothers, Inc. 

ROBERT M. GORDON, Vice Chairman 

President, The Milford Rivet & Machine Company 

GEORGE R. TIERNAN, Secretary 
Attorney at Law 

HUBERT C. HODGE, Assistant Secretary 
President, American Buckle Company 

HAROLD G. ANDERSON 

The Southern Connecticut Gas Company 

WILLIAM C. BAZILCHUK 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

JAMES Q. BENSEN 

Resident Manager, Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

ROLAND M. BIXLER 

President, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

MRS. KINGMAN BREWSTER, JR. 

PETER H. COMSTOCK 

Chairman of the Board and President, Pratt-Read Corporation 

CHARLES H. COSTELLO 

Chairman of the Board, C. Cowles & Co. 

ABBOTT H. DAVIS, JR. 

Vice President — Marketing 

The Southern New England Telephone Company 

MORTON DENERSTEIN 

Evening Student, University of New Haven 

PETER J. DESIO 

Associate Professor, University of New Haven 



BIAGIO DiLIETO 

Chief of Police, New Haven 

CAROLINE A. DINEGAR 

Professor, University of New Haven 

ROBERT B. DODDS 

Chairman of the Board, Safety Electrical Equipment Corporation 

EDWARD J. DREW 

Manager, Quinnipiack Club 

JOSEPH F. DUPLINSKY 

President of the Alumni Association 

JOHN E. ECHLIN 

Chairman of the Executive Committee 
Echlin Manufacturing Company 

STUART W. FINLAY 

Formerly, Shearson, Hammill & Co., Inc. 

FREDERICK G. FISCHER 

Certified Public Accountant 

ELLIOT GANT 

Investment Banker 

NATHAN HAMILTON 
Attorney at Law 

JOHN M. HEATH 

Adjunct Professor, University of New Haven 

MICHAEL J. JACKSON 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

EDWARD P. LEONARD, JR. 

Evening Student, University of New Haven 

WILLIAM F. LEONARD 

Director of Corporate Relations, Olin Corporation 



ELLIS C. MAXCY 
Formerly, President 
The Southern New England Telephone Company 

ALAN J. McBEAN 

Secretary and Treasurer 

The Southern New England Telephone Company 

ROBERT I. METCALF 

Formerly, Vice President— Public Affairs, Olln Corporation 
GEORGE L MORDECAI 

The Southern New England Telephone Company 
HERBERT H. PEARCE 

President, H. Pearce Company 

MARVIN K. PETERSON 

President of the University 

MRS. WILLIAM F. ROBINSON, SR. 

MRS. GLORIA SCHAFFER 
Secretary of the State 



MRS. SHIRLEE SCHAFFER 

Writer and Commentator, WELI 

DONALD L SHERMAN 

General Executive, YMCA of New Haven 

BULKELEY SMITH 

Formerly, President of the Manufacturers Division 
New Haven Chamber of Commerce 

EDWARD D. TADDEI 

Alumni Representative 

LEON J. TALAUY 

General Manager, B. F. Goodrich Sponge Products Division 

DAVID CRAIG VILLA 

Day Student, University of New Haven 

CHARLES B. WOMER 

Director, Yale-New Haven Hospital 

FELIX ZWEIG 

Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Yale University 



ADMINISTRATION 



PHILLIPS. KAPLAN, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., President 

MARVIN K. PETERSON, B.S. in Econ., M.Ed., L.H.D., President Emeritus 

DOUGLAS ROBILLARD, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Arts and Sciences 

WARREN J. SMITH, B.A., M.B.A., Dean, School of Business Administration 

THOMAS C. WARNER, JR., B.E., M.S., Dean, School of Engineering 

L. CRAIG PARKER, JR., B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., Director, Division of Criminal Justice 

JOSEPH A. PARKER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean, The Graduate School 

RICHARD M. LIPP, B.S., M.B.A., Director, Division of Continuing Education 

MURIEL C. MACKAY, Continuing Education Registrar 

DAVID R. WILSON, B.S., Assistant Director of Continuing Education 



FACULTY 1972-1973 



121 



Abbagnaro, Peter J., Lecturer, Business Administration 
AS., B.S., Quinnipiac College 

Albert, Eleanor, Lecturer, English 

B.A., Barnard College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Alderman, Fred, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.A., University of Mictiigan; M.S., University of Bridgeport 

Ailing, Roger D., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., Yale University 
C.P.A. (Conn.) 

Amln-Mallak, Zuheir, Assistant Professor, Business Administration 
B.A., University of Damascus; M.B.A., Wharton School of Finance, 
University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
(on leave of absence) 

Anderson, George, Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.E.M.E., M.E., Yale University 

Andrews, Norrls, Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.Arch., M.C.P., Yale University 

Andros, Philip K., Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., University of New Haven; M.S.E.E., University of Con- 
necticut 

Arnold, Joseph J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S , M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Astarita, Edward, Lecturer, Hotel Management 

A.S., University of New Haven; B.S., New York University; M.S.. 
Columbia University 

Auten, Thomas A., Lecturer, Materials Engineering 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Case Institute of Technology 
Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University 

Baerman, Donald J., Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.A.. Yale University 

Ball, Robert B., Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., Southern Methodist University; M.A., Tulane University 

Baum, Stefan, H., Lecturer, Business Administration 

Masters M.E., Technical Institute Berlin-Charlottenburg; Ph.D. 
Friedrich Wilhelm University 

Beeken, Ramona, Assistant Professor, English 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; M.A., Trinity College 



Bell, Srilekha, Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin 

Berg, Harold, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
A.S., B.S., University of New Haven 

Berger, Mark, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Columbia University; LL.B., Yale University 

Berliner, Paul F., Lecturer, Music 

B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Wesleyan University 

Bernard. Joseph F., Jr., Assistant Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola University; M.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Bernardo, Robert, Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., University of Massachusetts; M.S.E.E., New York University 

Bethel, Charles, Lecturer, Political Science 
A.B., Princeton University 

Blake. John, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 

Blaskey, Joel W., Special Lecturer, Science and Biology 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College, M.A., Fairfield University 

Blood, Gerald W., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.A., Hope College; M.B.A., Northwestern University 

Bodnovich, Stephen, Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S,, Fordham University 

Boivan, Joseph J., Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
A.S., Maine Vocational Technical Institute 

Bourdeau, Richard, Lecturer, Hotel Management 
B.S., University of Bridgeport 
C.P.A. (Conn.) 

Brown, David, Professor, Psychology 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Columbia University 
Consulting Psychologist (Licensed, Conn.) 

Buckingham, Robert W., Lecturer, Sociology 

B,A., University of Arizona; M.A., Wesleyan University 

Burns, Donald, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.A., Teachers' College, Columbia 
University 



122 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Burt, William J., Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 

Butun, Hilmi, Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., Robert College, Istanbul, Turkey; M.S.C.E., University of 
Michigan 

Cannavaciolo, Alphonse D., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Central Connecticut State College; M.A., University of Con- 
necticut; M.A., Wesleyan University 

Carriuolo, Margaret, Special Lecturer, Transitional Studies 
B.A., University of New Haven 

Carriuolo, Ralf E., Assistant Professor, Humanities 
B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt College 

Carson, George R., Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College, New York; M.S.C.E., Columbia University 

Caruso, Mario A., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., University of Connecticut 
CP.A. (Conn.) 

Cash, Barbara L., Lecturer, Fine Arts 

B.S., Skidmore College; B.F.A., Yale University 

Cassella, Dominic P., Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.S.CI,, University of Miami 

Celotto, William F., Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.S.E.. M.S., University of Connecticut 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Chandra, Satish, Assistant Professor, Business Administration 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; LL.B., 
LucknovK Law School, India; LL.M., J.S.D., Yale University 

Chardiet, Armando, Lecturer, History 

B.A., Dartmouth College; Doctor of Law and Advanced Study, Uni- 
versity of Havana 

Chepaitis, Eiia, Lecturer, History 

A.B., Manhattanville College; M.A., Georgetown University 

Chepaitis, Joseph, Assistant Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 

Chhabra, Om P., Lecturer, Materials Engineering 

B.S., Panjab University, India; M.S., Utah University 

Chun, Kee W., Professor, Physics 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Princeton University; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

Ciarlone, Richard, Lecturer, Economics and Business Administration, 
Graduate School 
B.A., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., University of Maryland 



Ciulla, Robert K., Lecturer, Political Science 
B.A., Williams College; LL.B., Yale University 

Clark, Benjamin, Lecturer, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Buffalo; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology 

Cleaver, David S., Assistant Professor, Economics 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Clifford, Frank M., Instructor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., University of Bridgeport 

Codlin, Kenneth E., Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.A., Northwestern University; M.S., Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Cohen, Harriet, Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A., Queens College, MCP, Yale School of Art and Architecture 

Cole, Carroll P., Associate Professor, English 

B.A., Principia College, M.A., The Johns Hopkins University; D.F.A., 
Yale University 

Collins, James W., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.A., Rider College; B.S., Quinnipiac College 
CP.A. (Conn.) 

Colllnson, John, Professor, Humanities 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., 
The Johns Hopkins University 

Costello, Francis J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Newark College of Engineering 

Courtney, Dennis, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

M.A., Wayne State University; Ph.D., University of Ohio 

Cowglll, Sheila A., Assistant Professor, Humanities 

B.S., Brooklyn College; M.A., Yale University; M.A., Hunter College 
(on leave of absence) 

Crisco, Joseph, Lecturer, Economics 
B.S., University of Connecticut 

Cypress, Harold L., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering, Graduate School 
B.S.S.E., University of Florida 

DeFrances, Leroy A., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., Fordhim University 
C.P.A. (Conn.) 

Debar, Allan J., Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

Architect, Environmental Design Group, New Haven 

Desio, Peter J., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 



FACULTY 



123 



Devaney, Earl J., Lecturer, Business Administration 

A.B., Holy Cross College; M.B.A., University of Massachusetts 

DIBenedetto, Alphonse, Lecturer, Political Science and Criminal Justice 
B,S,, L.L.B., Fordham University 

Dineen. Denis, Lecturer, Chemistry. 

B.S., University of London; M.S., Ph.D., University of East Anglia, 
England 

Dinegar, Caroline, Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Disque, Robert 0., Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 

Donovan, Louis P., Associate Professor, Sociology 

B,A., San Jose State College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri 

Driscoll, John D., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Trinity College; B.E.E., M.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Dull, James, Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Duran, Gloria, Lecturer, English 

8. A., Wellesley College; M.A., Columbia University Russian Institute; 
M.A., Yale University 

Dzlengielewski, Ben F., Lecturer, Business Administration and Mathe- 
matics 
A.B., University of Michigan; M.S., M.A., Eastern Connecticut 
State College 

Effros, Charlotte, Lecturer, English. 

B.A., Queens College; M.S., University of Bridgeport 

Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Eisenman, Robert, Assistant Professor, Sociology 

B.S., University of Southern California; M.P.H., University of Cali- 
fornia at Los Angeles 

Ellison, Jerome, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Emerson, Hugh N., Professor, Economics 

A.B., The Johns Hopkins University; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Erickson, Bruce, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
B.A., Concordia College; M.A., Yale University 

Eskola, Margaret, Lecturer, English 

A.B,, Wheaton College; M.S., Central Connecticut State College 



Etlinger, Jay M., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 
B.S., University of Rochester; M.A., Syracuse University 

Fanning, James J., Lecturer, Economics 

B.S,, Seton Hall University; M.A., Fairfield University 

Ferry, Joseph L., Lecturer, Physics 
B.S., Fairfield University 

Fidler, Howard, Assistant Professor, Hotel Management 

B.S , Nev« York University; M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Fischer, Frederick F., Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., Northeastern University 
C.P.A. (Conn.) 

Flaumenhaft, Frank, Assistant Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University 

Flynn, Charles L., Lecturer, Business Administration 

Ph.B., Providence College; LL.B., Georgetown University 

Flynn, W. Paul, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.A., Duke University; LL.B., Georgetown University 

Foley, Richard G., Assistant Professor, Sociology and Public Adminis- 
tration 
B.S., Boston University; M.S., Case-Western Reserve 

Fredette, Robert K., Lecturer, Political Science 

B.S,, New York University; M.A., Columbia University 

Freddolino, Paul, Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A,, University of Notre Dame; M.A., Cornell University 

Friedman, Paula S., Lecturer, English 
B.A,, M.A., University of Chicago 

French, Bruce A., Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., University of Missouri; M.A., Western Reserve University; 
M.A., Middlebury College; M.A., Harvard University 

Frieling, Gerald H., Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.S.C.E,, University of Michigan 

Gabriel, Donald F., Lecturer, Science and Biology 
B.S., M.A., Fairfield University 

Gangler, Joseph M., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Garcia-Abrines, Luis, Lecturer, English 

B.A., Goya Institute, Madrid; M.A., University of Madrid 

Garcia-Negron, Miguel, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
B.S., University of Puerto Rico; M.Phil., Yale University 

Gardner, Joan A.. Lecturer, Fine Arts 
B.F.A,, M.F.A., University of Illinois 



124 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Garris, J. Russell, Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A , Queens College; M.S.W., University of Michigan 

George, Edward T., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S , MS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D. Engr., Yale University 

Ghoreyeb, John W., Associate Professo-, Arts and Sciences 
B.A., Yale University; M.A., Columbia University 

Gibble, Kenneth, Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B,A E., Pennsylvania State University 

Goldsmid, Alfred, Lecturer, Hotel Management 

Associate Professor, New York City Community College 

Gollinger, Stuart H., Lecturer, Accounting 

B.A , Colby; J.D., Suffoll< University; LLM, University of Miami 

Goluboff, Sydney J., Special Lecturer, English 
A.B., Amherst College 

Grava, Donald W., Lecturer, Business Administration 
A.S., Jr. College of Commerce; B.S., Syracuse University; M.S., 
University of Bridgeport 

Greenia, David, Lecturer, Humanities 

B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.Phil., Yale University 

Greet, Richard J., Associate Professor, Materials Engineering 

BEE, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Ph.D., Harvard 
University 

Grodzinsky, Stephen, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois 

Guagliumi, Arthur R., Lecturer, Fine Arts 

B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Gulati. Bodh Raj, Lecturer, Business Administration 

M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Gusella, Ernest, Lecturer. Fine Arts 

B.F.A , MF.A., San Francisco Art Institute 

Haberman, Ronald A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.A.E., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.O.R., Florida Institute 
of Technology 

Hagman, Lynn W., Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., Central Michigan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Detroit 

Hale, Graham, Assistant Professor, Physics 

B.S., Ph.D., University College of London University, London. 
England 

Hamel, Earl 0., Jr., Lecturer. Mathematics 
A.B., Marietta College 



Hamilton, Nathan W., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., Villanova College; LL.B., Fordham University 

Harman. Henry M., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering, Accounting, Gradu- 
ate School 
B.S., Lehigh University, M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 

Harpole, i. Marinda, Instructor, English 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College; A.M., Boston University 

Harron, Thomas, Lecturer, Hotel Management 

A.B., Georgetown University; M.B.A., University of Detroit; J.D., 
Georgetown University 

Hays, James, Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
AS., Thames Valley State Technical College 

Headley, Oliver, Lecturer, Economics, Graduate School 
A.B., Colgate University; M.S., Cornell University 

Heath, John M., Lecturer, Mathematics 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Yale University 

Henderson, Penelope, Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A., University of Sussex, England, MSC, University of London 

Hertel, Eugene S., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering, Graduate School 
B.S., University of Rhode Island; M.S., North Carolina State 

University 

Hiatt, Norman A., Lecturer, Chemistry 

B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., Lowell Technological 
Institute 

Hickey, Joseph E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

A.B., St. Anselm's College; M.S., Central Connecticut State College; 
Ed.D., Boston University 

Hill, Lisa, Lecturer, Political Science 
B.A., Wellesley College 

Hoffman, Henry H., Lecturer, Materials Engineering 
B.S., Michigan Technological University 

Hofmann, Ernest V. F., Assistant Professor, Physics 
B.S., Yale University; M.S., University of Bridgeport 

Hollov»ell, David A., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., Yale University 

Hollowell, Dorothy M., Instructor, English 

B.A., LeMoyne College; M.A.. Atlanta University 

Holman, William G., Associate Professor, Accounting 

A.B., Western State College of Colorado; M.A., Columbia University 
C.P.A. (New York) 



125 



Hopmayer, Norman, Professor, Business Administration 

B.S., M.S., Northwestern University; IVI.B.A., Ph.D., New York 
University 

Horning, Darrell W., Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., S.D. School of Mines; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Howland, Arthur H., Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

Land Surveyor, Conn., Mass., Maine, N. H., New York 
Professional Land Surveyor 

Howling, Robert T., Professor, English 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Penn. 
State University 

Hughes, Inge M., Lecturer, Science and Biology 

A.B., Barnard College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania 

Hunt, Leigh W., Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering, Graphics 

Former Assistant Chief Draftsman, Safety Electrical Equipment 
Corporation 

Hyman, Arnold, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Inman, Marion W., Lecturer, Mathematics 
B.S., St. Augustine's College 

Jarrett, Janice C, Lecturer, Music 

B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Wesleyan University 

Jensen, Eleanor, Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Jensen, Gwendolyn E., Assistant Professor, History 

B.A., University of Hartford; M.A., Trinity College; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Connecticut 

Jeschke, Reuben, Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A., Wesleyan University; B.A., STM, Hartford Theological Semi- 
nary; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Jewell, Walter 0., Ill, Assistant Professor, Sociology 

A.B., Harvard College; Ph.D., Harvard Graduate School 

Johnson, Leonard B., Lecturer, Accounting 

A.B.. Syracuse University; M.B.A., Harvard University 
C.P.A. (Connecticut) 

Johnson, Ruth A., Lecturer, Science and Biology 
A.B., Eastern Baptist College 

Johnston, Paul W., Lecturer, English 

B.A., Columbia University; M.A., New York University 



Kalma, Dennis L., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 
B.A., Knox College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Kandall, Geoffrey A., Lecturer, Mathematics 

B.A., Princeton: M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Kaplan, Morton D., Lecturer, Economics 
B.S., LL.B., University of Connecticut 

Kaplan, Nathaniel, Associate Professor, English 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Kaplan, Phillip S., Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 

Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Manchester University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Kelly, James P., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
A.S., B.S., University of New Haven 

Kelly, Lois, Lecturer, Physical Education 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State College 

Kendirii, Fatma, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., Robert College, Turkey; Dip. Ing., Darmstadt, Germany; M.S., 
Polytechnic Institute, Brooklyn 

Kennedy, George W., Assistant Professor, History 
B.A., M.A., Wesleyan University 

Kerzner, Elliot, Lecturer, Hotel Management 

B.S., Bryant College; M.S., University of Connecticut 

Kimball, Martha, Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., M.S., Yale University 

Kinderlehrer, Aaron, Lecturer, Political Science 
B.A., Yeshiva University 

Klender, Gerald J., Lecturer, Chemistry 

B.A., University of Buffalo; Ph.D., Purdue University 

Knebl, Siegmar, Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
A-SM.E., B.S.C.E., University of New Haven 

Knobel, Peter Rabbi, Lecturer, Philosophy 

A.B-. Hamilton College; B.H.L., M.A.H.L., Hebrew Union College; 
M. Phil., Yale University 

Kornstein, Susan, Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., City College of New York, M.S., Yale University 



126 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Krevolin, Diane, Lecturer, English 
B.S., M.A., Boston University 

Ladd, Richard A., Lecturer, Economics 

B.A , M.A , Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Ladish, Joseph, Lecturer, Science and Biology 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S., M.Phil., Yale 
University 

Lambrakis, Constantine C, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 
B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute 

Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Assistant Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Lawlor, Bernard, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
B.S., University of New Haven 

Lawrence, David S., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering, Graduate School 
A.B., Syracuse University; M.A., University of Bridgeport 

Lehman, Thomas J.. Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.B.A,, City College of New York; M.B.A. New York University 

Lemaire, Henry, Associate Professor, Chemistry 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., California 
Institute of Technology 

Leonard, Ira, Lecturer, Political Science 

B.A , M.A., City College of New York; Ph.D., New York University 

Levine, David Barton, Lecturer, Psychology 

B.A., Adelphi University; M.S., University of Bridgeport; M.S., 
Southern Connecticut State College 

Levine, Harvey, Lecturer, Accounting 
B.S., University of New Haven 

Levine, Lynn, Lecturer, Sociology 
B.A., University of Wisconsin 

Levy, Betty G., Lecturer, English 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., City College of New York 

Liberatore, Gary, Instructor, Physical Education 
B.S., University of New Haven 

Linquanti, Richard, Lecturer, Political Science 

A.B., M.A., University of Notre Dame; J.D., Yale Law School 

Lipiczky, Thomas, Assistant Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Manhattan School of Music; M.A., Wesleyan University 

Lipp, Richard M., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., M.B.A., University of New Haven 



Liu, David H. F., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering, Graduate School 
B.S., Jadarpur University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Lobay, Ivan, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

Dipl., Ing., Institute of Technology, Brno, Czechoslovakia; M.E., Cen- 
tral University of Venezuela 
Professional Eng'neer (Conn.) 

Loughlin, James, Lecturer, Economics, Graduate School 
B.S., Fordham University; M.A., Ph.D., Clark University 

Lugli, Raymond, Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut 

Lyon, Dean A., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

E.E., Cornell University; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Machnik, Joseph A., Assistant Professor, Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., Long Island University 
(leave of absence. Spring semester 1973) 

Maffeo, Edward J., Assistant Professor, Fine Arts 

B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design; M.A., Columbia University 

Maillard, Charles A., Jr., Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Southwest Missouri State College; J.D., St. Louis University 

Mandour, Ahmed R., Assistant Professor, Business Administration 
B.A., American University at Cairo; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma 

Mann, Richard A., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Northwestern University; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin 
Professional Engineer (Wisconsin) 

Mann, Richard A., Lecturer, Political Science 
B.S., University of North Carolina 

Marafioti, Frank, Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.C.E., University of Massachusetts; M.S.C.E., Worcester Poly- 
technic Institute; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Marezana, John, Lecturer, Hotel Management 

B.S,, Central Connecticut State College; M.S., Boston University 

Margiano, Raymond, Jr., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.S.C.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute 

Martin, John C, Professor, Civil Engineering 
B.E., M.E., Yale University 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., 
New York University 



127 



Masi, Richard, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., U.S. Merchant Marine Academy; M.B.A., University of Con- 
necticut 

Mathieu, Bertrand M., Assistant Professor, Engiisti 
B.A., Nasson College; M.A., University of Arizona 

Mathog, Alan D., Lecturer, Economics 

B.S., Wharton School of Finance; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

McCarthy, Thomas, Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

B.Mar.E., New York State Maritime College; M.S.M.E., University of 
Minnesota; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

McDonald, James E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

B.A., San Jose State College; M.P.A., City College of New Yorli 

McEnerney, Stuart J., Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; M.A., University of 
Connecticut 

McGinnis, J. Richard, Jr., Lecturer, Fine Arts 
B.A„ Southern Connecticut State College 

Mei, Donald N., Lecturer, Accounting 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania 
C.P.A. (Conn.) 

Mentzer, Thomas Lee, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Penn State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 

Moffitt, Elizabeth J., Assistant Professor, Fine Arts 
B.F.A., Yale University; M.A., Hunter College 

Monahan, Kathleen, Lecturer, Music 
B.A., University of California 

Montague, Richard A., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S., University of New Haven; M.S. I.E., Columbia University 

Moore, Robert E., Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.S.E., M.S., University of Connecticut 

Morphis, Maxine, Lecturer, Philosophy 
B.A., Brooklyn College 

Morris, Harris L., Lecturer, Chemistry 

BEngr., M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of 
Michigan 

Muller, Karl, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., Penn Morton College; MB.A., Drexel University 

Munro, Bruce, Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Rhode Island 



Murillo, Robert, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 
B.A., M.A., The University of New Mexico 

Naccarato, David, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., St. Mary of the Plains College; M.A., Wichita State University 

Nahmanson, Stephen, Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.S., Brooklyn College 
C.P.A. (New York) 

Nash, Mae, Lecturer, English 
B.A., College of St. Rose 

Nazzaro, Augustine A., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Nation, James G., Lecturer, Mathematics 
B.S., University of Connecticut 

Newell, John E., Lecturer, Chemistry 
B.A., University of British Columbia 

Nordlund, Kai K., Associate Professor, Business Administration 

LLB., University of Helsinki; LLM., Columbia University; D.J.S., 
New York Law School 

Nyce, William H., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Oberle, Robert A., Lecturer, Fine Arts 

B.F.A., Washington University School of Fine Arts; M.F.A., Yale 
University 

O'Brien, Robert V., Jr., Lecturer, English 

B.A., Brown University; M.A., Fairfield University; M.B.A., Univer- 
sity of Connecticut 

O'Keefe, Daniel, Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie-Mellon Univer- 
sity 

Oldham, Harold F., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.B.A., Pace College; M.S., Columbia University 

Olgin, Philip, Professor, Education 

B.S., Ed.M., Ed.D., Rutgers University 

Olson, Gregory, Lecturer, Sociology 
B.A., Augustana College 

Osborne, Laura Z., Lecturer, English 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., New York University 

Oslander, Marylou, Lecturer, English 

B.S., Central Connecticut State College 



128 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Oulundsen, Terry A., Lecturer, Business Administration, Graduate School 
B.A., Trinity College; M.B.A., Columbia Business School; M.S., 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Pangle, Diane R., Lecturer, History 

A.B., Cornell University, M.A., University of Chicago 

Pardi, Louis, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.B.A., University of 
Hartfcd 

Parker, Joseph, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A„ Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College, M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State Uni- 
versity of New York at Buffalo 

Patia, Barbara, Lecturer, Reading 

B.A., St. Joseph College; M.Ed., Hillyer College; M.A., Boston 
College 

Pernio, Michael, Lecturer, Reading 

B.S., University of Scranton; B.S., M.A., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Petersen, Wlllard, Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., Yale University; M.B.A., Tuck School of Business Administra- 
tion, Dartmouth College 

PleruccI, Mauro, Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn 

Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Pratt, Diana V., Lecturer, English 

B.A., Radcliffe College; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University 

Prelss, Gordon W., Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., University of New Haven; M.S.M.E., University of Massa- 
chusetts 

Prior, Frederick J., Lecturer, Accounting 
B.S., University of Connecticut 

Puglla, Salvatore A., Lecturer, Chemistry 

B.S., Fairfield University; M.S., Boston Ci; lege 

Quinlan, Mary K., Lecturer, Mathematics 
A.B., Albertus Magnus College 

Rajeswaran, Punnusany, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.Sc, University of Ceylon, M.Crim., University of California at 
Berkeley 

Ray, Garo W., Lecturer, Public Administration 
Certificate, Robert College 



Reams, Dinwiddle C, Jr., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 
B.Ch.E., University of Virginia; M.Eng., D.Eng., Yale University 

Reld, William A., Lecturer, Materials Engineering 
M.E., Lehigh University 

Relmer, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia University 
C.P.A. (Conn.) 

Rich, Anne, Instructor, Accounting 
B.A.. Queens College 
C.P.A., (Conn.) 

Roblllard, Douglas, Professor, English 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., V^ayne State University 

Robin, Gerald D., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Roble, Ahmed, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., Haile Selassie University, Ethiopia; B.A., M.A., Colorado State 
University 

Rogow, Lawrence, Lecturer, Civil Engineering 
B.S., B.A., Columbia University 

Certificate, Traffic Engineering, M.C.P. City Planning, Yale Univer- 
sity 

Ross, Bertram, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

M.S., Physics, V^llkes College; M.S., Mathematics, Courant Institute 
of Mathematical Sciences, New York University 

Rottman, Myrna, Lecturer, English 

A.B., Smith College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Ryan, Daniel B., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Providence College; J.D., St. Johns University 

Saleeby, Buddy B., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.A.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Sandman, Joshua, Assistant Professor, Political Science 
B.A., M.A., New York University 

Santangelo, Daniel, Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.B.A., City University of New York 

Sarosi, Dliver, Professor, Economics 

B.C.S., New York University; M.S., Ph.D., Royal Hungarian University 

Sawhney, Shiv. L., Assistant Professor, Business Administration 

B.A., LL.B., Delhi University; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Schaefer, George A., Assistant Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., University of Rochester; M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 



129 



SchiessI, Henry W., Lecturer, Chemistry 

B.S., Chem. Eng., Cornell University; Ph.D., Science, University of 
Heidelberg 

Schiro, George J., Lecturer, History 

B.A., St. Joseph's College; M.A., Fordham University 

Schlamme, Martha, Lecturer, Theatre 

Member, Repertory Theatre, Long Wharf 

Schnabel, Joachim W., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.A., Yale University; M.B.A., Columbia University 

Scholl, William L., Associate Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Davidson College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary 

Schulman, Sidney, Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
B. A., LL.B., University of Connecticut 

Schuster, George W., Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.A., Yale College; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Seaman, Paul E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 
B.A., LL.B., University of Connecticut 

Sedlik, Earl D., Lecturer, Business Administration 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; M.B.A., Harvard University 

Sherwood, Franklin B., Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Shuer, David, Lecturer, Sociology 

B.S., Springfield College; M.S.W., Columbia University, School of 
Social Work 

Slegel, Harvey, Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., City College of New York 

Silhert, Jonathan E., Lecturer, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Dartmouth College; LL.B., Harvard Law School 

Sllbert, Louis, Assistant Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., M.B.A.. University of Hartford 

Silverberg. Sidney, Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A., M.S S.A., Case Western Reserve University 

Smith, Donald M., Assistant Professor, English 

A.B., Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University 

Smith, Patricia Q., Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Smith, Warren J., Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern University 



Sniegowski, Bernard J., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering, Graduate 
School 
B.S.M.E., Western New England College 

Sommers, Alexis N., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

Spall, W. Dale, Lecturer, Chemistry 

B.A., Colorado College; Ph.D., University of New Mexico 

Stanley, Richard M., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale 
University 

Stark, Evan. Lecturer, Sociology 

B.A., Brandeis University, M.A., University of Wisconsin 

Staugaard, Burton C, Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 

Steinhauser, Harry H., Jr., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E., Ch.E., Princeton University; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Stevenson, Kay G., Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., University of California; Ph.D., 
Yale University 

Stolper, Edwin F. Lecturer, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College of New York; M.C.E., New York University 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Stone, Michael J., Instructor, Industrial Engineering 
B.S.I.E., M.S. I.E., Columbia University 

Strother, Horatio, Lecturer, History 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut 

Sugrue, Edward F., Lecturer, Mathematics 

B.A., Yale University; M.S.T., Union College 

Sullivan, John J., Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., St. John's University; M.A., Purdue University; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Virginia 

Surti, Kantilal K., Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delaware 
(on sabbatical leave 1972-1973) 

Suryatmodjo, Kun, Lecturer, Economics 
M.A., Williams College 

Talisman, Esther, Lecturer, Psychology 

A.B., University of Rochester; B.S., East Stroudsburg State College; 
M.A., SUNY at Brockport; M.Ed., Rutgers University 



130 



UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



Tatangelo, George, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., New Britain Teacher's College; M.S., University of Bridge- 
port 

Teluk, John, Associate Protessor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.S., University of 
New Haven, M.A., Free University, Munich 

Tenenbaum, Mircea, Lecturer. Electrical Engineering 
M.S.E.E., Bucharest Polytechnic Institute 

Terrell, Timothy, Lecturer, Political Science 
B.A., University of Maryland 

Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.A., Ph.D.. University of Illinois 

Thompson, Edward A., Lecturer, Psychology 

B,A., Denison University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Delaware 

Tiernan, George R., Professor, Business Administration 
B.A., Yale University; LL.B., Cornell University 

Tillett, Peter Irwin, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering, Graduate School 
BSc, B.A., Mathematics, and Diploma Education, University of 
Adelaide, South Australia; M.A., University of Connecticut 

Toionen, Karl E., Lecturer, Biology 

B.S., Arizona State University; M.Phil., Yale University 

Tosello, Matthew Rev., Lecturer, English 
B.A., Seminario 

Internazionale Missioni Consolata, Italy 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duquesne University 

Totten, Marvin 0., Lecturer, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Hartford; M.A., Fairfield University 

Tscholl, Ekifehard J. H., Associate Professor, Physics 

Diplommgenieur, Technische Hochschule Wien, Austria; Dr. 
Techn., Technische Hoogeschool Eindhoven, The Netherlands 

Tyndali, Bruce, Associate Professor, Mathematics 
B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 

Urs, Vankataramaraj S., Lecturer, Materials Engineering 

B.Sc, University of Mysore; M.Sc, Benares University; M.S., Ph.D., 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 

Van Dyke, Elisabeth, Lecturer, Hotel Management 

B,A., University of California; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Vasileff, Henry D., Assistant Professor, Business Administration 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; M.B.A., University of Connecticut; 
Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Vieira, Florindo, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 



Voegeli, Henry E., Assistant Professor, Science and Biology 
B.A., Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 

Walters, Ruth, Lecturer, Psychology 

B.S., East Stroudsbury State College; M.Ed., Rutgers University 

Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

BE., Yale University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Professional Engineer (Conn.) 

Warner, Thomas, III, Lecturer, Mathematics 
B.A., Lehigh University 

Washington, Dell, Lecturer, Political Science 
B.A., Stanford University 

Waszmer, Roger F., Lecturer, Physics 

B.E.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Watts, Susan, Lecturer, Economics 

B.A., M.A., Nottingham, University of England 

Weinstein, Josef A., Lecturer, Business Administration 
B.A., Yale University; LL.B., University of Connecticut 

Whelan, Frank, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., University of New Haven; M.A., Trinity College 

White, William, Lecturer, English 

B.A., Union College; M.S., Syracuse University 

Wiener, Bernard, Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.S., M.B.A., New York University 

Willard, Lawrence F., Lecturer, English 
A.B., Middlebury College 

Williams, Jeffrey L., Assistant Professor, Accounting 

A.A., Dean Junior College; B.S., University of New Haven; M.B.A., 
University of Bridgeport 

Wilson, David, Lecturer, Science and Biology 
B.S., University of New Haven 

Winn, Ben Thomas, Lecturer, Science and Biology 

B.A., University of California at Berkeley; M.A., University of Utah 

Wise, Mark P., Lecturer, Political Science 
B.A., The Johns Hopkins University 

Wittie, Paul A., Lecturer, Economics 
B,S., University of New Haven 

Woods, Jimmie D., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering, Graduate School 
B.S., U. S. Coast Guard Academy; M.S., Trinity College; Ph.D., 
University of Connecticut 



FACULTY 



131 



Wright, H. Fessenden, Professor, Science and Biology 
A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
(leave of absence, Spring semester 1973) 

Wright, William H., Lecturer, Science and Biology 

B.S., University of Vermont; M.S., Boston University 

Wyckoff, Lydia L., Lecturer, Fine Arts 
M.F.A., University of Lausanne 
Heye Foundation, New York 

Wynschenk, Donald, Assistant Professor, Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Yanover, Ruth W., Associate Professor, Business Administration 
B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin 



York, Michael W., Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland 



Zabinski, Toby, Lecturer, English 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.A., University of Connecticut 



Zilveti, Halina J., Lecturer, English 

B.S., Boston University; M.A., Columbia University 



Zottola, Armand, Lecturer, Economics, Graduate School 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



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